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The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 2, 1939-02-02
Page 3
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor. The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 2, 1939-02-02 - Page 3. February 2, 1939. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 18, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/990/show/988.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor. (February 2, 1939). The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 2, 1939-02-02 - Page 3. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/990/show/988

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor, The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 2, 1939-02-02 - Page 3, February 2, 1939, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 18, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/990/show/988.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 2, 1939-02-02
Alternative Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. I, No. 2, 1939-02-02
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Pipp, M. A., circulation
  • Beckwith, R. L., printer
  • Essy, E., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Norfolk, Virginia
Date February 2, 1939
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 3
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
Item Description
Title Page 3
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
File Name _0647_R.pdf
Transcript the molded breadth of a away with the statement that in this part of the world no doubt an ex­ceptionally strong southern current was prevalent. How absurbly wrong this belief was to be revealed later. Where once we , vere looking only ahead and forward we realized with the operation of the first steps of the plans that we had at last arrived. Now it was either fight or be whipped and slink back to civilizaton much like beaten dogs who were found wanting when so much was required. I believe everyone aboard, then and there, appraised himself from his ioul outward And I must confess that a few of us were found to be distinctly wanting when all our points had been summarized. Those in this category resolved to meet the test with doubled up fists when the time came. The more fortunate said that their records would speak for themselves. I had the very good fortune after­wards to hear from the lips of the leading aviator his picture of the epoch making flight. Highly interest­ing and depicting graphically the im­pressions of an aviator seeing for the first time the polar regions from aloft, his account, as I remember it, is quoted verbatim. " On the morn­ing of our flight the weather was excellent both in regard to ceiling, ' vind, and visibility. Whereas we had not expected any difficulty in the search over the icebergs we did not take into account the electrical phen­omena which seriously effected the directive forces of our magnetic com­passes. As soon as we were catapulted into the air this was brought home to us by rapid unnatural swinging of the compass. In the vernacular of the streets ' they just wouldn't stay put nohow'. We were able, notwithstand­ing this difficulty, to search with pain­staking care the surrounding terri­tory. By stationing planes barely within visible distance of each other, the one closest to the ship being within sight of the parent vessel, we were able to rotate as spokes in a huge wheel. While this method did not readily lend itself to great dis­tances it nevertheless permitted us to search most thoroughly the nearby area. The special Arctic flight cloth­ing kept us from being uncomfortable although the cold icy winds ranged from forty degrees below zero to THE BLDE ! BONNET sometimes one hundred and fifty de­grees below. My impressions of the panorama which now lay spread out below me varied greatly. The aurora borealis stretching with its colorful fingers ever upward to lose them­selves at last in the rare stratosphere impressed me. The icebergs, cold and blue wth two- thirds of their height extending below water also impressed me. But outside of these, frankly, I was disappointed. ( There being no need to explain the various shadings and ramifications of the temperament of the relater in thi serial, and be­cause as such it lies beyond the scope of this printed page, no further ex­planation concerning his disappoint­ment will now be gone into.) Altho I scanned the country below quite efficiently I could not make out one little stir of life. I could not see that blob of white which meant a polar bear was below." To be continued. Don't miss the next Installment: will the aviators discover polar bears? -- ...,.., Power and Pressure In the days of the Civil War the weight of propelling machinery a­board war vessels for the horse power produced was vastly greater than it is today. Then it was not unheard of to have cylinders over 100 inches in diameter. The weight of the engines has diminished slowly through the years. It became less when the com­pound engine came into use, less again when the triple expansion en­gine with condensers were the rule. With the change from upright cylin­der engines to the turbine there was a great reduction in weight to the amount of power produced. The tendency now is to get greater and greater power out of the turbines by increasing the steam pressure up and up. The Grace Line steamships have been running their ships successfully for years with steam pressure between three and four hundred pounds to the square inch. Many naval vessels exceed this pressure today and it has been predicted that in the near future a pressure of 1,000 pounds per square inch will come into use. Page 3 Boxers and Wrestlers Leave Ship The well wishes of all the crew went with our boxers and wrestlers when they were transferred last Sat­urday to the Northampton. This was necessary so that they could par­ticipate in the cruiser semi- finals that took place the next day ashore in Guantanamo. Weare in Norfolk out of touch with the doings of our boxers and wrestlers but all of us will be eagerly scanning the first news that comes through. ...... Quesions ( Answers on Page Four.) What ship? What is " Camber"? )' Vhat is " Sheer"? What is the difference between Dead­weight tonnage, et tonnage, and Gross tonnage? ..... I Don't Get It Those who think these jokes are poor Would straitway change their views Could they compare the ones we print With those that we refuse. He: " Darling, your waist is the smal­lest I have ever seen." She: " Of corset is" Sailor, very young sailor, meets bea­utiful, very beautiful blond. . " Say, how about a date tonite?" She looked at his young face and scornfully: " Sorry, but I can't go out with a baby." " Pardon me, I didn't know." A man from the cellar always comes up smiling. Success is a fraud. By the time you are rich enough to sleep late, you are so old you wake up early. You've got to pity the modern girl. Everything she wants to do is either illegal, immoral, or fattening.