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The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 2, 1939-02-02
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor. The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 2, 1939-02-02 - Page 2. February 2, 1939. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 14, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/990/show/987.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor. (February 2, 1939). The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 2, 1939-02-02 - Page 2. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/990/show/987

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor, The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 2, 1939-02-02 - Page 2, February 2, 1939, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 14, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/990/show/987.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 2, 1939-02-02
Alternative Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. I, No. 2, 1939-02-02
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Pipp, M. A., circulation
  • Beckwith, R. L., printer
  • Essy, E., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Norfolk, Virginia
Date February 2, 1939
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 3
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
Item Description
Title Page 2
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
File Name _0647_L.pdf
Transcript Page 2 -; THE BLUE BONNET ;- A weekly publication of the ship's company of the U. S. S. Houston, Captain G. N. Barker, U. S. N.. Commanding and Commander C. A. Bailey. U. S. N., Executive Officer. Editor: Lieut. ( jg) E. A. McDonald Assistant Editor: Ensign J. P. M. Johnston Cartoonist: W. C. Ridge Circulation: M. A. Pipp. Seale Printers: R. L. Beckwith, Seale E. Essy. Sea2e Slaughter Among the Icebergs ( Continued from Page 1.) It must not be forgotten that dur­ing this trying ordeal the ship was forced to continue its course of 000° True. Stern hands kept the bow head­ed for the Polar regions. In spite of the black fog which shut out sight and rendered duties extremely dif­ficult to perform the men stood their watches faithfully. What was accom­plished was done by touch alone. But now to make matters much worse a violent electrical storm lashed out from the darkness. Its fury was un­comparable. The best attempt in des­cribing the terrifying forces and the wrathful vengeance of nature would fall woefully short of the truth. How­ever, it is sufficient to say that light­ning sent its jagged piercing stream­ers in an almost never ending stream from sky to water. The electrical dis­play was awe- inspiring. Later, many of the crew were heard to relate that it was the best durned Fourth of July Celebration they'd ever seen. No doubt, too, the danger lent zest and many thrills to spectators. Call it a freak of the storm or by any other name, yet a - near miracle now came to pass. A peculiarly green colored bolt of lightning containing many volts of electrical energy struck o. 1 turret. The turret glowed like molten iron for a few moments then automatically trained itself around to 180°. As a result its guns tore through the bulkhead into the cap­tain's cabin. No cognizance was then taken of this significant action mainly because attention was centered on the safety and integrity of the ship. We were to learn later of the amazing effect of the supercharged bolt. During the rolling and pitching of the vessel many of the crew felt the rigors of the sea. Much of this effect THE BLUE ' BONNET very unfortunately went to their sto­machs. The pickles taken aboard while in port performed invaluable service. Some of the crew became quite at­tached to them and felt that most everything might have been lost ( and well it might) if it hadn't been for their soothing influence. Later, I was told by most reliable sources that these unfortunates banded themselves in a society to further the popularity of the pickle. To this present day, it was also said, the society still carrys out its convictions and aims. Coincidentally when the last pickle was gone, the storm lifted as suddenly as it had appeared. Sunshine and good weather replaced the foul. A velvety sea replaced a seething cauldron, The only remaining trace of the rather unusual weather was a layer of soot which caked the entire ship from stem to stern. If we could have seen our ship and ourselves then from a dis­tant t. ation in a detached manner no doubt we would have laughed most heartily. Everyone looked like the colored messboys. The ship looked as if he'd been carrying coal for centuries. The occasion proved any­thing but humoroui; after consider­ing it from the angle of labor in­volved. An emergency field day was held. Before long as a result of long and well planned work the ship e­merged as from a chrysallis, spotless and shiny, the pride of the seas and a credit to our Navy. After a few days of storm, daily routine was reestablished and normal­cy flowed on as serenely as a moun­tain brook. Except for one thing, a quite weighty reminder, the storm with it events wouldnave fa( fed into the limbo of time. No. 1 turret could not or would not be budged from its reversed position. Although almost every mind aboard devised methods of returning the ailing turret to its normal position all efforts failed mis­erably. There was only one thing left to do. That was for everyone concern­ed to adopt the policy of " live and let live" of " what is must be". This was then hastily concurred in and all hands repaired to the sick bay where the ship's doctor prescribed ample proportions of medical alcohol. Day followed day with amazing reg­ularity. Except for the continued fall­ing of the thermometer each day was like the rest. Then finally there came that day, long thereafter remembered, when a single iceberg hove in sight. Blue- white and glistening like a mil­lion diamonds in the sunlight it pre­sented truly a wonderful sight. Here then was one of the far flung fron­tiers of the polar regions. On the or del' for the day peacoats, double watch caps, and woolen socks were pre­scribed the uniform of the day. Becau e of the fact that we were rapidly approaching the iceberg pack the landing force was mustered with full equipment. Under the leadership of the 2nd Lieutenant in the Marine Corps all units marched about the decks like they had never marched before. They pirouetted, parried, made feints toward an inaginary enemy, and otherwise performed with their various guns. Naturally they came in for a good share of rather caustic remarks and ribaldry from interested and amused spectators, but by sett­ing their minds to the duty and the job before them no amount of out­side horseplay could even as much as elicit one strained smile. Within the short period of two days the landing force was pronounced ready for any emergency or trial that could beset them in the frozen northland. Finally, before us, as far as the eye could see loomed inpenetrable bergs, floes, and ice fields. The grind­ing, churning roar of crushing rest­less ice filled the ail' with eerie sound, Men had to shout in order to be heard. Before us was our destination. Now to its successful completion. Plans were now laid with infinite detail. It was decided that J; he- logi first step would be to send the four planes out on a scouting mission. The discovery of the piece de resistance was, to say the least, of prime impor­tance. Polar bears were necessary to successfully CUlminate our undertak­ing. Flight call brought the aviators to their stations on the double. In a few minutes each plane, fully equiped to withstand the terrific cold, was cat­apulted. Meanwhile although the main en­gines had stopped it was found neces­sary to back down continually to avoid crashing full tilt into the ice­bergs. Still not the least bit of alarm was felt because of this rather un­usual procedure. It was explained