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The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 1, 1939-01-20
Page 4
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor. The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 1, 1939-01-20 - Page 4. January 20, 1939. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 14, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/985/show/984.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor. (January 20, 1939). The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 1, 1939-01-20 - Page 4. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/985/show/984

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor, The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 1, 1939-01-20 - Page 4, January 20, 1939, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 14, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/985/show/984.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 1, 1939-01-20
Alternative Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. I, No. 1, 1939-01-20
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Pipp, M. A., circulation
  • Beckwith, R. L., printer
  • Essy, E., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (Local)
  • Enroute Gonaives, Haiti
Date January 20, 1939
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 3
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
Item Description
Title Page 4
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
File Name _0645_L.pdf
Transcript Page 4 NOVEMBER 21, 1918 SURRENDER OF THE GERMAN HIGH SEAS FLEET Admiral von Reuter, commanding German officer, went aboard the Queen Elizabeth, and there arranged with Admiral Beatty and his flag officers for the surrender of the Ger­man High Seas fleet. At dinner the German officers dined at one table, the British at another. After more discussion, Admiral von Reuter de­parted on the Koenigsberg for Kiel about ten that night. The Command- • er- in- Chief then isued orders to all his ships, prescribing the entire de­tails of the surrender. The Sixth Battle Squadron, composed of the American ships New York, flagship, Admiral Rodman, the Texas, Wyom­ing, Arkansas, and Florida, the Dela­ware having returned home, got under way at 4 a. m. on November 21, 1918, and steamed from the Forth Bridge out of the Firth into the North Sea. The entire British Grand Fleet was here concentrated, formed in two parallel lines, steaming due east six miles apart, the American squadron being the second one in the Northern line. About 9 a. m. the men crowding the decks sighted some smoke coming dead ahead out of the mist and in a short time the German battle cruisers were plainly seen leading the other German ships in their last trip at sea under their own flag. The Ger­man fleet was not flying battle flags. At this time everyone of the Anglo­American ships was at her battle stations, turrets and secondary bat­teries were fully manned, and all preparations made for treachery at the last minute. The German line, led by the Seyd­litz, steamed slowly between the Allied lines, keeping perfect station, and when their flagship came abreast of the Queen Elizabeth the signal was given for the whole Grand Fleet to make a turn of 180 degrees, and re­turn into port with the surrendered enemy. The appearance of the enemy ships was very good. The fleets pro­ceeded into port in this formation, the lines gradually converged as the ships approached the entrance of the Firth of Forth. After reaching a point a short distance in the Firth the Ger­man ships dropped anchor, and Ad­miral Beatty on his flagship stood by THE BLUE ! BONNET to inspect them. About three o'clock that afternoon Admiral Beatty sent his famous message, " The German flag will be hauled down at sunset today, and will not be flown again until further orders." The German ships a few days later, after more inspection, were convoyed to their port of internment at Scapa Flow. German ships at surrender at Scapa Flow: Battle Cruisers: von Del' Tann, Molke, Kaiser Fridrich, Del' Grosse, Kaiserin, Koenig Albert, Prinz Reg­ent Luitpold, Seidlitz, Koenig, Gross­er Kurfurst, Markgraf, Kronprinz Wilhelm, Derflinger, Hindenburg, Ba­den, Bayern. Cruisers: StJrassblurg, : qret:; den, Frankfurt, Kolm, Nurnberi', Brum­mer, Bremser. On June 21, 1919, German crews sunk most of the German ships at Scapa Flow. el · ... Fort San Lorenzo ( Continued from Page 3.) the present day still guards the mouth of the Chagres which was for­merly the only opening to interio:' Panama. Although its crumbled walls. a good eight feet in thickness, show the ravages of time it houses many historical souvenirs. Old canons and countless rounds of round shot lie rusting and eroding in the tropical atmosphere. A moat, 15 feet acrosf;' and twenty five feet deep, still pre­vents ingress from any angle except over the ancient drawbridge. To have seen this evidence of by­gones days will give all the sightseers­an interesting subject of talk when they return to the States. They were lucky to have seen it. ...... I Don't Get It " Oi, Oi... Look at dot pretty pigeon." " That's a gull." " So vat? . gull or boy . its still a pretty pigeon" There are no marriage ties, the wife always wins. Another dffierence between a mar­ried man and a bachelor is that when a bachelor walks the floor with a baby he is dancing. t U. S. S. Houston- 1- 20- 39- 900. The sails of the U. S. S Constitution, one of our Navy's historic ships which saw service in the War of 1812, devel­oped 600 horse pow­er from a full spread of canvas with a wind that is said to have driven the ship at a maximum speed of 13 knots. The effectiveness of this type of ship was so noted that the British Admiralty ordered British frigates to cruise in pairs and under no cir­cumstances, where avoidable, to ac­cept single ship action with an Amer­ican frigate. * * * * Klim is the word ' milk' in reverse. Powdered milk is not a 20th century concoction for Navy men, but accord­ing to historians, was used by Greek sea captains 2,600 years ago. Much of it was made from goats' milk. * * • • A bamboo shoot about a foo~ in length, carried the news of a sinking ship that did not sink. A Spanish Cap­tain saw his vessel " Elizabeth" <; ink­ing fast 2,300 miles from home dur­ing a storm in the year 1512. He sealed important records in the bam­boo shoot, stopping both ends with rags and hot wax. After the contain­er was tossed overboard, the storm abated and the ship and men were saved. The bamboo shoot was re­trieved off the coast of Italy 5 years later. • • • * The first sausage mill was said to have been used aboard early French ships and invented for the purpose of making meat more easily cooked. Sto­mach trouble, it is said, was reduced 96 per cent by the adoption of the meat grinder. ..... Modern umbrellas are made of trans­parent materal. This enables a per­son to see where he is going - or if the owner is coming. Do right and fear no man - Do not write and fear no woman.