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The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 1, 1939-01-20
Page 3
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor. The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 1, 1939-01-20 - Page 3. January 20, 1939. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 18, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/985/show/983.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor. (January 20, 1939). The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 1, 1939-01-20 - Page 3. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/985/show/983

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor, The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 1, 1939-01-20 - Page 3, January 20, 1939, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 18, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/985/show/983.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 1, 1939-01-20
Alternative Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. I, No. 1, 1939-01-20
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Pipp, M. A., circulation
  • Beckwith, R. L., printer
  • Essy, E., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (Local)
  • Enroute Gonaives, Haiti
Date January 20, 1939
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 3
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
Item Description
Title Page 3
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
File Name _0644_R.pdf
Transcript The Panama Canal ( Continued from Page 1.) Under continuous operation the ca­pacity of the present canal is approx­imately 48 ships of usual size per day, or about 17,000 a year. The Panama Canal has been built because of the distances it saves ocean commerce. Between New York and San Francisco the distance of 13,135 nautical miles by the way of the straits of Magellan has been l'e­duced to 5,262 by the Canal, a saving of 7,873, or three- fifths. If the cost of operating a ship be taken at 20 cents per net ton a day, the cost of the tolls on laden ships is about equivalent to six days of op­eration at sea. During the three year period end­ing 30 June 1937 the total of ocean going vessels measuring 300 or more net tons which passed through the Canal was 15,949. Tolls paid on them amounted to $ 69,888,314.26. During this period the traffic averaged, per month, 443 vessels. The vessels were of 34 nationalities, U. S. ships form­ing about 24 percent. The average commercial ship pays approximately $ 4,400 in tolls for transit. While the Panama Canal was opened for traffic in August 1914 the early years of opel'ation were hampered by slides and commercial traffic did not '. reach normal developement until after the close of the World War era. For this reason the Canal is not consid­ered to have been completed until the year of its official opening in 1920, and on that basis the cost of con­structing the Canal has been calcul­ated at $ 510,901,364. Weather on the Isthmus is continu­ous summer. January to April, inclu­sive, are the normal dry season months, during which there is com­paratively little rainfall. May to December is the normal rainy season period with about 63 inches of rain on the Pacific side, and 117 inches on the Atlantic. One of the oldest known jokes in captivity is that in Panama in the wet season it rains all the time and in the dry season it rains only eight or ten times a day. In 1879, the French came to build a Canal, headed by Count Ferdinand THE BLUE ! BONNET de Lesseps, builder of the Suez Can­al. But a lack of knowledge of tropi­cal diseases and other causes, imper­fect sanitation methods and other fac­tors contributed towards the failure of this effort by the French. : Meanwhile, discontent in Panama towal'd the Columbian govemment of Isthmus had reached the breaking point. The beginning of the 20th Cen­tury found Columbia negotiating with the United States for a treaty where under the latter would be empowered to buy the French Canal Company's pl'operties and rights on the Isthmus. This treaty drawn up and signed by the plenipotentiaries of the United States and Columbia, was found sat­isfactory by the Panamian people who saw in it a new hope fOT the fu­ture. But when submitted to the Co­lumbian Congress for ratification, it was rejected, in spite of the protests of Panama's representatives. The rejection of the treaty spurred the Panamanians to decisive action, and on November 3, 1903, the inde­pendence or separation of the Isth­mus from Columbia was proclaimed. Negotiations were immediately start­ed with the United States, resulting in the present Panama Canal Treaty which grants to the United States authority over a strip of Isthmian ter­ritory ten miles wide by fifty miles long wherein to build, maintain and operate a canal. ....... The Man Who Wins The man who wins is an average man, Not built on any particular plan, Not blessed with any particular luck, Just steady and earnest and full of pluck. When asked a question he does't guess He knows the answers ' No' and ' Yes'. When set to the task the rest can't do, He buckles right down till he puts it through. So he works and waits till one fine day There is a better job with bigger pay. And the man who shirked whenever he could Is bossed by the man who's work made good. For the man who wins is the man who works, Who neither labor nor trouble shirks, Who uses his hands, his head, his eyes The man who wins is the man who TRIES. Page 3 Fort San Lorenzo Visited by Houston Party A party composed of camera fans, would- be fishermen, and sightseers had the very good fortune to set out from the Houston last Sunday morn­ing and joumey to the oldest fort e­rected in either of the Americas. Its history intertwined with intrigue and bloodshed is g, revelation in suffering and the fight of man against tropical jungles and fever ridden waters. A few following facts from historr is traced here to give an idea 0f its early origin. In the year of 1509 La Cosa and Nicucsa, t. wo Spanish favor­ites of King Ferdinand, prepared for a joint expedition to Hispaniola and thence to ultimately capture Peru. Jamaica was placed at their disposal to serve as a supply base. But Colum­bus, a bitter enemy of Nicuesa be­cause of the latter's popularity with the King, would not grant permission to the use of Jamaica as a supply base so part of the expedition estab­lished a base at the mouth of the Cha­gres River. The party, numbering ov­er 700 men at the outset, dwindled down through famine and disease to a mere 70 in the December of 1510. A blockhouse was then constructed. This was the beginning of the Fort. Although named " Nombre De Dios" by the builders it eventually lost this name through successive con­structions, and the name " Fort San Lorenzo" was finally applied to it. o It is interesting to note the ruth­lessness of the Spaniards in apply­ing their will to the Indian inhabi­tants of the country. Indians were forced to work at the points of guns. The fort therefore was constructed entirely by Indian labor under the guidance of the Spanish conquerors. Balboa, who came a few years later to discover the Pacific Ocean by trans­versing the Isthmus, also wreaked great hard hips on the native pop­ulation by having them carry his ships piece by piece to the Pacific side. In a few years, historians relate. the Indian population was reduced from three million down to a bare two hundred. The Fort was captured and burned once by the notorious Pirate Morgan, then reconstructed no less than four times. The Fort as it stands during ( Continued on Page 4.)