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The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 1, 1939-01-20
Page 2
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor. The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 1, 1939-01-20 - Page 2. January 20, 1939. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 18, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/985/show/982.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor. (January 20, 1939). The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 1, 1939-01-20 - Page 2. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/985/show/982

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor, The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 1, 1939-01-20 - Page 2, January 20, 1939, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 18, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/985/show/982.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 1, 1939-01-20
Alternative Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. I, No. 1, 1939-01-20
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Pipp, M. A., circulation
  • Beckwith, R. L., printer
  • Essy, E., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (Local)
  • Enroute Gonaives, Haiti
Date January 20, 1939
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 3
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
Item Description
Title Page 2
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
File Name _0644_L.pdf
Transcript Page 2 THE BLUE ! BONNET EDITORIAL A weekly publication of the ship's company of the U. S. S. Houston, Captain G. N. Barker, U. S. N., Commanding and Commander C. A. Bailey, U. S. N., Executive Officer. Editor: Lieut. ( jg) E. A. McDonald Assistant Editor: Ensign J. P. M. Johnston Cartoonist: W. C. Ridge Circulation: M. A. Pipp, Seale Printers: R. L. Beckwith. Seale E. Essy Sea2c Cotton Curio The erection of the Lea- sowe Light­house on sandy Wirral Shore, Eng­land, presented what appeared to be an unsurmountable difficulty because of the instability of the sandy shore and the lack of a suitable foundation for the masonry tower. The difficulty was solved in a very strange manner. An incoming American ship, laden with cotton, had gone ashore and was wrecked nearby. The cotton bales were salvaged and dumped into the sand at the point where the lighthouse was to be erected. The fleecy mass settled into the sand and became as solid as the hardest rock. On this curious foundation was erected the lighthouse which has endured for one hundred and seventy- five years. With the return of our printer, Beckwith, who was so unfortunate as to be knocked down by an automobile in Long Beach during the Holiday season, the Blue Bonnet returns to its regular printed form. The ship's paper will come out weekly, as orig­ally scheduled. The Houston finds itself in the rare position of embarking upon many in­teresting cruises which are highly historical as well as interesting. On these cruises different ports are visit­ed and likewise many interesting inci­dents develop. The Blue Bonnet is not intended to be the organ of the few. On the contrary it should be the spokesman and messenger of all the officers and crew aboard the Houston. The editorial staff ( very few in numbers) solicit your contributions and ideas. If they are good ideas we shall be glad to use them. This does not apply only to the crew. Write- ups and suggestons from officers are also desired. If you think you have some­thing good do not hesitate in bring­ing it to the atte. n. t. i. o. n. of the editor. Boxing and Wrestling ( Continued from Page 1.) - - ~.._-- blood and fighting spirit by accept­ing what some believe is a bad break. The Blue Bonnet, in the interests of the entire ship's company wishes to extend to them a hearty handclasp and " good luck". But all was not to be calm sailing. Little did we all realize the dangers and mishaps that were in store for us. The first near calamity struck without any premonition of coming evil. It struck from a clear sky. It happened on the second day out. Peculiar black clouds were reported by the lookouts on the morning of this eventful day. The cloud formation was mystifying although much study with reference books brought out the fact that sometimes huge anvil shap­ed clouds, dark in appearance, are the forerunners of a major electrical dis­turbance. The stacks were carefully checked for undue amount of smok­ing. The last resort, that the firerooms were blowing tubes and thus causing the clouds, was finally discarded. The ship was distinctly in for it. With a rush like the flurry of bats black fog enveloped the ship. It was impossible to distinguish one's hand before his face. The steersman was frantic trying to keep the vessel on a steady course. Wild waves and wind made steering well nigh impossible, and what was worse yet was the fact that the compass' face was blotted out by the fog. However, one enter­prising electrician, with the help of a few hardy volunteers succeeded in rigging a large searchlight to help illuminate the steering compass. This proved a lifesaver as the steersman could, by straining his eyes, see the compass. Steering watches were re­lieved every ten minutes, lookouts were done away with. Most of the others stuck to their assignments like true sons of the sea. They would fight to the end. Suddenly stark fear gripped the ship when a terrifying scream from No. 2 messing compartment rent the air. Insane laughter followed. Some messcook had cracked under the ter­rific strain. ( to be continued) Don't fail to read the next episode. Will the elements bring disaster to the ship? Slaughter Among the Icebergs ( Continued from Page 1.) during the coming voyage. Spying a dozen barrels on the dock, he elected to load them into his boat and return the car- go to the ship. When a barrel was experimentally opened on board a rousing cheer went up from all stations - for there nestling . snugly in their vinegar brine were thousands of well proportioned pickles, a quick cure for any sea harrassed stomach. Soon all boiler safeties were popping off like a steam caliope at a home town carnival and it was high time to take our last landfall for many days. A very touching scene now occurred which was amazing for its ingenuity. While the anchor chain rattled up the hawse pipes a large yacht crept up to the Houston to lay broadside. It was loaded with the sweathearts, wives, and families of all the officers and crew of the ship. A band from some­where struck up " I didn't raise my boy to be a sailor", the ones we were leaving behind waved their handker­chiefs in a fond gesture of farewell, and the officers and crew alike wept openly. Never before had such a heart rending departure been taken. But duty was duty and although many aboard turned to their details with leaden hearts the ship slowly gathered speed and soon land and family faded in the distance. When minutes meant lives, speed of course was of tremendous impor­tance. Acceleration tables were tossed overboard when the chief engineer said, " to Hell with the score, there'll be no nursing of the engines." Never­theless he opportunely kept an eye on the turbines and computed hourly scores. Ire was overjoyed by the re­sults. " At this rate," he said, " we'll win the engineering competition in a walk." As soon as it was deemed feasible by the Navigator the course was set at 000 0 True. Cognizance was taken of the fact that the ship had to be well to seaward of Coastwise steam­er lanes and any islands as the large bow waves thrown up by the searing speed would have wreaked havoc with shipping or any Coastal community. Any ship would have floundered in the hugh swells. As it was the sensi­tive seismograph at the California Institute of Technology recorded an earthquake disturbance somewhere in the Pacific. -: THE BLUE BONNET :-