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The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 7, No. 1, 1938-07-01
Page 4
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 7, No. 1, 1938-07-01 - Page 4. July 1, 1938. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 18, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/913/show/912.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. (July 1, 1938). The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 7, No. 1, 1938-07-01 - Page 4. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/913/show/912

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 7, No. 1, 1938-07-01 - Page 4, July 1, 1938, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 18, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/913/show/912.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 7, No. 1, 1938-07-01
Alternative Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. VII, No. 1, 1938-07-01
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
  • Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor
  • Bannen, W. J., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Boris, John, circulation
  • Beckwith, R. L., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (Local)
  • Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, California
Date July 1, 1938
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 2
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
Item Description
Title Page 4
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
File Name _0597_L.pdf
Transcript 4 THE BLUE BONNET ---------' i" U. S. S. Houston- j;. 28 · 38- 900. Early Flags ( From Page 1.) In the Navy, Commo­dore Hopkins hoisted the " Don't Tread on Me" flag. It had a background of seven red and six white horizontal stripes superimposed by an undulat­ing rattlesnake's tail at lower left and head at upper right corner with the inscription below. Once submitted in Congress was an all yellow flag wth a coiled rattlesnake ' and same inscrip­tion to be used as Hopkns' personal flag. The " Pine Tree Flag" was frequently used, a flag of sim­ple design consisting of a green pine tree above the motto " An Appeal to Heaven" on a white field. The Merchant and Pri­vateer ensign of our vessels of this period consist solely of the seven red and six white horizontal stripes. The present flag of seven red and six white stripes with the blue field containing the white stars was adopted in Congress on 14 June, 1777. Coincidence has it that in the same hour the orders for John Paul Jones to command the Ranger were passed. Jones liked this flag and was aware of the fact that it had been passed during the same hour. He had never liked the rattlesnake for he dis­liked the thought that a " venomous serpent could be the combatant em­blem of a brave and honest folk, fight­ing to be free." The flag received its first baptism of fire on 3 August, 1777 at the then Fort Stanwick, New York. ..... Honor Him Who Tries IT IS NOT the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood;. who strives valiant­ly, who errs and becomes short again, because there is no effort without shortcoming and error, but who does actually strive to do the deeds, who knows the great enthusiam, the great devotions, who spends himself in a worthy cause. This is he who should be honored! Changes In Officer Personnel ( From Page 1.) Lieut. ( jg) E. C. Long left for China on the first of June well pleased with the new assignment. Ensign G. E. Davis reported aboard the 18th to replace Mr. Long. Lieut. J. A. Holbrook reported to relieve Lieut. Blake. Mr. Blake will be Flag Lieutenant on Admiral Kimmel's staff. In the engineering department there was a detachment and a relief, Lieut. H. K. Gates relieving Lieut. D. J. Mc­Callum, who returned to the far East. Three Houston officers are now out there, Mr. Hilger, Mr. Long, and Mr. McCallum. Just arrived this week are six new ensigns, their names are as follows:- Ens. T. H. Suddath, Ens. T. R. Ingham, Ens. W. C. Leedy, Ens. L. B. . McDonald, Ens. J. C. Jonson, Ens. M. H. Buass. The following changes of duty were made to officer personnel aboard: Lt. ( jg) McDonald shifted from ' A' Div. to 1st Div.; Ens. Meyers from 3rd Div. J. O. to Signal Officer; Ens. J. P. M. Johnston from 1st Div. Officer to 3rd Div. J. O.; Ens. Wengro­vius from Ass't Navigator to Engin­eering Instruction; and Ens. Minter from 4th Div. J. O. to Engineering Instruction. "' 1. I Don't Get It Sailor: " Hey Marine, watch it, the deck's wet." Marine: " That's alright. My shoes don't leak." Whatever trouble Adam had, No man in days of yore Could say when he had told a joke: " I've heard that one before." Stachnik: " There's a certain reason why I love you." She: " My goodness!" Stachnik: " Don't be ridiculous." After all, a Yeoman is only a text book wired for sound. She: Hank isn't as big a fool as he used to be." Ditto: " Then he's geting wiser?" She: " No, thinner." A deep sea diver of the U. S. Navy is well burden­ed by weighty out­fit & equipment. The rubber diving suit a­lone weighs 27 Ibs.; helmet and breastplate 53 pounds; belt 80 pounds, and shoes 28 pounds. His working implements include air driven tools, electric arc burning torch and the hydrogen- oxygen torch, which are effectively used under water. That no watch chains, fobs, pins, or other jewelry shall be worn exposed upon the uniform by enlisted men of the Navy and Marine Corps, except sleeve buttons and shirt studs, as prescribed, and auihorized decorations, medals, ribbons, and hon­orable discharge buttons. That the longest throw ever made with a baseball was 426 feet, 91hinches. That as soon as a man learns how to make a better living by working, he tries to make a better living without working and the losses from his speculations compel him to go back to work. That the volcanos in Ha­waii are not dangerous because they flow, unlike Vesuvius, which explodes. The U. S. Navy maintains 56 complete bands and orchestras with a personnel of 1,045 men, on board ships of the fleet and on shore stations in various parts of the world. To keep these many bands and orches­tras well rounded- out with trained musicians the U. S. Navy maintains a Navy Music School at Washington, D. C. The course of instruction is most thorough and complete and covers a period of two years, after which train­ing is supplemented by additional instruction.