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The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 6, No. 5, 1938-05-07
Page 2
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 6, No. 5, 1938-05-07 - Page 2. May 7, 1938. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 18, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/888/show/885.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. (May 7, 1938). The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 6, No. 5, 1938-05-07 - Page 2. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/888/show/885

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 6, No. 5, 1938-05-07 - Page 2, May 7, 1938, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 18, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/888/show/885.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 6, No. 5, 1938-05-07
Alternative Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. VI, No. 5, 1938-05-07
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
  • Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor
  • Bannen, W. J., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Boris, John, circulation
  • Beckwith, R. L., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Long Beach, California
Date May 7, 1938
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 1
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
Item Description
Title Page 2
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
File Name _0578_L.pdf
Transcript 2------------ -: THE BLUE BONNET :- A weekly publication of the ship's com­pany of the U. S. S. Houston, Captain G. N. Barker, U. S. N., Commanding and Commander C. A. Bailey, U. S. N., Exec­utive Officer. Editor. Lieut. ( jg) E. A. McDonald. Assistant Editor: Ensign J. P. M. Johnston Associate Editor: Stefan Sivak, Jr., SK2c Associate Editor: W. J. Bannen, Sea. lc Cartoonist: W. C. Ridge Circulation: John Boris. Y3c Printer: R. L. Beckwith, Sea. lc - Editorial - Conversation is an art in which a man has all mankind for competition. - EMERSON-NAVY men have been stamped from time immemorial as be­ing colossal bores since the only sub­ject of conversation with which they are familiar is the Navy. Now, while we are not disparaging knowledge of your work, there's no use forcing a full enlistment upon friends and rel­atives, including mothers- in- law. To be sure, they will usually listen po­litely to your gory tales of the roaring main, take your laughter and ridicule of their ignorance of Naval terms with a wry smile, stifle a yawn of en­nui with a fluttering hand, and adroit­ly attempt to switch the topic of con­versation to something else. If their plan is successful and another sub­ject, such as the President's policies, political and military measures in the Japanese conflict, or the European situation, is brought forth for con­sideration, you are left to flounder in a conversational maelstrom of a type you know nothing of. If the mountans would not come to Mohammed, Mohammed went to the mountain. If conversa­tion isn't within your tiny, narrow, begoted orbit, you'll have to increase your orbit so as to include more ex­tensive fields. Remember that no mat­ter how important the Navy is, or how important you think it is, it is not the center of the universe about which all must revolve. When people mention Chiang Kaishek, do you mutter, " yes, he is a Chinese laundryman, isn't he? Now when I was on the Tuscaroara in 29 ...." Your verbal opponents undoubtedly throw in the towel at this point, settle down with a pained THE BLUE BONNET The Pantless Gunner Of Panay Commend me to that noble soul Who, in the battle's heat, Rushed to his post without his pants, The bomber's dive to meet; Who stood upon the rocking deck In careless disattire, With shirt tail flaunting in the breeze, To deal out fire for fire. Old Glory's color deepened As she floated o'er thi.! son- The man who had no time for pants But plenty for his gun. Come, name a million heroes, But to me there'll never be A finer show of nerve or grit On any land or sea - Then dwell upon your epics Should you feel an urge for chantlii, Recall the sinking Panay And the gunner minus pants! - Vaun Al Arnold. The above poem has appeared in most of the ship's papers in the fleet. and we deem it proper that such a ballad should find its way into our Blue Bonnet also. Those of you who saw new' reels of the bombing of the Panay will no doubt recall the pantless guner, as he stood there in his shirt tail, returning the fire. ....... We're Crazy . . . . There are meters of aceent, There are meters of tone, But the best way to meter, Is to meter alone. There are letters of accent, There are letters of tone, But the best way to letter Is to letter alone. ....... expresion, mentally award you the leather medal for the biggest bore of the century, and vow not to be in the next time you come to call. Do a little outside read. ing when you can't make up your mind whether to go ashore or not. The Reader's Digest and similiar publica­tions are strongly recommended as a foundation upon which to place your stores of current events gleaned from daiy persual of the newspapers. In­crease your conversational orbit by finding out what is happening in this old world of ours and you'll find that your coming will be heralded instead of bemoaned. Our Hospital Ships A brief glance at the history of employment of hospital ships during the past 75 years will reveal that no first- class nation will carryon a ma­jor war without employing hospital ships to serve the Fleet. The United States Navy's floating hospital, U. S. S. Relief, only hospital ship attached to the Fleet, takes care of the sick and injured personnel of the ships of the Navy. The Relief, placed in commission on 28 December, 1920, is the first ship of any navy in the world to be built as a hospital ship, is named after the first Relief, a converted vessel which served as a hospital ship during Ute Spanish­American War, the Philippine Insur­rection, and the Chinese Boxer Up­rising. The present Relief is 483 feet long, 60 feet wide, has a displacement of 9800 tons, cruising speed of ten knots and a cruising radius of 15,000 miles. Though smaller than the average hos­pital ashore, it is equipped to handle 360 cases and 500 cases in an emer­gency. This is more than the average hos­pital can handle. No less than ten medical officers, three dental officers, twelve nurses and 118 men of the hospital corps, who act as technical assistants, minister to 2200 patients each year. About six new patients are received aboard the Relief each day for treat­ment of everything from broken legs, colds, burns, and aching teeth to the more serious diseases. One or more urgical'operations are performed ev­ery day; 4417 major and 566 minor operations were performed last year. Only 3 out of 1000 die, while 20.5 per cent are transferred to shore hospitals and 70.72 per cent recover within 30 days. The Relief has the most modern equipment that is ob­tainable and is ranked with the lead­ing hospitals of the country. The Relief is the only ship in the Navy which has women as regular members of the ship's complement. They are members of the Navy Nurse Corps. These nurses are seagoing and travel aboard the Relief as the ship accompanies the Fleet. The tour of duty aboard the hospital ship is very desirable and for one year only.