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The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 5, No. 6, 1938-02-12
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 5, No. 6, 1938-02-12 - Page 2. February 12, 1938. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 18, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/843/show/840.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor. (February 12, 1938). The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 5, No. 6, 1938-02-12 - Page 2. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/843/show/840

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 5, No. 6, 1938-02-12 - Page 2, February 12, 1938, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 18, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/843/show/840.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 5, No. 6, 1938-02-12
Alternative Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. V, No. 6, 1938-02-12
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Ball, R. C., assistant editor
  • Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor
  • Thompson, R. B., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Boris, John, circulation
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Long Beach, California
Date February 12, 1938
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 1
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
Item Description
Title Page 2
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
File Name _0546_L.pdf
Transcript Page 2 THE BLUE BONNET -: THE BLUE BONNET : - ( From Page 1.) ( Continued on page 4.) Dear Sal, Time's been a. flyin' like green wat­er through tha scuppers on its way back to tha briny since I put my hand to writin' matter. But us Navies shure been a bearin' down hard durin' this season ' stead 0' patchin' up harness and tools like you uns do back on your places. Please be a forgivin' a body for his forgettin' ways, Sal, ' cause my heart stills warms a mite for you. And if you haven't traipsed up tha middle 0' Squire Mn1truck's preachin' house with that no account Felix Jackson a danglin' you on his arm you can do me a pert heap 0' good by sendin' me writ­in matter. ' Member that little squirt, Exodus Jones, who allus had to drape tha 01' schoo1' 3 dunce cap over his no account ears at school whenever his Pa could spare him from chorin'? Tha hanker­in' 0' tha sea musta ate into his bones so or his old man musta been larrup­in' tha tar outa his onery hide again - - - - - anyway, bein' past tha consent age he joined up with tha Navy for a hitch ' cause I ran smack dab into tha critter tha other day. He was peelin' tators on tha spud pile. Exodus got up when he saw me a buggin' my eyes out at him. " Gus, you all heah too?" Seein' he was down in tha dumps and not wishin' to say more ' count 0' puttin' more bilge water on his spirits I only said, " yes." He looked so sad. After a spell he s011; a slithered down and took to blub­berin'. " Fust, they axed me to walk ' round with a & quirrelin' piece. They took to makin' me sleep in a swingin' bed. Now they got me a doin' female work - - - - - and no pone or pot lik­ker to put in a body's belly. I was rais­ed on ' em eatin's." " Yeah," said I, hittin' him ' cross * * * * S END the BLUE BONNET to the folks at home. life and practiced law in Springfield, Illinois, in partnership with his old friend, Major John T. Stuart. In 1846 Lincoln again returned to public life upon being elected to the House of Representatives where he served one term. In 1858 he debated the Slavery Question with Stephen A. Douglas in the latter's successful campaign for reelection to the U. S. Senate. Two years later the new Republi­can party met in convention at Chi­cago to nominate their presidential candidate. The favorite was Senator William H. Seward of New York who was later to be Secretary of State in Lincoln's cabinet, but due to his great political prominence, the party lead­ers were afraid to nominate him and nominated Lincoln instead, who, tho little known outside of his own state had a solid reputation of many years standing for sincerity, frankness and honesty. In the election that followed, Lincoln would have been badly de­feated had it not been that the Dem­ocratic vote was divided between two candidates, so it seems that fate in­terceded at this critical time and pro­vided the Union with this kindly, country lawer who was destined to be one of our greatest leaders. Many volumes have been written on the civil war, its campaigns, and the life of Lincoln, but there is no room for further comment on them here. Rather, I would like to suggest that, whether familiar with it or not, you take the necessary few minutes and look up " Lincoln's Gettysburg Ad­dress." You will be richly rewarded. It was delivered November 19th, 1863, at the dedication of a memorial on the Battlefield at Gettysburg, Penn. When the war was over Lincoln stood steadfast in defence of the South against those of the North who would plunder it. " Enough lives have been sacrificed, we must extinguish our resentments," he said at what was to be his last cabinet meeting. But Lincoln's star had already set, he was shot while attending a per­formance in Ford's theater the even­ing of April 14th, 1865 and died the following day. Cireulation: John Borla, Y3c A weekly publication of the ahip's company of the U. S. S. Houston, Captain G. N. Barker, U. S. N., Commanding and Commaltder C. A. Bailey, U. S. N., Executive Officer. Editor, Lieut. ( jg) E. A. McDonald, U. S. N. Assistant Editor: R. C. Ball, Ch. Pay Clerk Associate Editors: Stefan Sivak, Jr., SK2c R. B. Thompson, SK3c Cartoonist: W. C. Ridge Abraham Lincoln In 1834 Lincoln was elected to the Illinois legislature where he served un­til 1841 when he retired from public 12 February, 1936 against the Indians under BlackHawk, the war chief of the Sacs. Lincoln joined a volunteer company and to his own surprize was elected captain. On April 21, 1832, the company was organized at Richmond, Sangamon County, and on April 28 was inspected and mustered into service at Beards­town and attached to Colonel Samuel Thompson's regiment, the Fourth Illi­nois Mounted Volunteers. the cam­paign produced no serious fighting and the volunteers not being enlisted for any specified period of time be­came anxious to be mustered out of service which was done on May 27 by orders of the Governor. Not wish­ing to weaken his forces before the arrival of new troops already enroute, the Governor called for volunteers to remain in service for twenty days lon­ger. Therefore, on the same day on which he was mustered out as a cap­tain, Lincoln reenlisted as a private in Captain TIes company of mounted volunteers, organizeld , pri­marily for scouting service. Other officers who imitated this patriotic example were General Whiteside and Major John T. Stuart with whom Lincoln later prac­ticed law. Captain TIes' company was mustered out of service on June 16, 1832 after having faithfully perform­ed its duties, and Lincoln returned to New Salem. During the election the August following, he was defeated in the campaign for election to the leg­islature. This is the only time he was ever defeated on a direct vote of the people.