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The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 4, No. 18, 1937-05-01
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Mackenzie, C. J., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Hall, A. D., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 4, No. 18, 1937-05-01 - Page 2. May 1, 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 3, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/649/show/646.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackenzie, C. J., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Hall, A. D., associate editor. (May 1, 1937). The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 4, No. 18, 1937-05-01 - Page 2. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/649/show/646

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackenzie, C. J., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Hall, A. D., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 4, No. 18, 1937-05-01 - Page 2, May 1, 1937, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 3, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/649/show/646.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 4, No. 18, 1937-05-01
Alternative Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. IV, No. XVIII, 1937-05-01
Creator (Local)
  • Mackenzie, C. J., editor
  • Ball, R. C., assistant editor
  • Hall, A. D., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Meuhlen, B. M., distribution
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (Local)
  • Lahaina Roads, Maui, Hawaii
Date May 1, 1937
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 10
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
Item Description
Title Page 2
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
File Name _0425_L.pdf
Transcript Page Two -: THE BLUE BONNET :- A weekly publication, published by the . hip'. company of the U. S. S. HOUSTON, Captain G. E. Baker, U. S. N., Commandin~ and Com­mander P. K. Robottom, U. S. N., Executive Officer. EDITOR, Ensi~ n C. J. Mackenzie Asst. Editor: R. C. Ball, Ch. Pay Clerk Associate Editor: A. D. HaJJ, MMlc Distribution: B. M. Meuhlen, Bu~ ler 1 May, 1937. NATIVE COWBOYS RIDE 500,000 ACRE RANCH Palm lined coasts, tropical verdure, beautiful birds, lava flows and seeth­ing volcanoes- this is the average conception of the Paradise Isles of the Pacific. Somehow cattle ranches and cowboys don't fit into the picture; but strange as it seems, the island of Hawaii has one of the largest ranches of its kind in the world, and cowboys still ride the l'ange-- the grassy slopes of Mauna Kea, highest mountain in the Pacific. This ranch was started in 1793. Un­til white men came to Hawaii the na­tives had never seen a cow or a horse. In 1793 an English adventurer named Vancouver, on a voyage around the world, brought to Hawaii with him a few head of longhorn cattle he had secured in California. These he pre­sented to Kamehameha I. The Hawai­ian monarch, imbued with the prac­tice of tabu, released the cattle on the grassy slopes of Mauna Kea and for­bade his people from killing any of them. The cattle ran wild, multiplied, and soon stocked the range. In 1815 a New Englland sailor, John Parker, tired of the sea, settled in Hawaii. Parker found opportunity a­waiting him. He had but to claim the decendents of Vancouver's cattle and they were his. e did so forthwit , and his descendants have carried on his original ranch for over one hun­dred years. Today it totals almost 500,000 acres and employes about two hundred and fifty real cowboys, all native Hawaiians. In 1899 Alfred Carter became man­ager of the Parker Ranch, and intro­duced the breeding of purebred here­fords, then being recognized as the best of all breeds to forage for them­selves on the open range. Today there are on the Parker Ranch some 32,000 ( Continued on page four) THE BLUE BONNET Dear Sal, Your lovin' missive sure knocked tha props from under my agin' car­cass, and if I live to pound pitch for tha rest 0' my years tha old blood pumpin' organ will ne'er leap so high again. They got some mighty big home­steads all a flutter with wavin' sugar cane out here on these sun kissed is­lands 0' tha great Pacific. As far as ya can stretch your peepers great gusts 0' green calm and starve out tha misery in a body's soul. Then, there's fish 0' tha sea they call Kaaawa, a choice morsel as ever passed tha smilin' pearls 0' damsels or tha shriveled dentine hags 0' old lasses. But they slapped an alias on that poor creature, because when a body gets a pronouncin' each letter slow and distinct, like tha grass- wear­in' natives do, it sounds like a body's callin' hogs in a thunderstorm without a set 0' uppers. Of pineapples; and they dinna grow on trees, Sal; they's many many 0' tha fruit. We chawed on a few for breakfast. Makes me think 0' tha time brothel' Vern swallowed a peck 0' green parsimmons from our pet tree in the upper forty. His mouth was a lookin' like a pretzel a come to life from a two- bit drunk, and he drained most 0' tha well dry from untwistin' tha runnin' bowline in his stomach. They says, a ody eats o< Jmany- o' green pineapples, it'll do tha same, so I'm bein' as timorous as a body can be in that respect. But they're mighty scrumptious and pleasin' to tha palate. Better use another Pen than that one Felix gave ya. Bet it already scratches worsin' a mangy dog in a cyclone 0' fleas. Ya can tell him he better take his arm from around your waist or I'll be on him like a thunderin' herd. Love, Gus. DESCRIPTION OF THE , ISLANDS The Hawaiian Islands ( distance tab­ulated from Honolulu) are 2,091 miles from San Francisco; 2,345 miles from Victoria; 2,228 miles from Los An­geles; 3,394 miles from Yokohama; 4,939 miles from Hongkong; 2,263 miles from Samoa; 3,820 miles from Auckland, 4,420 miles from Sydney. The Hawaiian Islands have a land area of 6,405 square mile-- greater than the combined areas of Connecti­cut and Rhode Island. The population of the Territory of Hawaii is 380,211. Honolulu, principal port and capi­tal city of the Territory, is located on Oahu Island. By steamer it is five days from San Francisco, Los An­geles, or Vancouver; eight days from Yokohama; eleven days from Shang­hai; five days from Samoa; eleven days from Auckland; two weeks from Sydney. Kauai ( pronounced " kow- eye") is the smallest of the four main islands. It is a hundred miles from Honolulu - an overnight trip by steamer or an hour and a half by passenger plane. Hawaii ( pronounced " hah- vy- ee" or " hah- wy- ee") is the largest island of the archipelago. It is two hundred miles from Honolulu- an overnight trip by steamer or two and a half hours by passenger plane. Maui ( pronounced " mow- ee) is the second largest island. It is seventy miles from Honolulu- a six- hour trip by steamer or an hour by passenger plane. Molokai, between Maui and Oahu, is a sparsley populated island devoted to ranching, pineapple raising and Ha­waiian homesteads. It is connected with Honolulu by steamer and airplane service. Lanai is a small island south of 0 okai devotea en: t1m to pine­apple raising. Highest altitude in the Islands is Mauna Kea, 13,825 feet high, on Hawaii Island, Mountain peaks on other islands reach an altitude of 10, 032 feet on Maui; 5,170 on Kauai; and 4,030 feet on Oahu. ... ,. Mr. Kalb: " You hammer nails like lightening." Shaw: " You mean I'm fast?" Mr. Kalb: " No, you never strike twice in the same place."