Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 3, No. 39, 1936-10-10
Page 4
File size: 634 KB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Mackenzie, C. J., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; O'Brien, R. W., associate editor; Osborne, W. H., exchange editor. The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 3, No. 39, 1936-10-10 - Page 4. October 10, 1936. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 20, 2022. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/519/show/518.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackenzie, C. J., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; O'Brien, R. W., associate editor; Osborne, W. H., exchange editor. (October 10, 1936). The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 3, No. 39, 1936-10-10 - Page 4. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/519/show/518

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackenzie, C. J., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; O'Brien, R. W., associate editor; Osborne, W. H., exchange editor, The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 3, No. 39, 1936-10-10 - Page 4, October 10, 1936, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 20, 2022, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/519/show/518.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 3, No. 39, 1936-10-10
Alternative Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. III, No. XXXIX, 1936-10-10
Creator (Local)
  • Mackenzie, C. J., editor
  • Ball, R. C., assistant editor
  • O'Brien, R. W., associate editor
  • Osborne, W. H., exchange editor
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Long Beach, California
Date October 10, 1936
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 9
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
Item Description
Title Page 4
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
File Name _0339_L.pdf
Transcript Page Four, THE GYRO COMPAS, S The gyro- compass is an instrument invented and developed in compara­tively recent years. It was the outcome of an increasing need for a reliable compass which would not be subject to the troubles caused by the larger and larger masses of steel in ships. As gyroscopes and gyroscopic re­actions became better understood, ex­periments along these lines resulted, finally, in the successful application of the gyroscope to obtain a compass that would indicate geographic north, and at the same time be immune from the magnetic disturbances inevitable on all ships of steel. In 1911 the compass which now has had the widest adopt­ion in shipping successfully completed trials, first on a merchant ship operat­ing between New York and Norfolk, Va., and then in the powder magazine of a torpedo boat destroyer. It was installed on a U. S. battieship and two " repeater" compasses were elec­trically connected to it, one used for steering and the other for taking bearings. It was soon found that the gyro- compass, on account of its in­tegrity and its refusal to take up any of the yawing movements of the ship, afforded a base line from which gra­phic records could be made and turret guns controlled. Eventually the master gyro- compass became a most im­portant factor of the gun control system. After the first successful trials, gyro- compasses were rapidly installed on battleships and suuma­rines throughout the U. S. Navy, and were further taken up by the British, Japanese, French, Italian and Russian navies in the order named; in the years following the war, the gyro- com­pass was also adopted by a majority of the important merchant fleets thru­out the world. In addition to the compass mention­ed above, which is manufactured by the Sperry Gyroscopic company in Brooklyn, a gyro- compass is a Iso manufactured by the Anschutz com­pany in Germany. Still later there has appeared a compass manufactur­ed by S. G. Brown in Great Britian and still more recently one made by the Alma company in New York. With each, the operation is based upon the same fundamental principles, the me­thod in which the gyroscopic element ( from which the compass obtains its THE BLUE BONNET directive force) is suspended being the chief difference. The Anschutz com­pass employs the flotation method, the Brown the so- called " oil pump" me­thod, and the Alma the flotation me­thod; while with the Sperry compass the weight of the sensitive element is supported by a mechanical method. The compass first mentioned above consists, essentially, of a gyro wheel driven at moderately high speed by electricity, its auxiliary · parts and compass card all supported in gimbals in a suitable housing or binnacle. The compass is in reality built up around the gyro wheel. When the compass is functioning normally, its spinning axis will lie in line with the true north- south meridian. On vessels the master gyro- compass is usually placed below decks in a clean and dry compartment. A steer­ing repeater fitted with a reading glass is located beside the ship's wheel and adjusted to suit the convenience of the helmsman. Bearing repeaters are mounted on the port and starboard wings of the bridge, and a repeater is often placed aft at the emergency steering station. Repeaters with bulk­head mounting may be used in the captain's stateroom and in the radio room, and if the ship is equipped with a radio direction finder, a repeater compass is almost always used in con­junction with it to obtain accurate radio beari~ gs. The course recorder is located in the chartroom, where its record is available for inspection at all times by the captain and officers of the ship. While a magnetic compass is still standard equipment on every vessel, it is fast coming to be con­sidered simply as a standby in case anything should go wrong with the gyro. The gyro- compass is an instru­ment capable of withstanding consider­able rough treatment. It is not affect­ed by the vibration of the ship's en­gines on acount of the resilient sup­port of the gyro. The gyro is like­wise carefully balanced in such a way that it is not affected by the roll­ing and pitching of the ship. • • DEWEY'S GUNBOAT SAVED --::-- The old Navy gunboat Boston, of Admiral Dewey's fleet in the Spanish­American war, was saved from the scrap heap recently by government order. The veteran craft will be tak­en to Yerba Brena Island. USS Houston- lO- lO- 36- 900. ADMIRAL SIMS ( Continued From Page One) --::-- Admiral Sims retired thirteen years ago at 64 years of age, and for some years continued helpful, if cau­stic, comment on naval affairs. The Navy- and the nation- owes him a debt of gratitude. - Los Angeles Times • • CINCUS NIGHT SCHOOL INFO. ---::-- ( Continued From Page One) --::-- partment of the City Schools will furnish instructors and some equip­ment for use here in the Y. M. C. A. Building, and other courses will be given in various school buildings in the city. Men, desiring to have in­formation about these subjects and to make a preliminary registration, may do so with us at any time. Be­low is a list of some of the subjects which are suggested as of probable interest to Navy men and others may be provided if there is sufficient de­mand for them: Mathematics, Shorthand and Typ­ing, Radio instruction, Theory and Ad­vanced Radio Code, Photography, Spanish, English, Public Speaking, ArChitecture, and Diesel Motors." • •• A PRAYER --::-- Our fathers who are in California, Hollywood be thy name. Thy cinemas come, Thy stills be dumb in Los Angeles as in New Haven. Give us this day our daily news reel And forgive us our censorship, As we forgive those who show double features before us. Lead us not into musical comedies, But deliver us from Wild Westerns, For thine is the King Kong, the Pow-ell, and the Gloria Swanson, For ever and ever, ah me! - Stanford Chapparal. ••• Joe ( to manager) - This soup, I can't eat it. Manager- I'll take care of it at once. Call the Chef. Joe ( to chef) - Dammit, I can't eat this soup. Chef- What's the matter with it? Joe- Nothing, only I ain't got a spoon.