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The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 2, No. 43, 1935-11-05
Page 2
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Mackenzie, C. J., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Murphy, W. C., assistant editor; O'Brien, R. W., associate editor; Osborne, W. H., exchange editor. The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 2, No. 43, 1935-11-05 - Page 2. November 5, 1935. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 20, 2022. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/314/show/311.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackenzie, C. J., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Murphy, W. C., assistant editor; O'Brien, R. W., associate editor; Osborne, W. H., exchange editor. (November 5, 1935). The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 2, No. 43, 1935-11-05 - Page 2. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/314/show/311

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackenzie, C. J., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Murphy, W. C., assistant editor; O'Brien, R. W., associate editor; Osborne, W. H., exchange editor, The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 2, No. 43, 1935-11-05 - Page 2, November 5, 1935, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 20, 2022, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/314/show/311.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 2, No. 43, 1935-11-05
Alternative Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. II, No. XLIII, 1935-11-05
Creator (Local)
  • Mackenzie, C. J., editor
  • Ball, R. C., assistant editor
  • Murphy, W. C., assistant editor
  • O'Brien, R. W., associate editor
  • Osborne, W. H., exchange editor
Contributor (Local)
  • McNesby, H. R. M.
  • Standafar, S. D.
  • Readette, P. E.
  • Kitchen, H. E.
  • Glider, N. R.
  • Baker, G. W., printer
  • Boris, John, printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (Local)
  • New York Naval Shipyard
Date November 5, 1935
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 6
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
Item Description
Title Page 2
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
File Name _0195_L.pdf
Transcript Page Two. THE BLUE BONNET -: THE BLUE BONNET :- OVEMBER 5, 1935 A " eekly pubUeaUoll, . ubllahM " y tit. ut..• eomp. ny of the U. S. 8. HOUSTON. C&~ lain G. E. Bak. r. U. 8. N.. c........... . nd Comm. nder P. L ..... « e.. U••• N. E: neutln Ollleer. En. hrn C. J. Haekend•• IUltor. A. it. Editor, Ro C. BaIl. Ch. pay Clark Lt. Comdr. R. W. Shrum, ( ChC) Ena. W. C. Murphy A..... ei. te Editor RoW. O'Brlen, BHle. EIc! h. nl'e Editor W. H. O. borne Y3e. CONTRIBUTORS H. R. Me eoby, AOMlc. S. D. St. ndafer, Seale. Rudelle P. E., RMlc. Kitchen H. E. Cpl. . R. Glider Sic. PRINTERS The San BIas Indian is reputed to be one of the pur'est aboriginal trains in America. He is very proud of his race and, unlike other Indian tribes, he has been careful to keep his blood stream pure. The male is short of stature, sel­dom being over five feet in height. He is stockily built, having broad should­ers, a deep barrel chest and a short stocky neck. His hips are narrow and his leg are well proportioned. He has the high cheek bone, straight black hair and copper colored skin so characteristic of the American In­dain. His nose is flat and very broad. The female has much the same chara­cteristics of the male, lacking the broad shoulder . They all had quite g- ood figure. one of the males or females were fat and all carried them­selves well. The men dress in store made trou­s rs and hirts. The women however ad the picturesque touch by wearing a compl x designed and white patch­work dr ss usually bordered and top­p d by yellow, black, or green cloth. An endless amount of work seems to b put in these dresses. Women the world over are never satisfied with the faces God g- ave them. These wo­men do not depend so much on cos­m tic' a do our American women, althoug- h they do use a small amount of rouge on their cheek , but rather on a triang- ular shaped brass ring in their noses; large ear rings, two to four in­ches in diameter, made of gold; a scar running the entire length of their nose and a band of stringed beads some two inches wide wrapped tight­ly around their ankles. The ear rings ._ 1. The folks at home will enjoy read­ing the BLUE BONNET. Mail it. ...... lIIary had a little plane In which she liked to frisk Now wasn't that an awful shame Her little • • • • • • •••• clothes on. Now and then the side walls are decorated with posters of bright colors advertising an old cine­ma that has probably been picked up in Panama or left by some trader who occasionally stops to buy coconuts. Some of the huts have a lean- to at­tached that is used as a community kitchen by several families occupying the shack. These homes are located in a helter skelter fashion in most of the villages; but, in some they are arranged in an orderly fashion with a main street running the width of the village. The daily meal which is cooked over an open fire seems to consist mostly of boiled fish, grated coconuts, bananas and plantains. Corn, grain and pOl'k must sometimes vary the diet because corn and millet can be seen drying in every village. A small vari­ety of pigs which are kept in small pens are also een. Now and then an occasional chicken also is seen. Although the only flooring is the natural sand of the islands, the dwel­lings appeared to be remarkably clean. As a matter of fact the entire island gave one the impression of being re­markably free from filth and dirt. The chief recreation of the children seems to be playing in the water. Little tots who were hardly old enough to walk could be seen paddling about in dugout canoes. Sailing also seemed to occupy a dreat deal of their time. Graceful sailing canoes could be seen all over the bay. The men and boys seemed quite skilled in the use of the bow and arrow. On our first visit we saw boys in canoes shoot pelicans at a distance of fifty yards. At each place we visited they seem­ed quite willing to trade or sell any­thing they owned with the excepion of the ear plates and the rings that the women wore in their noses. They value their trinkets quite highly from a monetary point of view; but, it was surpri ing what a bar of soap or a pack of cigarettes would bring in trade. The author got a wonderful three foot sailing model of a schooner for an old green shirt. Anything with color in it seemed to catch their eye. or rather ear- plates, Jem to indicate a distinct social status. The beads on their ankles are worn to preserve a shapely ankle in the same manner as the Chinese women bind their feet to keep them small. Acording to what we could gather from the Indian themselves, the scar was to ward off sickness and evil spirits; but, other authorities say that it is part of their religion. The women refused to pose before a camera. They would run at the sight of one. They didn't seem to be afraid of the camera but hid rather as an act of modesty. F01' no amount of persuasion or gifts would they stand before the evil machine. The men and small boys, however, made no fuss about having their pictures taken. They all seemed very happy and jolly. In fact they would laugh at the slight­est excuse. The small boys until the age of nine or ten go stark naked. The little girls on the other hand are dressed in much the same manner as their mother from the day they first walk. It is estimated that there are some 35,000 of these San BIas Indians liv­ing in these various island villages which stretch for some hundred miles along the Panamanian coast. The group vi ited by the HOUSTO party is known as the Cartai Islands. Each group of these flat low- lying i lands is governed by a chief, with a local sub- chief on each island. Each of these islands is located about a mile off the mainland from which they car­ry their drinking water in dug- out canoes. On this mainland they also carryon what little agriculture they engage in. Thi consi ts in growing a small amount of corn and millet. The islands themselve are used only for dwelling, outside of a few scattered trees there are nothing but dwellings. The huts themselves which are made of bamboo side wall. and thached roofs vary in size from 10xlO to 2" x 20 feet. They are located only a few feet apart with hardly walking space between one house and the next. Each of these huts seem to house some four 01' five families. The insides of the huts are perfectly bare of furni­ture. Hammocks are used to sleep in. These hammock are slung between the uprights that support the roof. There is also usually a rack made of a cross pole with pegs in it to hang John Bori8, Se. 2e. THE* SA BL* AS IND* IANS G. W. Baker, Sea2c.