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The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 2, No. 19, 1935-05-18
Page 4
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Berkley, J. B., editor; Mackenzie, C. J., assistant editor; O'Brien, R. W., associate editor; Holt, Jack, associate editor; Bly, R. E., division editor. The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 2, No. 19, 1935-05-18 - Page 4. May 18, 1935. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 17, 2022. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/199/show/198.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Berkley, J. B., editor; Mackenzie, C. J., assistant editor; O'Brien, R. W., associate editor; Holt, Jack, associate editor; Bly, R. E., division editor. (May 18, 1935). The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 2, No. 19, 1935-05-18 - Page 4. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/199/show/198

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Berkley, J. B., editor; Mackenzie, C. J., assistant editor; O'Brien, R. W., associate editor; Holt, Jack, associate editor; Bly, R. E., division editor, The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 2, No. 19, 1935-05-18 - Page 4, May 18, 1935, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 17, 2022, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/199/show/198.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 2, No. 19, 1935-05-18
Alternative Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. II, No. XIX, 1935-05-18
Creator (Local)
  • Berkley, J. B., editor
  • Mackenzie, C. J., assistant editor
  • O'Brien, R. W., associate editor
  • Holt, Jack, associate editor
  • Bly, R. E., division editor
Contributor (Local)
  • LaTour, L. K., reporter
  • Selen, O. R., reporter
  • Razlaff, T. B., printer
  • Battle, J. H., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (Local)
  • At Sea
Date May 18, 1935
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 5
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
Item Description
Title Page 4
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
File Name _0127_L.pdf
Transcript Pace Four " V" DIVISION Allowed 20 men, the division can rarely muster that many. Four pilots and two gunnery observers fills out the officer compliment. Four scouting seaplanes with all gunnery, radio, and navigation equipment with nec­essary spares are carried aboard. The division is entirely ship based but can quickly be placed ashore with squad­ron organization and operate either as a landplane or seaplane unit. The port hangar, both catapult towers, and the starboard hangar mezzanine deck are spaces alloted to the " V" Division. While on board ship the unit is under orders of the Commanding Officer, but ashore or in squadron tactics it is under orders of the Squad­ron Comman. der. Each year pilots and observers, as well as part of the other personnel, are required to fire machine gulfs for qualification. Pilots fire a bombing practice. Pilots and observers must be proficient radio operators and able navigators. Al­though the primary military ~ uty is scouting and gunnery observation, mail carrying, towillg, etc., are other tasks that the aviation branch falls heir to. Plane upkeep is the most engrossing task requiring frequent checks, overhaul, preservation, and repairs to m~ intain the aircraft fit for service and safe to return the pilot to the ship. The success of each flight depends upon the preparations made by the ground crews. The " V" Division, contrary to common belief, is not a " soft" spot but is as busy and probably more thorough in its work than any other aboard. If you get into . _, " tandby for plenty of sweating even into late hours of the night. -- w-- The Blue Bonnet takes this oppor­tunity to congratulate Lieutenant ( jg) James M. Robinson who has re­ceived his commission as Lieutenant. Fine work and more stripes in the near future, Lieutenant. -- w- Is it true that Ensign Murphy, our jovial J. O. does not ( repeat not) contemplate matrimony in the near future? - w- Elderly lady ( on first sea voyage): " Captain, is this a good ship?" Captain: " Why, madam, don't you know this is her maiden voyage?" THE BLUE BONNET OLD HAWAIIAN CUSTOMS To be well- bred as an Hawaiian one must not sit on another's bed and most certainly not on another's clo­thes trunk because it would be con­sidered the height of rudeness to sit upon the intimate covering of anoth­er's person. Never touch anyone's head for the head of anyone is sac­red and it is kapu to touch it, even in play. • When entering a house, do not stand in the doorway and do not sit dow in the doorway. Only the owner of the house has that privilege. After entering a house, one may sit near the door if one so desires. When calling upon a chief, do not address him until you are spoken to. Do not ask for a lei that is worn by another person; that is the height of rudeness. But if the person wear­ing the lei spontaneously offers it and places it around yeur neck, that is quite proper and a great compli­ment to receive it. for that would b. a sincere expression of one's aloha. One should not give away a lei that is personally made for one; for each blossom that is strung holds a loving thought for you; it is almost like a rosary. Hawaiians in the olden days carried their leis from island to is­land. At sea the leis are placed in a ti leaf basket formed by the plant folded back from the stem where the leis are placed to keep fresh. --~*- ­NOSEY NEWS under by the weaker sex? " Wop" Guguelette expects to stage a come­back in the near future, " so he says" Good luck. H. N. Smith just broke up with a " sweetie" here in- Diego. " I wonder why?" Old " Sarge" is just cruising along nicely after his ups and downs. Just who is this " Root" ( Ruth to you) anyway? The cox­swain of the Secretary of Navy · s barge knows. " Me tinks she lives in Shanty Town." " Frenchie" has no statements for the press, tho' he says. There have been rumors that he has been traveling " incognito" in Long Beach. There are only two men now in the division, that put the ship in com­mission, EIland and Kremensky. Svendberg and Ditzek came aboard just before she sailed for China. By the' way Ditzek, claims the distinc- USS Houston- 5- 18- 35- 800. WHY " V" DIVISION fully used. In 1913 aircraft was first used in connection with fleet opera­tions for scouting the Cuban coast during maneuvers. In 1914 the first naval air station was established at Pensacola, Florida on the site of the abandoned navy yard. About this time a definite aviation policy was develop­ed by a board specially appointed for that purpose. With the advent of the World War aviation development proceeded with gigantic steps. Scouting became only one of the numerous missions to be filled by the aeronautical branch of the naval service. At the time of the signing of the Armistice a total of 37,409 officers and men were in train­ing and 17,524 were in active service in the war zone cooperating with the Army and foreign services. New types of machines had been developed. Training from short elementary cour­ses assumed college curriculum pro­portions. Schools and bases dotted the country. Aviation was no longer a miracle but a well organized func­tion in our everyday life. That in brief is how naval aviation grew to be a part of the Navy. Its development has been steadily up­grade until today it plays a role in naval activities as important as those played by destroyers, crui; ers, sub­marines, and battleships. --*-*-- THE STORY OF MAN ( Condensed) The WorId was created. Man was created and placed in the Garden of Eden. He ate; he slept. While he was asleep God created oman out of his rib ( the crookedest part of man) ­Thus man's first sleep became his last repose. Woman married man- para­dise lost. There was no other man in the Garden so Woman flirted with the Devil. When man came home late from the Garden she raised Cain. Then did it again when she got Abel. Consequently man will now give a WOJIlan everything but his seat in a street car. And I ask you - what would you have done for a red apple? tion of being the only man on the ship who has sailed around the Horn and says he rates spitting windward. A few plore plankeys are Phalon, La­tour, Gardner, and Selen. A few 1932 models are Stillings, Rounds, Grigi­litte, Smith and Fossie.