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The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 2, No. 19, 1935-05-18
Page 2
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Berkley, J. B., editor; Mackenzie, C. J., assistant editor; O'Brien, R. W., associate editor; Holt, Jack, associate editor; Bly, R. E., division editor. The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 2, No. 19, 1935-05-18 - Page 2. May 18, 1935. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 17, 2022. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/199/show/194.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Berkley, J. B., editor; Mackenzie, C. J., assistant editor; O'Brien, R. W., associate editor; Holt, Jack, associate editor; Bly, R. E., division editor. (May 18, 1935). The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 2, No. 19, 1935-05-18 - Page 2. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/199/show/194

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Berkley, J. B., editor; Mackenzie, C. J., assistant editor; O'Brien, R. W., associate editor; Holt, Jack, associate editor; Bly, R. E., division editor, The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 2, No. 19, 1935-05-18 - Page 2, May 18, 1935, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 17, 2022, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/199/show/194.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 2, No. 19, 1935-05-18
Alternative Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. II, No. XIX, 1935-05-18
Creator (Local)
  • Berkley, J. B., editor
  • Mackenzie, C. J., assistant editor
  • O'Brien, R. W., associate editor
  • Holt, Jack, associate editor
  • Bly, R. E., division editor
Contributor (Local)
  • LaTour, L. K., reporter
  • Selen, O. R., reporter
  • Razlaff, T. B., printer
  • Battle, J. H., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (Local)
  • At Sea
Date May 18, 1935
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 5
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
Item Description
Title Page 2
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
File Name _0125_L.pdf
Transcript Page Two THE BLUE BONNET -: THE BLUE BONNET :- WHY " V" DIVISION EXECUTIVE OFFICERS RELIEF SECRETARY ROOSEVELT ARRIVES, --*.*-- Send the BLUE BONNET home. A .. eeklT publication, published bT the ship's companT of the U. S. S. HOUSTON Captain W. B. Wooclson. U. S. N., Command­inlr and COllllllander F. D. Hanocl<, U. S. N., Executive Officer. Lt. ( jlr) J. B. BerkleT. Editor. Enlilrn C. J. MackenKie, A..' t. Editor Anodat. Editoro RoW. O'Brien, BMle Jack Holt, 81c. -: DIVISIONAL STAFF :- Division Editor Ens. R. E. Bly -: REPORTERS :- L. K. LaTour. FCle O. R. Selen. Cox. -: THE VICTIMS :- The Readers -: PRINTER :- T. B. Radalf, Seale J. H. Battle. Seale. tary and his aides aboard and feel proud of the honor conferred on us. We hope they find the HOUSTON as comfortable a ship as any they have sailed on and leave us, when the day for that comes, with a feeling that their two weeks aboard have been the finest is has been their fortune to experience. Assistant Secretary Roosevelt is aboard in connection with his tour of inspection of naval activities on the Pacific Coast. He has been away from Washington since May second and has visited Puget Sound, San Francisco and San Pedro- San Diego areas. Upon completion of his inspec­tion of Peral Harbor, he will return to San Pedro about May 30 and re­turn to Washington to make his re­port. Other members of the party, who are not aboard at the time of this writing, are Captain T. A. Syming­ton, USN, Mr. Arthur Meigs, Lt. Wm. A. Bernieder, USNR, and Lt. C. L. McAuliffe, USNR. They are ex­pected aboard before we sail. Of these Lt. Berneider is an old friend, Aide to the Mayor of Houston, he has been responsible for many fine things we experienced on our last visit to Hous­ton. To all we extend a heal'ty wel­come and wish you as enjoyable a cruise as it is in our power to make it. Weare delighted to have you a­board. --: 1: 0: 1:-- THE FIRE CONTROL DIVISION Commander Percy K. Robottom, USN, at present on duty at the Bur­eau of Ordnance, has been ordered to the Houston as relief for Commander F. D. Manock, USN, our present Executive Officer. Commander Ro­bottom will report about - 10 June at which time Comdr. Manock will go to duty at Bremerton, Wash. Commander Robottom is a gradu­ate of Naval Academy class of 1910, having been appointed from the state of Arkansas. He is a qualified sub­marine commander, and has seen much service in the undersea craft. He has also had duty as gunnery officer on one of the light cruisers, and served on the staff of Admiral Phillip An­drews, ( Ret.) while that officer was Commandant of the First Naval Dis­trict. Having read the glowing reports of several other divisions in previous is­sues of the Blue Bonnet, we rise to remark " You ain't seen nohow yet". From the foretop to the double bot­toms, and from the paravanes for­ward to the After Gyro, shine the bright lights of the famous F division To break down and be specific, we have the foremast, Central Station, Plotting Room, Magazines, Cata­pults, Hangar Deck, Airplane Crane and crane room, the after Stack, Bat­tle Two, AA Control, the Armory, the Gig and the Motorboat. Is that a full day's work? The F division is composed of fifty men and four officers. Of these, . three men and one officer are mar­ried, all of which may lead an obser­ver to the conclusion that we are a liberty loving gang- which isn't far from the truth. • A great many of the division are old timers, with a liberal sprinkling of plank owners. The newer men have fallen into the spirit of com­radeship and work which bodes well for their future. To make a long story short, gentlemen, we present those famous fighting men, the Fire Control Division. --*-*-- " Why does Geraldine let all the boys kiss her?" " She once slapped a guy who was Continued on page four chewing tobacco." Imitation of birds flight through air has been man's ambition since the day " thinking" became part of his mind. Theories and attempts fin­ally reached attainment December 17, 1903, when Orville Wright establish­ed the first sucessful flight record of twelve seconds. Progress in aviation since that day is known by all. The value of aircraft as a military weapon was recognized at its incep­tion. During the Civil War balloons were used as observation stations. The War Department appropriated $ 50,000 to see Professor Langley build a flying machine. In 1908 two naval officers investigated the . possibilities of aircraft at flights made by the Wright Brothers and recommended use of pontoons for naval purposes. In 1910 Captain W. I. Chambers, " father of naval aviation", after wit­nessing several air meets, persuaded the Curtiss Company to make a flight off a naval vessel. November 14, 1910, Mr. Eugene Ely successfully flew a landplane off a platform built over the bow of the USS Birmingham. Lt. T. G. Ellyson was sent to the Curtiss camp at North Island, San Diego in December 1910 and later became our first naval aviator. January 18, 1911, Mr. Ely made the first successful landing of a landplane on board the USS Pennsylvania while that ship was anchored at San Francisco. Next day he took off from the platform built on board and returned to the base on shore. January 26, 1911 Mr. Curtiss flew a hydroplane he had de­veloped together with Lt. Ellyson, landed alongside the USS Pennsyl­vania, was picked up, later hoisted over and took off to return to his b se. These feats of skill and courage ave a great impetus to naval avia­tion. As a result of these flights and re­commendations made by Captain Chambers, money was appropriated by Congress and the Navy started on its way to become aviation conscious. Capt. Chambers had obstacles and opposition from elders to overcome but his success is written in the his­tory of our aviation branch. During 1911 three more naval officers were qualified as pilots. In 1912 the first catapult was developed and success- * 17 May, 1935 *