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The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 4, No. 7, 1937-02-13
Page 4
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Mackenzie, C. J., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Hall, A. D., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 4, No. 7, 1937-02-13 - Page 4. February 13, 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 14, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1257/show/1256.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackenzie, C. J., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Hall, A. D., associate editor. (February 13, 1937). The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 4, No. 7, 1937-02-13 - Page 4. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1257/show/1256

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackenzie, C. J., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Hall, A. D., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 4, No. 7, 1937-02-13 - Page 4, February 13, 1937, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 14, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1257/show/1256.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 4, No. 7, 1937-02-13
Alternative Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. IV, No. VII, 1937-02-13
Creator (Local)
  • Mackenzie, C. J., editor
  • Ball, R. C., assistant editor
  • Hall, A. D., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Zeitfuss, W. G., distribution
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • San Diego, California
Date February 13, 1937
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 8
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name ussbb_201402_011_004.jpg
Transcript Page Four THE BLUE BONNET USS Houston—2-13-37—800. MARINE CREW RACE In a closely fought contest between ten-oared whaleboats for Marines, run off Friday, 5th February, the HOUSTON'S 5th Division huskys finished fifth. This, the second race of the afternoon was won by the Indianapolis' crew, being followed in the heavy mist by the San Francisco's boat as close second. Off to a good start and up with the others at the halfway mark, our oarsmen, with Chastain as coxswain, seemed to lack the final sprinting punch that the more experienced and longer-trained crews showed. It was a well-pulled race throughout and much credit is deserved by all these men who have spent many of their liberty and recreation hours preparing for the race. The bladesmen are as follows: (left to right) Slaughter, Howard, Keeton, Nelson, Jones, Chastain, (cox.), Lambert, Clement, Galaszewski, (stroke), Freiheit, and Smith. Nice going, men, and better luck next time! Trying is the important thing, everybody can't be first in any race! ABRAHAM LINCOLN (Continued From Page One) up from time to time under the pressure of necessity. "I was raised to farm work, which I continued till I was twenty-two. At twenty-one I came to Illinois, Macon County. Then I got to New Salem, now in Menard County, where I remained a year as sort of clerk in a store. Then came the Black Hawk War; and I was elected captain of volunteers, a success which gave me more pleasure than any I have had since. . . "I am in height, six feet four inches, nearly, lean in flesh, weighing on an average one hundred and eighty pounds; dark complexion, with coarse black hair and grey eyes. No other marks or brands recollected." "Yours truly, "A. Lincoln" WHAT THE SAILOR READS Put your "Bonnet" contributions in the For'd. Mess Hall box. According to a survey recently made on board the battleship West Virginia, the type of light reading matter that is preferred by the men of the crew depends largely on their length of service. The findings of this survey are so typical and reflects the reading tastes of so many men, not only on that ship but on all larger ships of the Navy, it is believed the subject will be of general interest. The survey report which was made on the WEE VEE is as follows: The new recruits from the training station are almost invariably seen reading wild western and exciting detective magazines. Seamen and Firemen, first class, and petty officers, third class, like such weeklies as Collier's, Liberty, and the Saturday Evening Post. Petty officers, second class, prefer something more solid, such as the Red Book, American, and Cosmopolitan, while petty officers, first class, and chief petty officers ask the ship's store for science magazines, Reader's Digest, and Esquire. The store ventures to advise the new recruits to avoid the "pulps" and take up the better type of magazines in order to increase the range of a better taste in reading matter and to expand the youthful vocabularies. All told, the ship's store offers for sale more than 40 different kinds of magazines and expresses willingness to stock others if the demand can be shown. At present the store carries a CHICAGO DAMAGE BLAME FIXED (Continued From Page One) of speed in the foggy weather prevailing at the time of the collision," and that, moreover, the engines of the defendant ship were not equipped to provide for a safe margin of power for going astern, this being due to the necessity of'first stopping the engines before putting them into the reverse position. The amount due the Government was arrived at from an examination of the acount records at the Navy Yard, Mare Island, where the ship proceeded for repairs after the accident. The United States brought suit against the Silver Line for $350,000, and the defendants countered with a suit for $150,000. The damages awarded the United States is the largest in modern federal court records in cases of collisions involving naval vessels. ■«.■■». 1— SERVICE PAY QUESTION (Continued from Page One) And the conclusion the editor reaches without bandying unnecessary words:— What the armed services need is someone to go to bat for them with no concern over the possible defeat of proposed pay legislation. How the Government or any of its legislators can consider the raising of federal employees' pay without including the armed services—so neglected in the past—is beyond understanding. variety from Two-Gun Pete to ultra- Hemingway.