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The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 4, No. 7, 1937-02-13
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Mackenzie, C. J., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Hall, A. D., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 4, No. 7, 1937-02-13 - Page 2. February 13, 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1257/show/1254.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackenzie, C. J., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Hall, A. D., associate editor. (February 13, 1937). The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 4, No. 7, 1937-02-13 - Page 2. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1257/show/1254

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackenzie, C. J., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Hall, A. D., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 4, No. 7, 1937-02-13 - Page 2, February 13, 1937, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1257/show/1254.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 4, No. 7, 1937-02-13
Alternative Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. IV, No. VII, 1937-02-13
Creator (Local)
  • Mackenzie, C. J., editor
  • Ball, R. C., assistant editor
  • Hall, A. D., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Zeitfuss, W. G., distribution
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • San Diego, California
Date February 13, 1937
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 8
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name ussbb_201402_011_002.jpg
Transcript Page Two THE BLUE BONNET —: THE BLUE BONNET :— A weekly publication, published by the ship's company of the U. S. S. HOUSTON, Captain G. E. Baker, U. S. N., Commanding and Commander P. K. Robottom, U. S. N., Executive Officer. EDITOR, Ensign C. J. Mackenzie Ass't, Editor:— R. C. Ball, Ch. Pay Clerk Associate Editor:— A. D. Hall, MMlc Distribution:— W. G. Zeitfuss, Bugle 13 FEBRUARY, 1937. • • • GETTYSBURG ADDRESS GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE OPENING Glib's WEEKLY LETTiDR (Continued from Page One) On 19 November, 1863, Abraham Lincoln, standing on the temporary platform, erected on the battlefield at Gettysburg, drew from his pocket a tiny scrap of paper, adjusted his spectacles, and in a few minutes delivered that which has become known as the "Gettysburg Address." Lincoln was not the orator of the day, but had come as was fitting the office he held, formally to dedicate the cemetery. Edward Everett a learned and profound orator had held the assembly under the spell of his eloquence for more than two hours. His was an argument in favor of the Union. The speech of Everett was widely publicized, while the remarks of Lincoln were hardly noticed, until the London Times framed them as a classic of the day. What Everett said was oratory; what Lincoln read was literature—a vision—a moment when prose became poetry. To read this address is to know the man Lincoln: "Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. "Now we are engaged in a great civil war testing whether that nation or any other nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate—we cannot hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have con- maneuvers in relation to the working out of fleet problem XVIII and is not expected to return to the California coast until the last week in May. Since one of the main features of the celebration of the bridge opening is a marine parade into San Francisco Bay, passing under the bridge, led by commander in chief of the fleet, it has been decided that the dedication will be deferred until the return of the fleet. It has been pointed out by some of the officials concerned that the presence of the fleet in the bay last November was the highlight of the celebration of the opening of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay bridge, and they have expressed readiness to sacrifice the advantage of an earlier opening of the Golden Gate bridge in order to have the fleet lead the parade into the harbor as the chief feature of a spectacle, the plans for which indicate a previously unknown outpouring of craft of every size and kind. Young Officer (with young girl in his arms): "Sir, I have just resuci- tated your daughter." Father: "Then, by gad Sir, you'll marry her! secrated it far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us, the living, rather, to be dedicated to the unfinished work which they who fought here thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom and that government of the people, by the people, and for the people, shall not perish from the earth." On the one hundred and twenty- eighth anniversary of his birth, we pay just tribute to Abraham Lincoln, the Great Emancipator, the common man who though great was ever humble, by rededicating our lives to the causes ennobled in his immortal Gettysburg Address. uear Sal, W hat's this here world a comin' to, c>ai? Got me one o' those trick eiecuiic shavers and am a scrapin' my cn,u real regular now a days. 'S funny tna things they think of. Next tning you'll know, they'll be inventin' a rapid tire pig shaver to shave off tha bristles durin' tha hot spell. It'll keep tnem from sweatin' away that good grain fed fat. With tha price o' hog meat these days a soarin' like an airplane a seekin' a new altitude record a body might be a savin' plenty that way. This time o' year the ducks and geese on tha farm will be a startin' to lay. Tell Pa he had better camp on tneir trails—for 'tis a sight to see— a sizzlin', roasted duck, stuffed to tna burstin' point and a waftin' temp- tin' odors to a hungry body. What do you know ? The other day one o' those black lookin' boats came around tha breakwater and then things started a happenin'. Signal bridge says there's an admiral a standin' this way. Officer o' tha deck says Okay, then starts a yellin'. Sound six beeps, call away tha guard and band on tha double quick, call tha admiral, call tha captain, call everybody says he. The black lookin' boat was a drawin' nigh. All hands were a scurrin' to and fro, a huntin' their places like tha cows do a trottin' in at milkin' time. Tha band was there, tha skipper was there, everybody was there—almost. Where was tha guard? Tha skipper, he starts a jumpin' up and down. Tha Officer o' tha deck, he starts a tremblin'. Tha black boat scrapes tha gangway. Where was those gyrines? Tha ad', decked out from stem to stern in Sunday go to meetin' uniform with plenty egg omelet doodads, and a wearin' a huge smile, just then heaves up tha ladder amid tha crash and glory o' honors. Methinks, 'twas a wondrous and a beauteous sight. All was serene and happy. But, says I to myself, what's that? Two white caps thrust up out from tha hatch, and then silently fade back in tha bowels o' tha ship. And then, I says to myself again, looks as if these here soldiers o' tha briny deep didna get tha word and were caught up tha creek without a paddle. Love, Gus