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The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 8, 1938-11-26
Page 2
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan, associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 8, 1938-11-26 - Page 2. November 26, 1938. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 14, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1195/show/1192.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan, associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. (November 26, 1938). The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 8, 1938-11-26 - Page 2. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1195/show/1192

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan, associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 8, 1938-11-26 - Page 2, November 26, 1938, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 14, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1195/show/1192.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 8, 1938-11-26
Alternative Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. I, No. 8, 1938-11-26
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
  • Sivak, Stefan, associate editor
  • Bannen, W. J., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Boris, John, circulation
  • Dillahunt, H. E., printer
  • Swiderski, S. J., printer
  • Schick, C. H., printer
  • Owen, D. W., printer
  • Rakowski, J. T., printer
  • Foltz, E. L., printer
  • Beckwith, R. L., printer
  • Surratt, R. W., printer
  • Hutchinson, B. E., printer
  • Elliott, J. E. Jr., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Long Beach, California
Date November 26, 1938
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 11
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name ussbb_201402_018_002.jpg
Transcript P»ge Two THE BLUE BONNET U.S.S. Houston—11-26-38—1200 —: THE BLUE BONNET :— A weekly publication of the ship's company of the U.S.S. Houston, Captain G. N. Barker, U.S.N., Commanding and Commander C. A. Bailey, U.S.N., Executive Officer. Editor: Lieut, (jg) E. A. McDonald. Assistant Editor: Ensign J.P.M. Johnston Associate Editor: Stefan Sivak, Jr.. SKlc Associate Editor: W. J. Bannen, Bkr 3c Cartoonist: W. C. Ridge Circulation: John Boris, Y3c Printers: H. E. Dillahunt, CPrtr., S. J. Swi- derski, Prtrlc, C. H. Schick, Prtrlc, D. W. Owen, Prtr2c. J. T. Rakowski, Prtr3c, E. L. Foltz, Prtr3c, R. L. Beckwith, Sealc, R. W. Surratt, Sealc, B. E. Hutchison, Sealc, J. E. Elliott, Jr., Sea2c. "THE UNKNOWN SOLDIER" France originated the idea of honoring an unknown soldier as a symbol of all those who lost their lives in defense of their country. On Sept. 9, 1921 in compliance wth a joint resolution of Congress, the Secretary of War instructed the Quartermaster General of the Army to pick from the unidentified American dead the body of a member of the American Expeditionary Forces to typify the Americans who lost their lives in the World War. The selection was to be made as to preclude the remotest possibility of future identification as to his name, rank, organization, service or the battlefield on which he fell. Four unidentified American bodies were exhumed from four different cemeteries, from the cemeteris at Meuse-Argonne, St. Mihiel, Somme, and Aisne Marne. Every precaution was taken to make certain that these bodies were those of members of the A.E.F., who had been killed in battle. The cause of death was apparent from gun shot wounds on the body and the uniform, equipment and original burial place determined that the person belonged to the A.E.F., but there was absolutely no evidence nor clues as to identity. These four bodies, after being embalmed and put in similar caskets, were placed in a small improvised chapel in the city hall at Chalons-sur-Marne, France. On Oct. 24, 1921, Sergeant Edward Younger of the United States Army was chosen from the American sol- THE INEVITABLE CHAIR (Continued from page 1) a farewell cigarette and smile when they face a firing squad; the Chinese face their executioners with a stoical calm. I tried to appear brave too, but couldn't hold back little shivers which chased each other down my spine. Chaos was ahead. I watched them as they made the chair ready. Everything was being made ready with scientific precision. Coldly efficient, bright metal gleamed from the reflected rays of the central light. There wasn't a chance of anything going wrong once you were fitted into the chair. I settled myself. They adjusted the head rest. The time had come at last. The eyes of the white garbed figure searched me minutely, and I knew that their owner would make it as painless as possible. There was a few seconds pause before Doctor Schlack straightened up from his inspection and pronounced these words, "Yes, its a dead tooth all right, and it'll have to come out." JUDGE NOT There is so much good in the worst of us, And so much bad in the best of us, That it hardly behooves any of us, To talk about the rest of us. So, Don't be what you isn't; Just be what you is; For if you is what you isn't, Then you isn't what you is. diers present, went into the chapel alone and designated one of the four bodies as the unknown American Hero, by placing a small spray of white roses upon the casket. The body was then immediately placed in a specially prepared casket and conveyed to the United States on the U.S.S. Olympia. After lying in State in the Capitol at Washington, D. C, the Unknown Soldier was interred in front of the Memorial Amphitheater in Arlington National Cemetery on Armistice Day, 1921, with solemn ceremonies. NAVAL HISTORY "We Have Met The Enemy And They Are Ours." In order to stop the British military operations in the upper Mississippi Valley, it was planned to cut off their communication with eastern Canada by obtaining command of the Great Lakes. To do this, Master-Commandant Oliver H. Perry collected a fleet of nine vessels on Lake Erie, having built five of these vessels from green timber, and Captain Barclay built a similar fleet of six British vessels. On September 10, 1813, the home-made fleets met at the western end of the lake. On his flagship, the LAWRENCE, Perry hoisted a blue flag bearing the dying words of Captain Lawrence, "Don't give up the ship!" The LAWRENCE and two Kmall ships hauled ahead of the remaining United States ships and became engaged by the entire British squadron. The LAWRENCE was soon a wreck: and Perry having fired the last effective gun with his own hands, rowed in an open boat to the NIAGRA with his 13 year old brother and a few survivors. Then he brought the other ships into action and soon won the engagement. He returned to the LAWRENCE to receive the swords of the surrendering British captains. He reported the victory on the back of an old letter, saying, "We have met the enemy and they are ours ■— two ships, two brigs, one schooner, and one sloop." The victory regained the Michigan-Detroit territory for the United States and had a marked effect on the peace negotiations. Perry's original flag bearing the words, "Don't give up the ship" has been carefully preserved and is on display in Memorial Hall at the U.S. Naval Academy where it serves as an inspiration for the Nation's future naval officers. McPherson and family sat down to Thanksgiving dinner. "Now children," he said,"do you want the cold meat or a nickel apiece?" Three hands shot up for the nickel. The meat was removed and Mrs. McPherson then served apple pie. "Now, Children," said McPherson, "Who wents a piece of pie for a nickel?"