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The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 7, No. 4, 1938-07-26
Page 4
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan, associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 7, No. 4, 1938-07-26 - Page 4. July 26, 1938. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 18, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1185/show/1184.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan, associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. (July 26, 1938). The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 7, No. 4, 1938-07-26 - Page 4. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1185/show/1184

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan, associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 7, No. 4, 1938-07-26 - Page 4, July 26, 1938, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 18, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1185/show/1184.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 7, No. 4, 1938-07-26
Alternative Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. VII, No. 4, 1938-07-26
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
  • Sivak, Stefan, associate editor
  • Bannen, W. J., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Partridge, A. M., circulation
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy
Place of Creation (Local)
  • Off Galapagos Islands
Date July 26, 1938
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 11
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name ussbb_201402_017_004.jpg
Transcript Page 4. THE BLUE BONNET U.S.S. Houston 7-26-38—900 "THE GALAPAGOS ISLANDS" by Waldo L. Schmitt (From Page 3.) coast of South America from the Antartic regions and turns westward off northern Peru to swing through the islands. Probably the most remarkable feature of the islands and the one which drew visits from the whaling vessels is the abundance of tortoises on the islands. By making use of definite and specific records of tortoises taken as compiled by Dr. C. H. Townsend, Director of the New York Aquarium, it was observed that 13,013 tortoises were taken by seventy nine American vessels between the years 1831 and and 1868. At one time there were more than seven hundred vessels in the American Whaling fleet alone. There can be no questioning of the fact that the catch of the few ships whose records he was able to check represented but "a mere fraction of the numbers of tortoises actually carried away". GOOD SHOT Roast suckling pig formed part of the President's meal the other night. The trusty rifle of Lt.-Comdr. Kelley brought two wild porkers to their early finish when he unloosed two shots in their direction while ashore at Clipperton Island. The larger boar being too heavy to bring back to the ship was left on the island to serve as a silent warning to the rest of the pig population there. REVENGE "When I was a little child", the sergeant sweetly addressed his men at the end of an exhaustive hour of drill, "I had a set of wooden soldiers. There was a poor little boy in the neighborhood and after I had been to Sunday School one day listening to a stirring talk on the beauties of charity, I was soft enough to give them to him. Then I wanted them back and cried, but my mother said: "Don't cry, Bertie, some day you'll get your wooden soldiers back". "And believe me, you lopsided, mutton-headed, goofus-brained set of certified rolling pins, that day has come". NEPTUNE'S WELCOME (From Page 1.) went up to flutter at the fore. On the second gun the Jolly Roger went up to the starboard main yardarm. Amid the call of the bugle, piping as he passed through a rank of 8 officer-polly- wog sideboys, the ruffles and flourishes, the tune of "The Old Gray Mare", the "present-arms" from the marine guard of the day, the King was received with the pomp and glory befitting to his most royal and most regal personage. He was welcomed aboard by the Captain. There was a humorous glint in the King's eye as he surveyed the lubberly crew of pollywogs. He rubbed his hands together and called for his torturers. Then the fun started. The "works" was given to the souls who had never before visited his realm. The gauntlet, the stocks, the coffin, the blessing, the charge—royal baby's milk, pills, operating table, electric chair, barber chair, water tank- Neptune's instruments of torture. When it was all over the pollywogs were accepted as fitting subjects of King Neptune—Long may he rule. MULLET'S AWAY He adjusted his reel And tuned up his gear And sat himself down On his well known rear Pa caught fish On the end of a rod. In spite of the visor And called unto God. "A swordfish" my hearties, Pa gave him the line He sweated and fretted "This baby is mine". Pa patted his stomach And laughed with elation, "Five hundred pounds Without dehydration". The fish gave a last gasp, Pa swallowed his gullet He looked at his prize, He'd captured a mullet. THE STORY OF THE BARONESS AND HER LOVERS (From Page 3.) The baroness at once proclaimed herself ruler of the Galapagos. "The mad empress of the Islands and her court, living their tropic idyl of love in beautiful retirement", Was the way the press put it. The two men fought each other to gain the amours of the Baroness. She egged them on. The fights finally ended with Phillip- son the victor. Lorenz, beaten and bruised by both the larger man and the Baroness, was forced to wait on them like a serf. But the discord did not end riere. The self styled ruler, clad in brassiere and silk shorts with a pistol swung from her doughty hips, drove away all newcomers. She shot at some, threatened others, and tolerated with some show of hospitality only the large parties which were stronger than her own. Finally, it all came to a tragic, inevitable end. The Wittmers rushed over one day to find only Lorenz, distracted and wild-eyed. He explained that the Baroness and Phillip- son had just left "on an American Yacht." Nearly eight months later (1934), the Santa Amaro, a Tuna Clipper out of San Diego, hove-to off March- ena. The skipper and part of the crew went ashore to investigate some rags which fluttered from atop a pole. They found an overturned boat, two corpses of men, and a half consumed iguana. Marchena, 160 miles north of Charles Island, has no fresh water. Lorenz and Nuggerud, Norwegian owner of the wrecked boat, had perished in a vain attempt to attract a passing ship. To this day nothing has been heard of or has anyone seen either the Baroness or Phillipson. Whether Lorenz slew both in their sleep, disposed of the bodies, then fled to a final reckoning is a matter of conjecture. Only the sun, moon, stars of these tragic islands, and destiny know the answer. So far, Proimos, traitor of the shellbacks, holds the honors of catching the biggest fish. A 120 lb. sea bass fell victim to his hook. REMEMBER: A grapefruit is only a lemon that saw a chance and took it.