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The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 7, No. 4, 1938-07-26
Page 3
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan, associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 7, No. 4, 1938-07-26 - Page 3. July 26, 1938. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 14, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1185/show/1183.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan, associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. (July 26, 1938). The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 7, No. 4, 1938-07-26 - Page 3. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1185/show/1183

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan, associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 7, No. 4, 1938-07-26 - Page 3, July 26, 1938, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 14, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1185/show/1183.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 7, No. 4, 1938-07-26
Alternative Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. VII, No. 4, 1938-07-26
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
  • Sivak, Stefan, associate editor
  • Bannen, W. J., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Partridge, A. M., circulation
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy
Place of Creation (Local)
  • Off Galapagos Islands
Date July 26, 1938
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 11
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name ussbb_201402_017_003.jpg
Transcript THE BLUE BONNET Page 3. The Galapagos Islands By WALDO L. SCHMITT The Galapagos Islands might well have been called Nature's laboratory of experimental evolution; a visual demonstration of the facts and the principles of evolution. They are, to this day, a living epitome of the ORIGIN OF SPECIES. I have made three visits to the islands and on them have traveled trails unchanged since the early days of man's sojourn there. Among those trails is one up to the Salt Crater Lake on James Island. Salt workers have come and gone over this trail. Their shelters lay fallen and forgotten over others that were constructed at even earlier periods. THE STORY OF THE BARONESS AND HER LOVERS Here is a story written by every newspaper in the land, yet there was never a tale with less facts, more misinformation and conflicting theories. The setting lies on a small Galapagos Island known as Floreana, Charles, or Santa Maria (the second is the most commonly used). With its spotty patches of fertility it is anything but an Utopia or Eden. In fact a grim struggle to eke out a bare living in even the choicest portions is the lot of the settler there. Before the advent of the three major characters, who were to tear the normal tranquil life asunder with hate, passion, and greed, two families and a Norwegian lived on the island. Urholt, the Norwegian, the 1st permanent inhabitant, was joined by a Dr. Friederick Ritter and a companion, Frau Dore Koerwin. The latter couple fled from Germany after leaving their more civilization loving spouses. Shortly afterward a second couple, the Wittmers, came to live on the Island. To blast this rather doubtful harmonic life into shreds, and to focus the eyes of the world on this little portion of volcanic matter the three characters made their sweeping entrance. Baroness Eloise Bosquet de Wagner Wehrborn of Vienna and Paris conceived the idea, in company with her lover, Alfred Rudolph Lorenz, of establishing a summer resort on the island and having it a regular calling place for Grace Line ships. Together with Robert Phillipson they arrived on the island, (Continued on Page 4.) Upon the crest of the crater wall stand an old rusty engine for operating an abandoned cable-way, idle and dilapidated. Goats, descendants of the original flock that escaped Admiral Porter's men back in 1813, still are plentiful. Tagus Cove, indenting the western shore of northern Albemarle, has changed little in the last hundred years, except for the disappearance of the tortoises from the vicinity. The precipitious rock walls of this breached crater-harbor today carry no end of large painted calling cards of yachts from all parts of the world, and of tuna fisherman and various expeditions from the states. At anchor far back in the most sheltered place in the cove at the time of my last visit was the small yawl of the circumnavigator, Robinson, who was saved from an untimely end by an emergency appendicitis operation by U. S. Navy doctors who flew over from Panama on a wireless hurry call. There is no mistaking the wholly volcanic nature of the Galapagos. On every hand are craters of primary, secondary, and lesser degree, fuma- roles, cones, and vents, a graphic example of vulcanism to the nth degree. The valley of Ten Thousand Smokes would suffer, I believe, by comparison. Indeed much of the Galapagos scenery and especially that about Christopher Point, the most westerly projection of southern Albemarle, prompts one instinctively to exclaim, "The Valley of the Moon!" No more typi cally lunar landscape is to be seen anywhere else on earth. On Albemarle, steam jets are not uncommon sights, and on adjacent Narborough as well. Various expeditions have reported volcanic activity, including brilliant eruptions, on a number of the islands. Chatham supports a larger popula-' tion than any other of the islands. Between two and three hundred persons cultivate its extensive, fertile plantations, work in the sugar mill when this is in operation, and engage in cattle raising for export to the mainland. Many years ago Charles Island supported about as large a population as exists on Chatham today. These people were described, at that time as "nearly all people of color who had been banished for political crimes". They lived in an agricultural community consisting of some fifty of more crude little homes distributed about as many little chacras, or farms. Traces of the original settlement and a later attempt of colonization remain - occasional bits of stone wall or foundation, wild cattle and pigs, burros, dogs and cats, even chickens, a few plants that may have escaped cultivation, and a host of orange and lemon trees. These trees, though running wild, are still flourishing in great profusion, so that in season the fruit falls to the ground for want of hands to pick it. Magnificent trees bear as delicious oranges as any you ever tasted. These trees must well be a hundred years old or more, some have boles a foot thick. When the ripe fruit falls, the wild pigs and the wild cattle swarm to the feast, so that the place is no longer safe for man. The wild boars and the powerful, fierce, Black Spanish bulls are not to be trifled with. The climate of the Galapagos has been described as ideal. Despite the fact that the archipelago lies directly under the Equator, the average temperature is quite low, ranging between 70 and 80 degrees. This uniformly low and even temperature is due to the Humbolt current, a cold stream that sweeps up along the (Continued on Page 4.)