Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 7, No. 4, 1938-07-26
Page 2
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan, associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 7, No. 4, 1938-07-26 - Page 2. July 26, 1938. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 18, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1185/show/1182.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan, associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. (July 26, 1938). The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 7, No. 4, 1938-07-26 - Page 2. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1185/show/1182

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan, associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 7, No. 4, 1938-07-26 - Page 2, July 26, 1938, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 18, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1185/show/1182.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 7, No. 4, 1938-07-26
Alternative Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. VII, No. 4, 1938-07-26
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
  • Sivak, Stefan, associate editor
  • Bannen, W. J., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Partridge, A. M., circulation
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy
Place of Creation (Local)
  • Off Galapagos Islands
Date July 26, 1938
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 11
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name ussbb_201402_017_002.jpg
Transcript Page 2. THE BKUE BONNET —: THE BLUE BONNET :— A weekly publication of the ship's company of the U. S. S. Houston, Captain G. N. Barker, U.S.N., Commanding and Commander C. A. Bailey, U.S.N., Executive Officer. Editor Lieut, (jg) E. A. McDonald Assistant Editor: Ensign J.P.M. Johnston Associate Editor: Stefan Sivak, Jr., SKlc Associate Editor: W. J. Bannen, Sea. lc Cartoonist: W. C. Ridge Circulation: A. M. Partridge, Flc FISHING FACTS ABOUT GALAPAGOS ISLANDS Watch standing, gun drills, and divisional work have scarce left us a breathing spell. The time passes quickly this way—perhaps even too quickly for us to assimilate all the new things we hear and see concerning the stops made. The other evening, Dr. Schmitt gave an excellent talk on the Galapagos Islands illustrated by lantern slides. It was too bad there was a high wind at the time which took some of the words right out of the loud speakers and blew them once or twice around the stack before finally coming to our ears. For those who were unfortunate enough not to be present then, and for those having difficulty in hearing the lecture we are running highlights of the Galapagos (Extracts from one of Dr. Schmitt's articles) in this issue™also a plain, unvarnished tale of the Baroness and her two lovers. The Galapagos, under the jurisdiction of the Government of Ecuador are the most interesting bits of land on the face of the globe today. To know them thoroughly provides you with a topic of engaging interest which should make anyone sit up and take notice. Shortly we shall visit Cocos Island. The tales of buried bucaneer's treasure and loot have made people search there by the scores. It is a very good thing to seek out all the facts. To know your lands visited well is to broaden your character to a corresponding degree. For those who intend dropping a line in the waters of these parts the following may be of great interest to you when upon pulling in your line you may find an unusual fish. It may be any of these we are about to describe. The most prevalent (and tiresome) fish is the common "Grouper" a brownish basslike beggar of from two to twelve pounds in weight. For the sportsman they provide little sport, but for the table, few dishes are better. The "Golden Grouper" is less common by far, and rather more difficult to catch. Groupers have a trick of doubling back upon the line and severing it just above the leader. The "Skipjack" is a common catch, and, per pound of weight, is as gamy as any, fighting until pulled into the boat. The largest Skipjack in these waters appear to be about twenty- five inches, weighing not more than six pounds. With its deep blue back and rainbow shades blending into silver stripes, few fishes of the mack- eral family could be called more beautiful. The "Cosmopolitan Dolphin" - not the Porpoise, but the fish of the High Seas, is one of the rare catches among the Islands, and is prone to measure only three of four feet in length. The coloration is vivid and extraordinary, being shot with electric blues and yelow capable of rapid change. The "Dolphin" is a welcome catch in the Galapagos, not only for the sport, but for the table. Equally prized for the table is the "Cerro", a game little chap, somewhat resembling the "Spanish Mack- eral", but with yellow spots on the sides, weighing up to eight pounds. The "Tuna" is another fighter in these waters, but one must be fast to bring in the whole Tuna due to the Shark menace. The "Wahoo", Barracuda-like in form, here reaches a length of about five feet or more. Barracuda-like again, the nose is sharp, but the teeth comparatively small. When hooked DIVINE SERVICE DIVINE SERVICE All hands are cordially invited to attend on Sunday. The ship's orchestra will furnish splendid music as usual. The Chaplain will discuss problems of importance to everyday living. "I was glad when they said to me Let us go unto the House of the Lord." the Wahoo is generally off with many yards of the line before the angler has had time to gather his wits, and the fight is continuous thence onward to the gaff. The "Rooster fish", with his buffalo hump and highstanding rooster- feathers, though apparently less common in the Galapagos than either the Tuna or Wahoo, is surely no less of a fighter per pound of weight. He is more difficult to land, darting swiftly toward the angler, then suddenly away, he is often able to free himself, and always able to provoke some excitement. Streamlined like the Dolphin, heavy by the head and long tapering, he may be expected to weigh about fifty to seventy-five pounds. No game fishes of the Galapagos are more capable of putting up a lasting battle. From the standpoint of pleasure, the Galapagos angler may expect more of it from Tuna, Rooster-Fish, and Wahoo than from any other game of these waters. Last but not least, is the many types of Sharks which may be seen and caught. The Ground Sharks are the greatest in numbers. One fishes for nothing in particular in the Galapagos, and tackle should be selected accordingly. - Card of Thanks - The message of condolence and accompanying token at the time of the death of my brother, Nor- bert Kallaus, are deeply appreciated. Heartfelt thanks to my shipmates. Joe Kallaus, S2c