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The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 4, No. 2, 1941-02-01
Page 3
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Adams, T. C., editor; Rentz, G. S., advisor; Gallagher, F. E., sports editor; Albers, C. D., circulation. The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 4, No. 2, 1941-02-01 - Page 3. February 1, 1941. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1150/show/1148.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Adams, T. C., editor; Rentz, G. S., advisor; Gallagher, F. E., sports editor; Albers, C. D., circulation. (February 1, 1941). The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 4, No. 2, 1941-02-01 - Page 3. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1150/show/1148

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Adams, T. C., editor; Rentz, G. S., advisor; Gallagher, F. E., sports editor; Albers, C. D., circulation, The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 4, No. 2, 1941-02-01 - Page 3, February 1, 1941, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1150/show/1148.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 4, No. 2, 1941-02-01
Creator (Local)
  • Adams, T. C., editor
  • Rentz, G. S., advisor
  • Gallagher, F. E., sports editor
  • Albers, C. D., circulation
Contributor (Local)
  • Moon, T. H., printer in charge
  • McGowan, J. W., printer
  • Irey, J. E., printer
  • Skokowski, J. F., printer
  • Vieira, J., Jr., editor
  • Elliot, E., Jr., printer
  • Denson, J. E., printer
  • Fink, N. H., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (Local)
  • Asiatic Station
Date February 1, 1941
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 9
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
Item Description
Title Page 3
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
File Name _0751_R.pdf
Transcript THE BLUE BONNET OLONGAPO DRY DOCK < Continued from Page 1) again; it having been adrift again when the BRUTUS' lines carried away, during which time we drifted 100 miles back over our course to­ward the United States." Added to these worries was the fear that their water and coal would not last until they reached Port Said. The real threat to the expedition came when word was flashed from the dock itself that her plates were open­ing up due to the rivets rapidly be­coming loosened. Rather than run the risk of the DEWEY being lost in mid ocean the commander changed course and put in at Las Palma, Canary Islands, for repairs and supplies. On April 7 in the eastern Mediter­ranean, about 20 miles offshore from Malta, a gale was encountered which not only brought the worst weather of the trip, but again setting the dock adrift. For two days they rode out the storm keeping the dock from beaching by every vessel putting a line over to her and towing under full power seaward. They didn't move a mile, but it kept the dock safe. Transit of the Suez Canal was ef­fected with little trouble. After Sing­apore was reached, there was but 1300 miles to go to Olongapo. Subic Bay was sighted in the early morning of July 10, 1906, and soon the DEWEY was safely anchored. A few hours later the towing ships stood out for the return trip home, with hearts glad to be on their way back to home which they hadn't seen in over half a year - and with no dock to tow. American men- of- war have not been the only customers for the DE­WEY. Of the more than 1900 ships docked in her basin, many have been commercial ships of American regis­try and also of nearly every other nation except Japan. No trace of Japanese ships having been docked were in the Journal. There were Ger­man ships even in 1918; French, Dutch, English, and cruisel's from several different navies have been docked in this great servant of our Asiatic Fleet. Once the dock sank when, on May 23, 1910, it was flooded to a coaling barge level to make the coaling pro­cess easier; workmen did not raise it that night, since two destroyers \ vere to be docked the next day and it would have to be lowered again. When they returned the next morn­ing, the DEWEY was on the bottom SOME SHORT AUTO TRIPS RECOMME DED For those who would like to see more of the scenic attractions of the Philippines, renting a taxi is perhaps the most desirable mode of trans­portation. Roads are good, and taxis may be engaged at surprisingly low prices, especially when a carful of people go together. We are passing on the following information for those who may be interested. Make sure meter of car work. Yellow taxis are O. K., as well as others. Larger cars marked 15c & 5c carry 4 men. 15c is for first 9/ 16 mile; 5c for each 3/ 8 mile additional. The cost of a trip to Cavite, one way, from Manila Hotel to Navy Yard gate is P3.00, about 22 miles. Smaller cars marked 10c & 5c carry 3 men. 10c is for first lh mile; 5c for each additional lh mile. Cost to Cavite, one way about P2.30. Larger cars charge 75c an hour for waiting; smaller cars a little less. The meter registers waiting time. Return trip at double cost of one way. If car returns empty, add $. 50 charge, from Cavite - you can re­turn by - ferry fl'ee. To GUADALUPE RUI S, PATE­ROS (" Ducktown," home of baluts), and FT. McKINLEY- about 20 miles round trip. Out Calle Herran to Route 109A, thence to Guadalupe Ruins, and on to Pateros. This trip gives one a fine opportunity to observe the native life of the islands. To MONTABAN GORGE and BAT CAVES. 20 miles one way, bats fly at dusk. Route 82. To TAGAYTAY CITY A D RIDGE. 38 miles one way to Tagay­tay City. Persons making this trip should especially note the forests and plantations along the way. of the bay. Salvage operations began immediately, but it was not until June 29 that it was raised. Since that time very strict supervision has been exercised over its operation and definite areas of responsibility e ta­blished together with marine sentries posted to keep guard over the dock. Some years ago the DEWEY was converted into an oil burner. She has more than paid for her cost to the government. - Hawktalk. Page Three ~~ h " WHO'S ~ WHOOEY" Lt. ( jg) J. D. Lamade has recently been promoted to a full Lieutenant. After graduating from the U. S. Na­val Academy in 1932, Lt. Lamade served for two years as an Ensign on the Maryland. He then went to Pensacola for flight instructions, leaving in 1935 to go to squadron VS- 4 on the Langley, then operating as an aircraft carrier. Mr. Lamade has served on four of our aircraft carriers, the Langley, Saratoga, Lex­ington, and the Ranger. He then went Asiatic, and was transferred from the Augusta to the Houston upon arrival on the Asiatic Station. Congratulations LIEUTENANT La­made. Brown, BM 2c, coxswain of the pulling whaleboat, almost had a mu­tiny on his hands when he took the whaleboat crew out that time at Mariveles. It was just a little past sunset, and the beach looked more and more inviting in the red glow of sunset, with its cool white sand, tall cocoanut trees and all. " Let's go ashore," they began saying, and they pulled a little harder. " Stop!" he cried, but to no avail. Just then the boat went aground in the shallow water, but still a long ways from shore. Brown heaved a sigh of relief, for their attention was diverted to getting the boat back into deep water, and the incident was over. Callison, MAA, man. ag'er of the boxing team, enjoyed the show at the Santa Ana Turf Club where sev­eral of the Houston boxers were per­ticipating in a smoker. Rumor has it that he liked the gala 15- act floor show so much that he had to borrow some money from one of the judges to take the red- headed hula dancer home afterwards. ( Ed.- Oh, for the life of a boxer!) ••• WILD ANIMALS YOU SHOULD K OW THE LIO is called the King of Beasts because that is the main thing about him. He has tactile facial vi­brissae or whiskers provided with large nerve- bulbs about the size of peas. If you examine these closels for several moments your time hasn't come yet. The Lion is a generous foe because he kills with one blow of < Continued on P" ge 4)