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The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 3, No. 13, 1940-11-13
Page 2
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Weiler, F. B., editor; Mallory, F. F., assistant editor; Molitor, C. M., assistant editor. The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 3, No. 13, 1940-11-13 - Page 2. November 13, 1940. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 14, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1145/show/1142.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Weiler, F. B., editor; Mallory, F. F., assistant editor; Molitor, C. M., assistant editor. (November 13, 1940). The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 3, No. 13, 1940-11-13 - Page 2. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1145/show/1142

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Weiler, F. B., editor; Mallory, F. F., assistant editor; Molitor, C. M., assistant editor, The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 3, No. 13, 1940-11-13 - Page 2, November 13, 1940, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 14, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1145/show/1142.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 3, No. 13, 1940-11-13
Creator (Local)
  • Weiler, F. B., editor
  • Mallory, F. F., assistant editor
  • Molitor, C. M., assistant editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Albers, C. D., circulation
  • Irey, J. E., printer
  • Denson, J. E., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (Local)
  • Enroute Manila, Philippines
Date November 13, 1940
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 6
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
Item Description
Title Page 2
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
File Name _0741_L.pdf
Transcript Page Two Published every two weeks by the ship's company of the USS HOUSTON, Captain J. B. Oldendorf, USN, Commanding, and Com­mander H. L. Grosskopf, USN, Executive Olfleer. Editor: Ens. F. B. Weiler Assistant Editor: Ens. F. F. Mallory Ens. C. M. Molitor Circulation: C. D. Albers, Sea Ie. Printers: J. E. Irey, Prlr. Be. J. E. Denson, Sea2c NAVAL COUR'.::' ESY The emphasis placed on the effi­ciency and vigor of Navy life some­times causes us to picture Navy men as a rough as well as a ready lot. Nothing could be farther from the truth. Today, the customs and traditions of Naval life have formed the strict­est code of conduct and courtesy known to moderns. These rules · of conduct, courtesy, and consideration are not restricted to the officers but are equally required of the enlisted men of the modern Navy. As a group, the personnel of our Navy, officers and men, are so indoc­trinated with their code of morals and conduct that they are probably more conscious of the rights of others, and evidence more considera­tion for those rights, than do any other group or class of men in the world today. From his first day of enlistment, the Navy man finds himself forced to discard all old principles of selfish motives. The rules of conduct for group living require much higher standards and strength of character in the individual than is found nec­essary in uncoordinated civil life. Navy men, by virtue of their oath of all'lgiance, are dedicated to the service of our country; but every man in the naval service is proud of his duties in a broader sense. He feels deeply his fellowship with every other member, be he seaman " 1' admiral, pride in the vast ramifi­cations of all the Navy's accomplish­ments and the ideals of its personnel. Exchange. It's HARD SOMETIMES To apologize To begin over To take advice To admit an error To face a sneer To be charitable To be a good loser To endure success To avoid mistakes To keep on trying To obey your conscience To be a good winner To keep out of a rut To forgive and forget To profit by mistakes To think and then act To help the other fellow To maintain a high standard To dispute underhandedness To shoulder deserved blame To make the best of a little To subdue an unruly temper To admit one's religious beliefs To recognize the silver lining To accept a rebuke gracefully To smile in the face of adversity To value character above reputation To discriminate between sham and the real But it always pays. .... " Iswas" MILITARY STRATEGY An Irish soldier in France during the 1915- 18 war received a letter from his wife saying that there wasn't an able- bodied man left, and she was going to dig the garden herself. Pat wrote at the beginning of his next letter: " Bridget, for Heaven's sake don't dig the garden; that's where the guns are." The letter was duly censored and in a short time a lorry- load of men in khaki arrived and proceeded to dig the garden end to end. Bridget wrote to Pat in desperation saying that she didn't know what to do, as the soldiers had dug the garden up, every bit of it. Pat's reply was short and to the point: " Put in the spuds." The best way to cure a cough is to give the patient two spoonfuls of cas­tor oil. After that, he'. ll. be afraid to cough. , .. Out of the Way Inscription on a monument in France marking the grave of army mule: In memory of Maggie, who in her time kicked two colonels, four majors, ten captains, 24 lieutenants, 42 serge­ants, 432 other ranks and one Mills bomb. THE BLUE BONNET TRUE STORIES It's a thing of lasting wonder How these birds with bulldog maps Can cut in with all the cuties And cut out the handsome' chaps, And it isn't simple fishcakes, Nor the dough the bulldogs waste, It's just there's no accounting For a modern woman's taste. They sat alone in the moonlight, And she soothed his troubled brow, " Dearest, I know my life's been fast, But I'm on my last lap now." ~ ' 1. THERE'S A STEAMBOAT ON THE RIVER A great wealth of literature and lore has sifted back to the fleet from the China Sation- some of it unden' ­able, some dubious, all colorful. It is a sin to tell a Tsingtao tale or a Yangtze- Kiang yarn exactly as you heard it; it should carry with it some of your own ingenuity- but here i~ one that came to us, and we pass it on unembellished. A certain Officer ( whose name we withhold, but who then and there ac­quired the nickname of " Tug- boat Tommie") was in command of a rath­er battered amI antiquated river aux­iliary. The First Lieutenant could keep her afloat, but the Chief Engin­eer could hal dly make it worth his while. " Tug- boat" was trying to coax his teakettle up the Yangtze against a heavy current, and progress was slow indeed. Upon approaching a bend, at one- half mile distance, he complied with Inland Rules of the Chinese River Authority Dy sounding a prolonged blast on the steam whistle. The blast faltered, yea even fizzled, toward the end, and the tug slipped swiftly and unhappily down the stream whence she came-- her paltry supply of steam completely exhausted. Thirty minutes later she tried again. Unruffled and unheraldea by a whistle, she puffed illegitimately, but successfully, ' round the bend.