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The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 4, 1939-02-21
Page 3
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor. The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 4, 1939-02-21 - Page 3. February 21, 1939. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 20, 2022. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1000/show/998.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor. (February 21, 1939). The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 4, 1939-02-21 - Page 3. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1000/show/998

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor, The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 4, 1939-02-21 - Page 3, February 21, 1939, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 20, 2022, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1000/show/998.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. 1, No. 4, 1939-02-21
Alternative Title The Blue Bonnet, Vol. I, No. 4, 1939-02-21
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Pipp, M. A., circulation manager
  • Beckwith, R. L., printer
  • Essy, E., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (Local)
  • At Sea
Date February 21, 1939
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 3
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
Item Description
Title Page 3
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
File Name _0653_R.pdf
Transcript THE BLUE BONNET. a weekly publication of the ship's company of the U. S. S. Houston, Captain G. N. Barker, U. S. " Commanding and Commander C. A. Bailey, U. S. N., Executive Officer. Editor. Lieut. ( jg) E. A. McDonald; Assistant Editor, Ensign J. P. M. Johnston; Cartoonist, W. C. Ridge; Circulation Manager, M. A. Pipp, Yeo3c; Printers, R. L. Beckwith Seale, E, Essy. Sea2c. Dry Tortugas And Doctor Mudd Forty five miles due west to where men's bodies and souls stag­nated then rotted to resemble the slime kicked up on stone walls by the sea fed moat. Forty five miles to a living hell where escape was impos­sible save that offered by the razor edged teeth of sharks. Forty five miles to as grim a reminder of cruel confinement as will ever sully the pages of American history. That was the exact distance from the Houston's anchorage in Key West, Florida to the mouldy walls of the former Federal prison which leaped into prominence before the American public recently when " Shark Island", the motion picture, was released. On the last minute bit of land on the map which forms one of the Florida Keys one sees the name ' Dry Tortugas'. Any coastal steamer go­ing around the Keys to or from the Gulf of Mexico passes within sight of Fort Jefferson on this island. As they do a few of the passengers and crew no doubt think back upon the tor­ment and anquish undergone there or suffer a twinge of remorse in knowing the unfairness of justice in the case which scarcely has a parallel in all legal history, the trial and in­carceration of Doctor William Mudd. The trial is singular in that it involved a man unwittingly entang­led, yet quite indirectly so, in one of the greatest tragedies that ever befell the American people, the assassina­tion of President Abraham Lincoln. Allyone amiliar with Amel: rcan history knows that John Wilkes Boothe broke a leg in jumping to the stage at the Forde Theater after he fired the fatal shot into the President. His subsequent escape to find a doc­tor in order to set the leg, and the happenings which actually transpired afterward are mOl'e or less as varied and confusing as there are relaters of facts of this period. However, as a re­sult Doctor Mudd was arraigned and found guilty of high treason. He in­nocently had set the leg of a fellow human being. His crime was that he had helped the wrong human, as­sassinator Boothe. Therefore Doctor Mudd was sentenced to Fort Jeffer­( Continued on Page 4.) THE BLUE BO NET Band Entertains Daily During the noon hour and be­fore the movies the mellow tones of our new band delight the ears of us all. They either swing it to the most modern versions of catchy tunes or entertain in the sedate proper clas­sical fashion. This musical organiza­tion has no set method of presenta­tion. Every man being able to play at least two instruments, makes it versatile to the nth degree. Twenty men under the leader­ship of J. D. Carey, Mus. lc came aboard in Portsmouth and rapidly " quartered down" for the duration of the President's cruise with our ve ­sel. Sea duty, however, is not new to them as they recently went to South America aboard the Phoenix on the vessel's shakedown cruise. We are glad to have them with us at the present time. They'll be missed when they leave. This band is a student band which is composed of men who are required to enlist for a period of 6 years; 2 years of instruction and 4 years of active service. The new meth­od of assembling Naval bands wa originated by Lt. Charles Benter who now is in charge of the music school in Washington, D. C. His aim was to better Navy music by founding a school comparable with the best in the country. Results speak for them­selves. Two Men One leaned across a battered, heaving rail And straine< l. his eyes.- grown wise with sea travail, Beyond horizons, breathing rose and musk, And dreamed of gardens lost in scented dusk. !, he other paused at noon beside his plow, To rest a bit, and cool his sun- burned brow, The while he counted clouds, like little ships- And wiped the thought of spindrift from his lips. Page 3 She's A Feeder "\ Vhen a man does his work well, commend him at once." In the continuous hustle and bustle of Navy life the above is the exception rather than the rule. Very often I've dreamed ( but not on watch) of a position that ' would make it possible for me to pend my time observing men at work and when the occasion warranted it, voicing the " Well done." In general, no blame is attached to officer or en­listed personnel in authority for fail­ure to commend men at work because absorption in their duties prevents them from being in a position to do o. Those of us, however, who have the time and are so disposed, can help out by expressing our senti­ments. This cruise originally struck me as an " extra duty" job. The only con­solation I had was received from the statement of a great number of ex­Houston crew - " she's a FEEDER". Throughout the Navy the topic " chow" is second in importance ­need I mention the primary one? Food, its preparation, quality and quantity are discussed from dawn till dusk and individuals and ships they serve get panned or glorified as the ca e may be. Here on the Houston, I've found that she is a feeder and something else too. Some one in that galley force expresses his personality in pre­paring the food to such an extent that upon getting up from the table you unconsciously look around for your host so that you can thank him for your plea urable feeling. Nut only is the main course O. K. but the des­sert fits in like a glove - the cooks have good company in their bakers. I could go on like this for hour and hours but I wouldn't want any­one to think I'm a gourmand. This opinion I have of your commissary force is shared not ony by most of the temporary duty personnel on here but I find the crew thinks that way too. Well Done, Commi sary Depart­ment. Keep up the name of the good 01' U. S. S. Houston.