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Montrose Voice, No. 263, November 8, 1985
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Montrose Voice, No. 263, November 8, 1985 - File 001. 1985-11-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 9, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/971/show/946.

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(1985-11-08). Montrose Voice, No. 263, November 8, 1985 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/971/show/946

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 263, November 8, 1985 - File 001, 1985-11-08, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 9, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/971/show/946.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 263, November 8, 1985
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date November 8, 1985
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Montrose Led City in Percent for Whitmire By Henry McClurg Montrose Voice Publisher! Editor Although the Straight Slate made it into one runoff and contributed to another, Kathy Whitmire's victpry over Louie Welch cnn be attributed more to those bed partners of Welch than to any other factor. Misjudging their influence and misjudg· ing the general population's acceptance of a hate and fear campaign, Welch trans· formed a 50·~5 lead in the polls in May to a 41'69 election defeat Tuesday. Welch on Halloween eve complained that the mayoral election had become a one-issue race on AIDS and the gay com· munity. Nevertheless, it was Welch who keep poundmg on the issue in his inter­views, speeches and commercials. Speaking before the Rotary Club of Houston Oct 31, Welch said, "I'm con· Cl'med because too many issues have been omitted from the coverage the campaign 1s gettmg. Too much attention ·has heen given only to a single .. issue." Then he went on to talk about that issue. The next day, after being shown a new KTRH poll that showed the gap between him and Whitmire had widened, Welch dropped a controversial TV ad on the sub· JC<'! The commercial attempted to tie the Whitmire administration to the spread of AIDS in Houston, saying the city has the third largest number of cases of any in the country. Dr. James Haughton, director of the City Health Department, says Houston is actually fifth in ranking There have been 370 cases reported in the Houston. metro­politan area as of early 0C"tober, with 213 reported deaths. Welch media advisor Bob Heller said the continued p.3 o All Decked Out Ahove, for Wh1tm1re on election night. On the right, for Welch on Halloween eve. Montrose Voice -~~-- ----- - --- - - - "The Newspaper of Montrose" November 8, 1985 Issue 263 Published Every Friday (713) 529-8490 Fighting AIDS Fatalism-What Teen Prostitutes Don't Want to Know Could Kill Them By I..aura Fraser and Stan West Pacific NPu•s Service Special to the Montrose Voice Teenage prostitutes, who often use drugs and have intercourse with people of both sexe.s, turn a high risk of being exposed to AlllS, researchers say. Hut prevt-nting ttJe deadly disease among teen hustlers is thwarted by another malady common to their group­a careless fatalism, born of harsh street life. In the Unitl'd States so far the Centers for Disease Control have counted 68 cases of teens with Ams. That figure is rela­tively low when compared to other, oldn agp groups. But experts thmk many more teens, especially runaways using drugs, may have died from the disease before they could be counted. And IK.>eause the incubation period for the immune systcm·attacking di~eas~ is between two and five years, most carriers are no longer teenagers by the time symp· toms surfaC'c making counting difficult. Some A!OS researchers speculate that if teen prostitutes are using drugs and not eating and resting properly, the incuba· tion period could accelerate. Grave warnings have little effect, though, on those street youths who .say they don't care much if they live or die. "Everything is a risk in this world. I risk dying everyday out here on the streets. Do you think a little rubber is going to save my life?" says al 7·year-old hustler named Stevie when asked if condoms passed out hy hf'alth workers make adifferencein his doily life "I've heard some teenage gays say they don't give a damn if they get AIDS," says John Culvey, n 16-ycar-old "snlesman" ' R7• ... ITE Teenagers of the stri•et .• ,uch as those seen on Westhe1mer, often engal(e in prostitution as a means of sur11iL•al. They arl' at hi11h risk for eatching AIDS. However, many of the youths fl'el the need to surv11•e out11Jcighs the risk. who works the Powell Street BART train station entrance in San Francisco. He is part of a duster of street youths who dress in New Wave clothing, nicknnmed by some as tht• "Powell Street Punks." Culvry, who is not a prostitute but lives in 11 youth shelter where many spend the night, says, "I know some teen hustlers who range from 13 to 17 who have told me to my face that if they get AIDS, they're g01ng to give it to everybody they know." Culvey snys he hns been on city streets since April when he left his Oregon home after being "beat to a pulp by my step-father." He admits to using intravenous drugs, but says the AIDS scare has finally forced some changes in his life. "I usro to share my needle and shoot up acid, speed, cocaine and anything else I could get my hands on. Then I saw a T\' special on AIDS that said people who share points (needles) can get the disease. I've been clean for two weeks." Bill, 23, is less concerned. He is a prostl· tute who lam.basts "snfe sex"­intercourse without passing bodily fluids-as "garbage," declaring, "I already know I'm going to die." After working the stre<>ts for eight years Bill's experience tells' him, "I bet you eight out qf every 10 kids has a point on them right now" "I don't care one way or another whether I get AIDS," says Tim, a young male prostitute. "I have to survive-you know, eat, sleep and get high. Plus, I don't think I'll get it. !fl haven'tgotten it now, I won't get it tomorrow." Michael ;o.;uJte, executive director of the Gay Youth Switchboard in San Francisco, says most of the street youths he talks to daily are confused about AIDS and have few sour· ~ of information. Like Tim, '"They're worried about day-to-day ,survival-food and shelter-and don't think about the long term risks." He and other community workers are trying to change that with counseling and education programs. They have had some successes. At the Larkin Street Youth Cen· t.er in San Francisco, which offers medical and counseling sen.ices to 'treet kids, a 16-year-old prostitute named Nikki says he now realizes "San Francisco is like a death trap. I've got to worry about what I do. I wear condoms." r:ontinued p. 6 2 MONTROSE VOICE I NOVEMBER 8, 1985 Good reading for you =================~from========= A•L•Y•S•O•N PUBLICATIONS DEADLY LIES, by John Preston, SS.DO. Who says heroes can't be i:ay? Ever •mce his lover w11s killed by a homophobic coward, Alex Kane has fought for the safety of gay men everywhere Here, he takes on an un•crupulous pohuc1an m· tent on spread1ni: homophobic propa· ganda. (The fust two books m this sencs are also available, at SS.DO each: Sweet Dreams and Golden Years.I YOUNG, GAY AND PROUD!, $4.00. Gay teenagers have no place to go with theu questions. Thi• candidly-written book addresses such concerns as. Am I really gayl What should I tell my parents! Is 1t a good idea to come out in schooJI How can I tell 1f my best fncnd 1s gayi BET\\ EEN FRIEXDS, by G1lhan E Hanscombe, $7 00 In this mnovat1vc and w1dely-pra1scd novel, Hanscombe uses the hves of four very different women to explore 1ust how strongly our pohucal be11efs shape our everyday hvcs SOCRATES, PLATO AND GUYS LIKE ME: Confessions of a gay ~choolteacher, by Enc Rofes, S7.00. When he graduated from Harvard, Enc RQfes began teaching sixth grade at a conservative pnvatc school Soon he felt the stram of a split identity - between "the gay Eric and the teacher Enc," here he tells oi two years of teaching from w1thin the closet, and bis difficult decision to come out at work. DANCER DAWKJNS AND THE CALIFORNIA KID, by Willyce Kim, S6.00 A new and very different lesbian novel, which Judy Grahn calls· "A wonderful, np-roaring Western lesbian adventwe that left me warm, tickled, and hoping she wntes a dozen more." "The book of the year," writes Fem1ms1 Bookstore News ............. "''...,, nn.., tf ltlt' "f .. H I \I I \ 111111 EXTRA CREDIT, by Jeff Black, $6.00 Harper King has a boring teaching rob, ~1agnant relat1onsh1ps, and a tank full of fish named after ex-lovers dying in the same order their namesakes were se­duced Can you blame him for wanting a fresh startl This story of hb hfe and ioves is the funniest gay novel of the year IN THE TENT, by David Recs, $6.00. Tim seventeen has no way of express· mg his atuact1on to bis schoolmate Aaron, so he is left with frustration, hum1hauon and guilt But m the middle of a campmg mp, a ~torm traps the two of them m a tent wuh two other boys, and the issues can no lunger be avmded. Paced with a hfe-thrcatenmg situauon, the boys must rely on each other. THE SPARTAN, by Don l;larrison, $5 95 In the days of the first Olympics, gay relationships were a common and valued part of life The Spartan tells the story of a young athlete and his adven· tures m love and war, providing a vivid picture of classtcal Greece, the early Olympics, and an important part of our history. THE LA VEND ER COUCH: A con­sumer.' guide to psychotherapy for leb· bians and gay men, by Dr. Mamy Hall, $8.00. How many of us really know how to choose a therapist, or how to get the most out of therapy? Here, in a refresh· ingly readable style, Hall addresses that cntical que:mon, as well as what to ex· pcct from therapy, danger signs to watch for, and when to get out of therapy. HOT LIVING: Erotic stories about safe •ex, edited by John Preston, $8.00. The AJDS crisis has closed off some forms of sexual activity for health-conscious gay men, but it has also encouraged many men to look for new fortns of sexual ex· pression. Herc, over a dozen of today's most popular gay writer• present new short stories that imagmauvely eroticize safe sex. Contributors include Toby Johnson, Frank Mosca, Marty Rubin, Sam Steward, George Whitmore and T R. Witomski. SECOND CHANCES, by Florine de Veer, $7 .00. Is 1t always harder to accept what 1s offcrc<l freely? Jeremy, young and still naive about the gay world, could easily have the love of his devoted friend Roy, yet he chooses to pursue the hand­some and unpredictable Mark. THE HUSTLER J O HN H E NR Y MA C KAY l•AN ATlO IY HU l [lt Kl.N NEDY THE HUSTLER, by John Henry Mackay, trans. by Hubert Kennedy, $8.00. Gun ther is fifteen when he amvcs alone in the Berhn of the 1920s. There he soon learns bow to pick up a few extra dollars on the street One of bis customers 1s a sensmve and naive young man who becomes hopelessly enamored wuh Gunther But love docs not fit neatly in· to Gunther's new life as a hustler . .. The Hustler was first published in 1926, m Germany Por today's reader, it combines a poignant love story with a colorful portrayal of the gay subculture that thrived m Berlin a half-century ago. FIRESTORM, by Gerald Wening, $6.00. Most gay fiction rakes place in an urban setting; here 1s an exception Fuestorm tells of two men who fall in love in a rural midwestern town, only to have religious homophobia dramatically alter their lives, CHOICES, by Nancy Toder, $7.00. A popular novel about lesbian love that depicts the joy, passmn, conflicts and in· tensity of love between women. MEDITERRANEO, by Tony Patrioh, SB.00. Through •omc 46 photos, Italian photographer Tony Patrioli explores the homo-erotic territory in which, since the beginning of time, adolescent boys have discovered sex. (Oversize paperback) by Samuel M- Steward owthor of rht Phil Andros uonts MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER, by Samuel M Steward, $7 .00. This unusual mystery sends Gertrude Stein and Alice B Toklas s leuthing through the French countryside, attempting to solve the mysterious disappearance of a man who is theu neighbor and the father of their handsome deaf-mute gardener. A new and very dlfferent treat from the author of the Phil Andros stories = ·············:ro·oiiiii:-a-············ ~ Enclosed is$ __ Please send the books I've listed below (Add SI.DO postage when ordering just one book; if you order more than one we'IJ pay postage.) Please send me these books: 1. __ 2. _____ _ 3._ 4. ----­s. __ ------- Visa and mtJStercord accepted, please send acct number, exp. date. and signature. name ---------- address - ----- -- city _ -- state --~ zip ____ -- ALYSON PUBLICATIONS Dept. P-5 40 Plympton St. Boston, MA 02118 : ........................................ : ~I WEI.Cao\~ 10 "THE Ol)Rr, ~mE··~\\~ ~E ~\tleN\ Wf46 'IE.Fi l~~W™'JOJR~RCATQ.5· Montrose Voice ANO TEXAS•' TAR MONTROSE. TEXAS Population ("t 1985) 32,000 Census tracts 401 01. 401 02. 402.01, 402 02. •«i 02 403 •nd 404 01 Montrose Led City in Percent for Whitmire Zip coon (roug hly) 10006, 77019 f port1on), noge Bounded (roughly} Shepherd Or (wetl l. Allen Park*•Y (nor1h), M11n St (east). US 59 (south) Latitude {MontroH 91vd al WMlhe!ttnef Rd) 29• 44·13··N Longitude 9~• 22·50~w. Alltlude 40· ELECTED OFFICIALS FOA "'ONTROSE George GrNnt1•. Houston City Councd (dist C) El Frianco LM(J(Jt.::l.bt·::~I~ ~!?.!oner (pc;t I) 100' Pruton. (1'3J 121·5111 Wllltr Rankin. Conalablt (pct 1) 301 San JIClfllO. (1 13) 221·5200 Oeora Oanburg. Tex11 Houae a' Repr ... n1ahvet fd11t 137) rer rs w ' *r. t113J sneoes Craig Waatungton. Tt•e Senate !<Jill 13) 2323 C.tObtt• . (713} esg., 343 ~ICkpY Leland. US House Ci Aepeseni.trva (dfat 18) UH9 Sln'th •m (1f3J 139-733f The Newspaper of Montrose Established 1980 OUR 263rd ISSUE, NOV. 8. 1985 Published every Friday Montrose Voice Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006-3028 Phone (713) 529-8400 C IR C ULATION 9.000 cop1n wffkly through 150 major distribvtt0n poinll 1n Montrow , the Village and the H•tghts fft1matMI ,,.".on rtt• factor 2 8 9$timattd re•d•r1h1p 25.200 weakly plus l .000 cop191 weekly through 45 other Texas d1Slnbut1on points e111mttMI pna-on rtt• factor 2.S ttrimtt.cl reMJtr1hip 2.500 vrHldy TOTAL CIRCULATION !GUARANTEEOI tO OCX> copies weekly total tstimat~ 1Hdtr~hlp 27 700 vrHkly Contents copyright C1985 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg publish•t·«litor Linda Wyche managing «11t0f Roger Lackey office manager Mark Biazek-Aut fin corrupond«'I Scott CutSlngor, Boll O'Rourke 1oc:o1contrl0Utors Steve Warren natlQIUlf co,,Hpondenl Jerry Mulholland eccount • •KIJP1v• R1c:k Hdl .-ccounr ••ecut fo.;e Foun<1iflQ Mtml»rJ Greater M'>ntrose BuaJness Guild OIV' Ind LNb•tn Press Anoc1at1on Ntws Serv;ces Newt-On•. P1c1hc News Service Syndic.area FHture S•rv1CtJ & Wtit•ra Brien McNaught. Unt­verul PrKI Syndtcttl News .America S yru:hcate POS,.MASTER Send eddreas correc11ona to 408 Avondale Houston TX 1700&3028 Sut>Jtt1pt10n ,.,. 1/1 US In H•led .,,velape $.(9 per yur (-';2 kl!uesJ S29per 11J1 month• (28 •HuesJ Or I ~per week (less than ~ ltuol) Sack i11ueJ $2 00 each N•tlOl'f•I .OV9ffiJ ng ,.pt..sent•I~• Joe O S.b.110 R"·enda • Market no 666 8th Avenue New YOf'k 100l1 212) 241- 6863 Advetlta no Wtd nt TuesdlY 5 JOpm tor Huer9)eued fr :,;:~:1~1,1,Hfl LOCll ldvert S ng rate IChedule S.....en.A ,.., effective Oct 12 198' R"poNllHI t~ The Montrose voice dOet not assume re'PCln-­sibtl ty tor 1dve1111 ng c111ms Readers ahOuld llert the "-'NI paper lo 1ny aecept1ve 9(fvef11S no from pagr I decision to pull the ad was because Welch wanted to "close out the campaign with something other than that." Welch and Steve Hotze and his Straight Slate thought the issue of job protection for homosexuals back in January would be the noose for Whitmire and some city council members in November. It was, instead, the rope that hung Welch. In the weekend prior to the election, both candidates seemed to be toning down their statements and curbing their appearan· ces. They seemed to be accepting the inev· itable. Whitmire appeared confident of victory. Welch appeared trying to distance him Relf from some of his earlier rhetoric­including his infamous "Shoot the Que· ers" live TV blooper. A poll of 500 registered voters conducted for the Houston Post and KPRC-TV and released Oct. 31 showed the blooper-by itself-was to have only a minor effect on the outcome. The blooper mostly jusi ral· lied people who were already firmly in the camp of one candidate or the other, as 72% of those polled could cite the blooper verba· tim and another 10% had the general idea. Out of those people, and among those that had previous ly considered them­selves undecided, 21% said they were less likely to vote for Welch and 10% said t~ey were more likely to vote for Welch iust b<>cause of the gaffe. If you assume 15% of the voters were undecided at the time, as polls showed, that would translate only into about 1 ~% of tht> voters-significant in a close elec­tion but not significant considering Tues· days margin of victory for Whitmire. In Montrose precincts, Whitmire took 86.0 percent of the vote (compared to her · 58.9 percent citywide) and Welch squeezed out only 13.4% of the Montrose vote (com­pared to 40.6% citywide). Whitmire's per· ct>ntage of the Montrose vote was her highN•t of 21 neighborhoods where indi· vidual sta tistics wern initially computed. Montrose also gave Anthony Hall his highest percentage (69.8%) of a ny of the neigh horhoods m the race for City Council at Large Position 4. (Opponent Dick Hite received 20.8%and Straight Slater O.J . Streigler got 5.6%. Hall will face Hite in a runoff election . Their citywide percentages were 45 and • 32, respectively.) Only one Straight Slate candidate, Jim Kennedy, managed to make it into a runoff. He will face incumbent Judson Robinson Jr. for City Council at Large Position 5. Robinson received 49.8% of the citywide vote and Kennedy got 29.6%. Kennt'dy manages a youth baseball league that in past years has competed with the Montrose Softball League for the use of Levy Field in the Greenway Plaza area. He has based his campaign so far on that issue. saying homosexuals should not be using the field. He has sent letters to the Parks and Recreation Department over the past five years complaining about the Montro~e league and including allege· tions that MSL players engaged in sexual acts. Likewise, MSL officials have said that Kennedy has not been cooperative in try· ing to work out arrangements where both leagues could effectively use the field. At least once Kennedy was said to have "hosed down" the field just prior to its use by the MSL, making it muddy. Kennedy got thehighestshowingofany Straight Slate candidate. In the next Montrose Voice, we will explore the history of Jim Kennedy and his fight with the MSL. STEVE 0 . MARTINEZ, M.D. INTERNAL MEDICINE INFECTIOUS DISEASES SEXUALLY TRANSMIITED DISEASES AIDS!KS DIAGNOSIS OPEN MON.-FRI 8:30AM·5 PM SAME DAY APPOIN1MENT MON .. WED .• FRI. EVENINGS AND SATIJRDAV MORNINGS BY APPOINTMENT ONL V 2801 ELLA BL VD., SUITE G HOUSTON, TX noos (713) 868-4535 -~ 808 Lovett 521-1015 Weekday Specials POT LUCK Lunch or Dinners (Tea or Coffee included) only $399 NOW; with all Egg Orders-Hash Browns or Gnts included DON'T GO PSYCHO Relax ... ENJOY A MOVIE 1401 CALIFORNIA 527-0656 7i I '"" f""\QT • i I q .. ,QP.A'"l 't ~ 4 MONTROSE VOICE I NOVEMBER 8, 1985 Photos by Roger Lackey Montrose Soap The People Have Spoken By L'Angelo Misterioso, Esq., M.8.E. What an exciting week It has been. What with the election and all the attention 11 gen­erated The 611 Club1 sure was the center of attraction, as the so-called Straight Slate (or hate slate. 1f you prefer) descended tn the pouring rain to stir up more of their evil brand of bigotry and ignorance The 611 made ti all the way tnto the big leagues as far as the news media was concerned. It was featured all across the USA The 611 again grabbed al! the honors on • election night as ti was the host for "GPC Election Central." Anyone who was tn the v1cm1ty and didn't have a great time. well, too bad. too sad The news media was out m full force with Channel 11 being the most prominent m their coverage A grand salute to all who were there, espe­cially the members of the GPC, the efficient and warm staff of The 611. and to you. the constituents, who voted and made 11 possi­ble for 11 to be a victory party - and not a funeral for our freedom and way of hie -o- Now on to the regular front· when is Liberty B•nk going to fix their clock/temp sign? It's been broken for far too long now. It's even still on daylight savings time. or am J only just dreaming all this? -a- Congrats go out to one 5,, David Wills of Union J•ck. He has recently been sanufied to the most high pos1t1on of manager of operations for the store Full salute to your reign tn that most coveted spot And besides. he"s a nice guy Union Jack 1s currently having a sale on 501 Levis. They also have an addition to the staff, Martin Goode. He"s a real cutey So stop on m Get off that fanny and get s11opp1ng, Merry Cnmpble 1s only 47 days away -o- Ruggle1 Seafood has finally reopened m its revamped state The food 1s just wonderful So, all you fish eaters descend upon Rug­gles and feast your little lips away. -o- Many welcomes and all that to Mil<e Hall who 1ust reJurned from Florida, for a short tenure of four months Hope you decided to extend your stay. -a- Montrose School of Hair Design has finally opened its doors across from the R8dlo Shllck parking lot Enroll now• And speaking of that area you may have noticed the golden arches going up. It won't belong Would you rollerskate with this one? Don · forget the upcoming rodeo. It's sure to be something to file 1n the "Don't Miss" category For information. contact the TGRA -o- What's all this I see about "Cash in your crabs?" Anyone want to give it a try? I would except I don't have any crabs Oh well, some people are priv1ledged, aren't they? For further information call 590-CRAB You might well ask. are they serious? -o- November 8-10 see's the production of ··oh Mr. Faulkner. Do You Write. ·· a play being presented at the Lanier Middle School. For ticket information. call 526-1709. - o- Start making your plans now for the upcom­ing 1985 Prime Co1ce contest, to be held at the Ripcord on Nov. 27 at 9pm sharp. This 1s a contest for men over 40. It will be quite an event Emcee chores will be shared by the ever-popular Maude. Mr Ben Moore, and Mr. Rick Howard Also on the bill of fare 1s the appearance of the 1985 Mr. Leather International, Patrick Toner. If he isn't enough to get you out, then there must be no hope for you But seriously folks, be sure to attend. It's guaranteed to be a great time for all. Also. compliments go to the Ripcord on its music. Love that good old rock and roll. -o- The former home of Manon and Lynn's will be overhauled and retuned tnto a new club tentatively called Cousins. More on that as it comes m. Be sure and go have a great time at the new Marlon end Lynn's over on Rich­mond Wow what a nice place -o- All you fans of the baked potato, take heed Fridays are $1 .00 off on al potatoes at the Spud-U·Llke. Now you've got no excuse not to treat yourself to one See ya there on Friday1 -o- Dlrty Sally'• has gone Vegas style Now on Wednesday's you can belly up to the black­jack table and have fun with a professional dealer. It's all for fun and 1t starts at 6. -o- Talkvllle has recently added new security gates to the garages and parking lot Just one of the thmgs that wonderful Mr. Arthur Talk has done to make his tenants' quahty of hie a flttle better Mr Talk or Uncle Arthur as he is sometimes affectionately known among his tenants, really cares about his people and will treat you no differently He OUR .. A PL tf r U A f l The topless look. Welcome back Don Richards (r). We sure mined you. Dai,id Wills, new manager of Union Jack surr was busy election day. Preparing Election Central for the big night. has a few vacancies available nght now. So If you~re looking for a safe. clean place to hve, you should give him a call It really is a nice kept neighborhood. - o- A warm Texas welcome goes out to all the players m this weekend's Hou-Tex V Tennis Tournament. Good luck to all you netters -o- Caught sight of a former Houstonian, "Mike Bisson, romping through during the Hallo­ween testiv11les at Heaven. Mike now resides in Auston and can be found at the West End Pub, along with former Housto· man Ted Sikorski. Can't wait to see y'all next time -o ~ All you skaters will be happy to hear that there will be a "Roll to Glory·· skate rally held at Sam Houston Park, on Sunday, Nov 10 Registration begins at9am There will be trophies awarded to the top ttiree finishers as well as the youngest and oldest flnsher. This skate rally benefits Crime Stoppers. See you there bright and early Sunday morning Oh yea, you can get info and advanced registration forms at the Skate Escape, or by calling 520-5553 -o- You may have noticed at the top of the page that we've changed the name of this column We're now known as Soap, the column where it all comes clean-the column that cleans out all the dirt. - o- Well, now that all the primary hoopla and excitement is over. remeber we stlll have the runoffs for Anthony Hall and Judson Robin­son Jr After that. we can really get on with all the Important tasks at hand. and con­tinue to make Montrose and Houston a much desired piece to be Do your part. we're all in this together Talk to ya later. Stein & Toklas DETECTIVES Join Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas as they sleuth through the French countryside, investigating the disappearance of the father of their handsome gardener. A new and unusual novel by Samuel M. Steward, author of the Phil Andros stories, and a real­life friend of Stein and Tok.las. MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER $6. 95 in bookstores, or use this coupon to order by mail. Here is $7.so for Murde--;: is Murd;; is Murd;r, by S~uel Stew;-d. city state p ------- Alyson Publications, Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 We don't care if you paint your hair blue, rip the steeves off your shirt or pierce your ear. But don t smoke iust to be like your friends Or to be different from your friends. Or to be anything at all. Because with everything we know about cigarettes today. there's only one thing you'll be ti you start smoking now And that's sorry Sorry you can·t get up 1n the morning without coughing your lungs out. Sorry you can't cltmb a single fltght of stairs without getting wind· ed Sorry that every time you ltght one up. your risk of heart disease goes up If you·re already a smoker, take some time to stop and think ti all the way through . Right now. it's your decision In the long run . it's your life WE'RE FIGHTING Fa< 'TQJRUFE t. American Heart &~ Association V NOVEMBER 8, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 5 l4~ . (713) 524-8884 CJtJmith'S OPTICIAn/ Collectors of the Largest Variety of Elegant Frames in Houston. Plus Service: • PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED •LENSES DUPLICATED 4313 AUSTIN AT WHEELER (East of Sears) • FRAMES REPAIRED •CONTACT LENSES Mon. - Sat. 7:30 am - 6:30 pm • PERSONAUZEO TINTING $100 OFF FIRST MONTH RENT 1 BEDROOM SPECIAL Rents from $199 • Spacious Floor Plans • Sparkling Pools • Unique Picnic Area • Near Greenspolnt Mall • Beautiful Landscaping • W/D Connections MOVE-IN TODAY AND RECEIVE A TRIP TO HAWAII 16250 IMPERIAL VALLEY DR. 448-6738 .._-----------, : s10°0 : ! off l I CUP THIS AD and attach it to I I your next order for S 10.00 off I any of the following items: • Letterheads • Postcards • Brochures • Multipart Forms • 2-Color Printing • F~ers • Contracts • Menus • Resumes • Envelopes •Announcements • Invitations • Business Cards • Dcxx Hangers • Report or Booklet Copying • Invoices SPEEDY - ::-- ~INTIN. 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Change & Lube • Shocks & Mufflers • ElectOCal Wmg • Carburetor Repar • Cal Joe Sanchez 861 -9772 1 001 Rlllland Houston. Texas 77008 6 MONTROSE VOICE I NOVEMBER 8, 1985 Houston to Host Second Texas Gay Rodeo The Second Annual Texas Gay Rodeo will be held next weekend, November 14-17, at the Houston Farm and Ranch Club in Bear Creek Park. The Rodeo will get underway after a con­te11t to determine Miss Texas Gay Rodeo at the Brazos River Bottom on Thursday evening. On Friday evening, at the Ranch Club, there will be a barn dance welcoming home Dena Kaye from Nashville, where she is representing Texas in the Wrangler Country Showdown. Friday evening's fes­tivities will include performances by country-western dance groups from acrosi; the country and the announcement of the winners in the Mr., Ms .. and Miss Texas Gay Rodeo 198.5 contests. Rodeo performances will begin at noon on Saturday and Sunday and will feature trick riding appearances by Vern NicholR of Phoenix. Dancing to Dena Kay and presentation of the rodeo awards will fol· low Sunday's rodeo performance. Rodeo tickes are available in advance in Houston at The Barn, Bacchus, The Bra· zos River Bottom, Kindred Spirits, The Ranch, The Ripcord and TWT. During the rodeo, they can be purchai;ed at these loca· tions, at the arena grounds, and at the host hotel, the Manor House Motor Inn We t, I 10 at Highway 6. The arena at the Houston Farm and Ranch Club is a covered, all-weather facil­ity, so that, come rain or shine. a good time awaits rodeo attPndees. Food, beer and soft drinks will be sold during all perfor­macnes Prostitutes and AIDS from page I Other outreach workers distribute con­doms and packets of AIDS information to prostitutes on the street. But John Loren· zini, himRelf a victim of the disease, fears the present efforts are too little, too late. Loren7ini, 38, io coordinator for the San Francisco AIDS Foundation, a research and information center similar to Houi;­ton "s KS/ AIDS Foundation. He suggestR that unless teen hustlers are reached more effectively, they could be a major conduit of AIDS into the heterosexual community. Many eventually leave the street life for a more mainstream exii;tence, and con­tinue to have sex with partners of both sexes, he says. "These high risk hustlers could be a threat to the entire teenage com· munity if they carry the AIDS virus. A sexually active kid with AIDS is a walking time bomb." Lorenzini says he knew one of three Bay Area teens who died last year from AIDS. "This 19-year-old went skateboard to deathbed without the opportunity to learn anything about life," he recalls. "Jliow he's gone becauRe he didn't know any better" Volunteers Needed for Study The Dermatology Department at Baylor Collt'ge of Medicine is beginning a scien· tific clinical study to evaluate a new, effec· tive, and safe topical medication for the treatment of infestation with pubic lice (crabs). The medication, Permethrin I% lotion, is a synthetic chemical closely related to natural insecticides found in planta such ai; chrysantheums. Patienta who volunteer for the Baylor etudy will receive free evaluation, treat­ment, and follow-up examinations as well as $50 compensation for their time. For further information, potential patienta may contact investigators at 590- CRAB~ Want to be 1022 Westheimer 528-8851 immortalized in Mary's new balfop? If SO, bring I 1n your photos to Mary's (of course!) ..~ ~Pl~y ~Safe! Member Lary Thompson, D.J. THE BEST LI'n'LE GUEST HOUSE IN TOWN REASONABLE NIGHTLY & WEEKLY RATES PRrYAfE BATHS FREE PARKING FOR RESERVATIONS CALL (504) 566-1177 1118 llRSULINES STREET, NEW ORLEANS , IA 70116 Whitmire Names Panel for Health Card Study Mayor Kathy Whitmire, on Wednesday, appointed four members of City Council to a panel to determine if there is a need for reinstituting the city's health card policy. Councilman Dale Gorczynski will chair the committee on communicable and infectious disease control. He will be joined by councilmembers John Goodner, Eleanor Tinsley and Jim Greenwood. Dr. James Haughton, city health director, will serve as an advisor to the group. City Council has delayed a vote on the health card issue until Dec. 3 pending the panel's report which will be based on expert te>;timony gathered via hearings. The call for renewal of the health card system came from The Campaign for Houston, the anti-gay group in the Janu­ary referendum, as a means of controlling the spread of AIDS. The Campaign for Houston, backers of the Straight Slate in the current election, has begun a petition drive seeking a referendum on that issue. Recycle a Stake People with leftover yard signs should not discard them but tum them in at the Inter· national Flag Company, 2700 Stanford. The stakes from the signs will be used for signs being made for City Councilmen Anthony Hall and Judson Robinson in their runoff contesta, they said. Hall will face Dick Hite in the runoffs. Robinson is pitted against Jim Kennedy of the Straight Slate. Human Rights Law Protects AIDS Victims The director of the Texas Commission on Human Rights said Tuesday that a 1983 law protecting handicapped workers from employment bias applies to people with AIDS. William Hale, director of the state com mission which works with the federal Equal Employment Opporunity Commis­sion, said that the law bans employment discrimination against persons with per­manent physical or mental handicaps. He added that AIDS victims would be included because the disease is physical and permanent. The law prohibits discrimination against persons whose handicap does not prevent them from performing their job duties. Hale believes AIDS5 victims, espe­cially in the early stages of the disease, can satisfactorily perform most jobs. Under the law, AIDS victims denied employment would file a complaint with the commission. An investigation would be used to determine whether the employer knew the applicant had AIDS and if that was a factor in refusing to hire the com· plain ant. Although the agency has yet to receive any complaints from AIDS victims, Hale expecta to receive some "sooner or later." NOW Officer to Speak to CHE The November meeting of Citizens for Human Equality (CHE) will be held Tues· day, November 12 in the 9th floor meeting room of the Houston House, 1617 Fannin. The guPst speaker will be Nancy Har­rington, vice pr~ident of the Texas Chap­ter of the National Organization for Women (NOW). She will address the group and answer any questions. Cocktails will be served at 7:30 p.m. and the meeting will begin at8. CHE's regular meeting will follow. All interested persons are invited to attend. NOVEMBER 8. 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 7 NBC's 'Early Frost' is Serious Drama About AIDS By Scott Custinger Montrose Voice Film Critic On Monday, November 11, NBC (Channel 2) will present the first network film to deal with AIDS and the effects of this fatal and mysterious disease. An Early Frost is a serious attempt to dramatize a young man's struggle with AIDS as his family and lover face the trauma of tragedy. More importantly, the film makes a definite effort to educate and inform the public about this fearful health problem that we know so little about. Of course, it is easy for dramas about terminal illnesses to become maudlin and weepy. Thanks to a courageously open script (by Ronald Cowen and Daniel Lip­man) and performances that probe instead of manipulate, An Early Frost makes the correct impact. The characters seem to grow in their understanding of homosexuality and AIDS, each respond­ing initially with anger and denial but eventually overcoming fears and frustra­tions. Michael (Aidan Quinn) is a young law­yer who is a hard worker and future partner in the firm. When a persistant cough and night sweats force him to the doctor, he finds that his glands are swollen. When he is later hospitalized for shortness of breath and severe coughing, the doctor tells him that he has pneumo­nia and possibly an acquired immune defi­ciency (AlDS). His lover Peter (D.W. Moffet) doesn't react well to the news, promptly telling his friends who in turn refuse to come to their house. Peter is caring but distant, admit­ting to some affairs with other men. Michael tells him there has never been anyone else for him, and forces his lover to leave. Alone and scared, Michael leaves Chi­cago to cling to the people that he knows really love him-hie family. Mom and Dad are shocked at having to deal with a reve­lation of Michael's homosexuality. The news of his illness on top of this is almost devastating. Thankfully, the mother (excellenUy played by Gena Rowlands) grips herself and takes hold of the situation. She over­comes her fears, reading available AIDS materials and trying to help her husband Sylvia Sidney portrays Beatrice, the grandrnQther of Michael, in "An Early Frost" Aidan Quinn stars as Michael Pierson, an AIDS victim and pregnant daughter overcome prejudi­ces and skepticism. It is an uphill battle as she struggles with her own heartfelt emo­tions and the love for her dying son. Sylvia Sidney is also an important back­bone to the story as Michael's grand­mother, Beatrice. Although the rest of the family leaves her in the dark far too long, she perhaps deals with the situation better than anyone. She tells Michael, " It's a dis­ease, not a disgrace. That's what I told your grandfather when there were people-friends-who were afraid to visit him because he had cancer. They thought if he breathed on them, they'd develop a tumor.That's how people are." All we have to do is look at the recent election and political situationin Houston to realize that people do panic at the unknown. With all the misinformation, death statistics and homophobia in the air, there is bound to be panic in the streets. It's too bad that An Early Frost wasn't aired earlier, but maybe the Straight Sla te bible-thumpers will come off thl'ir high horses long enough to look at AIDS in the proper perspective. In the film, Michael's doctor hits the message home when he tells him that "It's not a gay disease, and it never was. A virus doesn't know or care what our sexual preference is . .. . So until we find a cure or vaccine, everyone has a reason to be con­cerned. There is not an excuse for ignor­ance anymore. Everyone is going to have to overcome prejudices and respond with compassion to the victims who need love and understanding. The film touches lightly on a few social problems that are occurring including ref­usal of ambulance service, physical con­tact, and rejection of friends. There are so many emerging ethical, political and per­Ronal problems involved here that it's impossible to dwell long on any one mat­ter. (We'll leave that to shows like "Broth­ers" and "Trapper John"). But the heart of the matter lies in responding to AIDS vic­tims not just because of "who" they are, but because they need support and care. l)f course, An Early Frost is doubly effective because people must come to grips with not only AIDS, but homosexual­ity. It was refreshing to see that some of Michael's family wished that he would have told them sooner. A scene where the mother must deal with the apperance of Michael's "unknown" lover of two years is also truly touching. While the complica­tions of "coming out" are overshadowed by AIDS, the various aspects of a gay lifes­tyle are presented positively. The weak link in the film is the father, played by Ben Gazzarra. We all know how most fathers react to homosexuality, but his father broods and suffers much too long. His character is confusing, one moment carrying his son to the car when he has a seizure and the next refusing to talk to him. Fortunately, the cast works well around Aiden Quinn, who doesn't over-dramatize or seem stereotypical. He is a human being who is dealing with crucial issues and not just a pathetic, sympathetic gay man. Reacting as well as he does to the various situations, it is almost unbelievable when he tries to commit suicide Still, stress is something that can drive us to madness without the support of friends and family. Voters wait to cast their ballots at Felix's Rei;taurant An Early Frost is no theatrical marvel, but it is an understanding and powerful attempt to help the public understand AIDS and even homo~exuality. It is also important that people see two men having a relationship and also that gay men (as well as all AIDS victims) are going to need love and care. Like the earlier film Con­senting Adult, An Early Fra~t take., a stab at dramatizing an important issue directly and po~itively . Hopefully, people will open their hearts and minds, because this is a film that is not soon forgotten. 8 MONTROSE VOICE I NOVEMBER 8, 1985 U.S. Supreme Court Will Hear Georgia Sodomy Case Texas Sodomy Law Case May Follow Suit The United States Supreme Court on Mon· day agreed to hear arguments on the con­stitutionality of the Georgia sodomy law to have the law ruled unconstitutional. The law makes oral sex illegal, punishable by a maiximum of 20 years in prison. The justicei; will review a ruling by the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that is being challenged by the state of Georgia. The appellate court ordered a federal court trial of a lawsuit challenging the statute. A federal district judge, Robert H. Hall, threw out Hardwick's lawsuit, citing the 1976 Supreme Court ruling upholding the Virginia sodomy law. On May 21 , the 11th Circuit reinstated Michael Hardwick was arrested in Hardwick'i; lawsuit. August 1982 in his Atlanta home and charged with committing sodomy with another man. Georgia's sodomy law app­lies to all people-single, married, hetero· sexual or homosexual. The state of Georgia is seeking to pre­vent a hearing of the lawsuit. The high court has avoided detailed rul­ings on homosexual matters since 1967 when it ruled that alient; may be deported Although prosecutor1> did not seek an if found to be homosexual In the Virginia indictment against Hardwick, he filed suit ~·) Nobody luns Fon lus. We can put you in the car of your choice without putting you into debt WE LEASE ALL MAKES & MODELS BUICK OLDS CADILLAC '86 Somerset 164 Mo. '86 Deville Coupe '86 Park Ave . . • 263 Mo. '86 Ciera • . . . • 164 Mo. '85 98 Regency 244 Mo. . .......... . . 289Mo. '86 El Dorado • 319Mo. FORD BMW NISSAN '86 Mustang .. 149Mo. '86 T-B1rd ••.•• 176Mo. '85 325e • . ..•• 314 Mo. '85 535 •....•• 409. Mo. '86 200SX 164Mo. '85 300ZX . •. •. 249 Mo. Call MOODI LOVE 973-0700 'EllAMPU: 16~.cec..°""'­~ SnP S10 •~00 a_4,,,,_Plty P•~ 518' ·~ 1303 UPLAND ~V.MJll>S lllM OO Five Pines Aparlrnenfs MONTROSE­BISSONNET­MUSEUM AREA Efficiencies at $200/mo. * Totally Remodeled all NEW carpets, drapes, mini-blinds, lights All Adult, Secured, Quiet Neighborhood, Covered Parking '$200 monthly for first 3 months, then increasing in increments to $225 monthly. DON DARRAGH Hansen Management 795-0478 case, the court ruled summarily-without detailed opinions. James Barber, attorney for Donald F. Baker, plaintiff in a lawsuit aimed at kil· ling the Texas sodomy law, feels that the Supreme Court's decision to hear the Geor-o Sign of the Times gia case shows that "they are ready to deal with the issue." Baker plans to appeal, to the Supreme Court, the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals' decision of last August upholding the Texas statute. Louie's yard sign gets put in the trash 'Times of Harvey Milk,' AIDS Series to Air Thurs. The Tirrlf!s of Haruey Milk, the 1984 Academy Award-winning 90-minutedocu­mentary, will premiere on Wednesday, Nov. 13, at 9:00 p.m. on Channel 8. The film traces the political career and assasination of one of the nation's first openly-gay elected officials. The documentary includes interviews with Milk's co-workers, friends and politi· cal allies, and dramatic archival footage of Diane Feinstein-the President of the Board of Supervisors-announcing that both Mayor George Moscone and Supervi· sor Harvey Milk had been shot and killed in their offices at City Hall by City Super­visor Dan White. Other news footage creates a riveting account of the times of Harvey Milk: the mid-1970s, when the gay community of San Francisco, riding a wave of power and popularity, collided head-on with the first stirrings of the Moral Majority The Times of Haruey Milk captures the pain, shock and outrage San Franciscans felt when they learned of the murders of Milk and Moscone. Over 40,000 people gathered in the streets of San Francisco in a silent candlelight tribute in memory of the two slain leaders. Interviews and news footage also reveal the anger which propelled a night of riots following White's trial, in which he was sentenced to seven years imprisonment for involuntary manslaughter on a dimin· ished capacity plea. With raw emotions, Milk's friends and associates discusi; the effect he had on their lives. The Times of Haruey Milk shows how this respected city official shattered gay stereotypes, and how, as a politican, Milk forged alliances across San Francisco's varied communities and intereeta. A passionate and moving portrait of a man who proudly and successfully fought for his beliefs, The Times of Haruey Milk received the 1984 Academy Award for Best Feature Documentary, and the New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Documentary of 1984. The film was directed by Robert Epstein and Richard Schmeichen, produced by Black Sand Pro­ductions and the Television Laboratory at WNET / New York, and is narrated by Har· vey Fierstein. Also on the same evening, Channel 8 will present a three part series on AIDS. "Medical Update AIDS" features host Christopher Bryan-Brown, M.D. and Peter Mansell, M.D .. professor of Clinical Cancer Prevention, U.T. System Cancer Center, M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute. The three programs, beginning at 10:30 p.m .. will explore the cause, effects and diagnosis of AIDS; local reaction and community response to the epidemic, and new drug therapies and approaches to treatment of AIDS and opportunistic infections. o Correction The article " Life On the Line: 3 Computer Bulletin Boards Specialize in Montrose," which appeared in the Nov. 1 edition, con· tained an error. The correct phone number for the Mont· rose Network is 864-3904. The Montrose Voice regrets any incon· venience caused by this error. NOVEMBER 8, 1985 MONTROSE VOICE 9 Sports Voice HouTex V Promises New Winners By Rich Corder Special to the Montrose Voice HouTex V gets underway Saturday morn­ing at 9 a.m. with the largest field in his­tory. New this year are competitions in C Doubles and a Round-Robin Mixed Dou­bles event. Also new this year will be the winners. The 1984 champions are either entered in new events or unable to play. Here are the seeds: Championship Singles: No. 1 seed is Fred Orange of West Hollywood, Calif. He was a finalist in the Los Angeles Tourna­ment this past summer and has won the Texas·OU Classic in Dallas for the past two years. No. 2 is Houston's Tim Cal­houn, who was not entered in singles last year. No. 3 is "Sheba," formerly of Kansas City, now featured in L.A. (You just gotta see her play to believe it! Come have a thrill.) No. 4 seed is Scott Williford from San Diego. Scott played Sheba in the consola­tion finals last May in San Francisco's "Open." This division dropped from 25 last summer to only 19 this year, but the play promises to be quite interesting! B Singles: This division is the largest at 31 (only 22 entered in 1984), and the committee seeded six players. No. 1 is Houston's Armi Alabanza who won the Texas-OU last month over Dallas' Al Leong 6-3, 6-4. They may be headed for a rematch as Al has been made the No. 2 seed. Armi's best showing in Hou Tex was as a Consolation B finalist in 1983. Last fall he was eliminated in the quar­terfinals by Houston's Chai Wilaichon, who is presently on work assignment in China and has to miss this year. And, last year's finalists are not entered, so it looks like a "who can knock off Armi or Al" division C Singles: This division is really responsible for the great increase in the size of the tournament. We might add, it is also responsible for increased interest in tennis in Texas as well as the rest of the nation. 1984's tournament had eight entries. This year's edition of HouTex has 26. The 1984 champ, Richard Robicheaux, has been pushed up to playing B Singles. Semifinalist Larry Jarvis is still in C, but the committee must think his game is a hut rusty. So, 1984 semifinalist Eddie Chavez has hN>n made the No. 1 seed. Eddie defeated his doubles partner, Randy Miller 6·4, 6-2 at Texas-OU last month. so his game may really be "on." No. 2 seed is Thomas Cortez who was not entered last year. No. 3 is Ronnie Muus11, coming back from a toe injury reaulting in him dropping down from the B Singles division h«> played last year. No. 4 is Margaret Wilson, past president of Dallas' Oak I .awn Tennis Association. Jn 1984, she lost to eventual winner Richard Robicheaux, so she could be in position to take the top prize this year. Actually, Houston's Billy Green beat her 6-4, 6-0 for the consolation trophy last fall, so he should really be considered a threat to go all the way now! Championship Doubles: HouTex bills this as the National Championship and we could, in fact, see a "face from last year" but not as the same team who won it in 1984. Houston's Tim Calhoun is play· ing us "make-up team member" with Jon Block from San Francisco. They have been made the No. 3 seed, as Dallas' duo of always-formidable, regardless·of.who­the- partner-is (legendary) Don Draper is paired with fellow OLTA member Jon Papp and are favored to win. No. 2 seed is a make-up team of Duane Gabrielson (Kansas City) and newcomer to Dallas, Tom Faucf'tt. They played well tog~ther for the first time at Texas-OU Classic, so they will be a team to watch here. No. 4 seed is Ken Leonard and Sheba. Talk about a team to watch! B Doubles. David Robicheaux won the title with fellow Houston Tennis Club member Jim Sterling, but 1985 finds him teamed with his son Richard, who is prob­ably the "most improved player we know ... They are only the No. 2 seeded team, as the Texas·OU champs of Dallas' Joe Phillips and Frank Guerrero are the favorites. Phillips. Guerrero beat R&R 7-5, 4-6, 6-0 in Dallas. No. 3 is Houston's team of Armi Alabanza and David Garza. This doubles division is greatly enhanced this year, growing from only seven teams in 1984 to 15 this year! · C Doubles: New this year, there are eight teams entered. B Doubles Consola­tion finalists at Texas-OU, the team of Eddie Chavez and Randy Miller, are the big favorites in this C Division. No. 2 seed is the San Francisco team of James Mock and Ken Dyches. My favorite would have to be Houston's Steve Bearden and Bill Santaiti who have been playing very well lately and scored a win over Miller and Chavez back in September 1-6, 6-3, 6-3. Spectators are invited to drop by Mac­Gregor Park Saturday, Sunday and Mon­day for the matches. Quite a festival is planned. WWB Needs Players The WWB Bowling League started their new season on October 27. After taking last weekend off, the league will resume play this Sunday, November 10, 6:00 p.m. at Post Oak Lanes. The league is in need of players of both sexes and all levels of play. The season will last 12 weeks with a cost of $6.50 per week. There are four players per team. Individuals as well as already formed teams are welcome. Some of the highlights of the league include trivial questions for free drinks and raffles for bowling balls. At the end of the season, extra money will be used for a barbeque and beer bust. The league also gives an award for the team that drinks the most beer during the season. "The lane welcomes players. We don't care if they are beginners, never bowled before or e~perienced," says Myrt Bading, speaker for the league. For more information on WWB bowling, call Bading at 723-1455 or come to Post Oak Lanes this Sunday. 1·10oi, O'FF1Amn,:m- l:AbmTo'.,.o~ 0 e A/C. REPAIR "'°' I:;: • vw SPECiALISTS !:?1 : & FOREIGN CARSa: I~ ~~i~ • OVER 10 YEARS ~I ~ EXPERIENCE I~ SAT. • ENGINE ~, lz CARS OVERHAULS Q OrRUCK • ELECTRICAL zt '~CYCLES WORK ~, 10 a: .~ TEXAS STATE ~I t~ INSPECTION STATIO : 1: 238 WEST GRAY ~ I ~ 528-2886 I~ · OPtN z SAM ·5 30PM I ~ . TWO LANES I i':i. FAST SERVICE .,,, 0 e AUTO REPAIRS le I ~ . MUFFLERS • TIRES • CONVERTERS ~I ~'ll~O!f ~RI! ~DJ;_A~f!.l~Of!.I Sports Voice Calendar & Standings Regular Weekly Events SUNDAY: Frontrunners, Memorial Park Ten­nis Center Houston Tennis Club 9am-Noon. Homer Ford Tennis Center Women's Bowling League Spm, Stadium Bowl WW.B. Bowling League 7:30pm. Post Oak Lanes MONDAY: MSA Men's Bowling 9pm, Sta· dium Bowl TUESDAY: Frontrunners. Memorial Park Tennis Center MSA "Fun Volleyball League," 7pm WEDNESDAY: Houston Tennis Club plays 7:30pm Homer Ford Tennis Center THURSDAY: Frontrunners. Memorial Park Tennis Center MSA Mixed Bowling League 9pm, Sta­dium Bowl Special Events Nov. 9-11 Houston Tennis Assn. "Hou-Tex V" June 1986: Oak Lawn Tennis Assoc. hosts Texas Cup Challenge, Dallas, competing with Houston Tennis Club Summer 1986: United States Olympic Fesll· val, Houston Houston Tennis Club Challenge L'"adder matches through Nov 3 TOP TEN LADDER 1 Jim Kitch 2 Randall Dickerson 3 Arml Albanu 4 Donny Kelley 5 Rick Hadnot 1 Rick Dupont 2 Oscar Martinez 3 Edward de Leon 4 Richard Pregeant 5 Ron McCauley 6 Ron Bell 7 JC. Barrera 8 David He~and 9TinyT1m 10 Roch Corder BLADDER 6 Sebastian Velez 7 Lou Garza s Thomas Cortez 9 Larry Jarvis 10 Ronnie Rodnguez C LADDER 1 Ronnie Mauss 2 Steve Bearden 3 David Garza 4 Eddie Chavez 5 Joe L 6 Rock Knapp 7 Gabe Herpon 8 Rock Massey 9 Billy Green 10 Mr Bill D LADDER 1 Steve Bryant 2 Roy Mend•Ola 3 John Murphy 4 Da1w1d Hendnckson 5 Oscar Ysass' 6 Joe D 7 JV Klinger 8 Randy Moller 9 Mike Holloway 10 Steve Chesney E LADDER 1 David Moskowitz 2 Howard Brown 3 Rudy Garcia DOUBLES LADDER 1 Bob Hop1<1ns & R•ck Hadnot 2 Arm• Alabanza & David Garza 3 Donny Kelley & Roch Corder 4 Ror.noe Rodnguez & Richard Pregeant 5 Steve Bearden & Boll Santa1t1 6 Billy Green & Paul Brown 7 David Heoland & Marty 8 Eddie Chavez & Randy M'ller MSA Pool League Final Standings. Summer League TEAM 1 Bacchus I 2 TheBam 3 Ranch Hands 4 611111 5 llpshck 6 Bacchus II 7 Street Cats a JR°s 9 Kindred Spirits I 10 BAB Cowboys 11 E!J's 12 Kindred Sp1nts II 13 Too611 14 Als Plls 15 The611 16 Rancheroos 17 Sally's Shooters 18 Hooters 19 Yard Dogs Total Matches. Total garMS 18~ 2<»-121 16-6 21~111 16-6 194-136 16-6 186-144 15-7 194-136 15-7 193-137 15-7 1S1-149 14-8 204-125 13-9 175-155 12-10 163-167 11-11 14~181 1C>-12 165-185 !H3 181-149 7-15 148-184 s-16 153-1n 6-16 142-187 6-16 122-208 4-17 10&-207 4-17 107-208 May We lntroduc:.e Ourselves? Fifteen years aqo, Whole Earth Provision Company wa5 founded on the. princ.1ple of offe.rinq alternative. merchandise c.hosen on the basis of q_ualrty, function, durability and c.omfort. Disc.over our beautiful new store 1n Houston. Explore our legendary selection of travel tools, c.asual and travel c.loth1nq and footwear, technic.al outdoor eq_uopment ~ lhousands of spec.ialty books and maps. Let us introduc.e you to our Nature Discovery depart­ment with its wonder-s of the natural wor-ld. Whole Eartli Provision Co. Houston. Alabam.i She.pherd Center 52b·S22b 10 MONTROSE VOICE I NOVEMBER 8. 1985 The Far Side by Gary Larson The morning dew sparkled on Bill's web. The decoys were in place, his fly call was poised, and luck was in the air. Tempers flare when Professor Carlson and Lauell, working independently, ironically set their lime machines to identical coordinates ·~ ~ ,,,,/_ '"The picture's pretty bleak. gentlemen. - The world's climates are changing, the mammals are taking over. and we all have a brain about the size al a walnu1." Stupid clerks "If there're monsters moving in next door, Danny, you just ignore them. The more you believe in them. the more they'll try to get you." Al the Comedians' Cemetery Fortunes On the Road for Pisces By Mark Orion For Ff/day. Nov 8, 1985. through Thursday. Nov. 14. 1985 ARIES-Anyone lucky enough to have you for a friend 1s going to have a terrific weekend. Your ability to make others feel good will give you satisfaction. Smiles and laughter makes this weekend yours, so play host to the city. TAURUS- Things are looking very green for you right now. Very interesting. This is a good time for investing, even gambling. Whatever you do with money, do it with serious consideration. and you'll come out ahead. A lucky time. GEMINI-Sex, sex, sex. Doesn't anyone just cuddle any more? But seriously, Gemini, "desire" is the key word this week You'll know what to do­safely, of course CANCER-You're still the one calling the shots this weekend. still in the catbird seat. Whoever it is that you want to tell something to is in the mood to listen. But don't be wishy-washy about it. Speak up! Be firm! They'll love it. LEO-Your mind's on overtime this weekend, figuring things out and getting them in order. You've got the energy and inclination to accomplish a lot. Don't let outside distractions get in your way, however humpy they seem. VIRGO-Taking care of business, put­ting things in order, doing the right thing at the right time. That's what you're about. Your timing is impeccable, your road is clear A real sense of accomplish­ment by next week's end. LIBRA- Call someone you've been meaning to call, or catch up on your letter writing. Long distance communication is highlighted. and you could hear from someone you've been longing to reach. Incoming or outgoing, your communica­tion will express your generosity. SCORPIO- Be adventurous. Be brave. Be daring. Go 1n search for what you're after. If you're sure of what you want, you'll find 11 this week. Even though you're not a heavy cruiser, heavy eye contact could bring some interesting results. SAGITTARIUS- Nothing's going to slow you down this week All systems are go, no matter what happens. That's nice for your career, but 1t could play havoc with romance Besides knowing what you really want, make sure you know who you really love. CAPRICORN - It's a take charge and do 11, go get' em kind of time. At work and at play, you're the one in the driver's seat. Whatever or whoever you're making will benefit. Enjoy your position! AQUARIUS- This might-makes-right altitude is going, going. gone. Sweet and soft are what you're going to change into. Frustrations and disappointments are now out the door so you can try a little • tenderness. Macho Person You can do it. PISCES- If you've been putting off getting away, now's the time for it. An unplanned vacation or a weekend in the country will be just what you need while the November weather 11 perfect. After starring so brightly on your own turf, it's time to take your show on the road. What pleasures there are yours to find . NOVEMBER 8. 1985 MONTROSE VOICE 11 Seeking the Reigns of G PC By Ray Hill When I announced for the presidency of the Gay Political Caucus two years ago, I expressed concern about the caucus and the direction of our community. Events since have generally supported the valid­ity of those concerns. I am announcing in this article for the same position in the January 1986 GPC election. What follows are some thoughts and ideas I think a re important right now. For all its history, Gay Political Caucus has attempted to get into the mainstream of Houston/ Harris County politics. Jn the last two years the mainstream has been cutting a new course across the political delta. Further attempts to follow the new course may not be in the best interest of our community. The religious right, manifested locallv in the Straight Slate, is pushing politi­C" ians around. The men m our community are reeling from the fear of AIDS. The women from setbacks in the ERA and assaults on the freedom of choice issues. Being beaten ~everrly in the referendum did not bring us any cht·t·r last January. We st·em to hav1• developed a "bunker" mentality, tunneling even deeper with each new attack. We an• in u detl'riorating situation, undcrstaffrd and underfunded. Our pres­ent situatmn is one of trying to defend what little we have rather than trying to move ahead with an agenda. The agenda I propose is the realization that, nght now, gay men and lesbians are and must continue to fight as "cheerlead· crs for the Constitution and Bill of Rights." Yes, that mav sound trite and ovl'rly patriotic, hut it shouldn't. History shows that during substantial periods of tim£• tht• rolt• of "rhcNlenders" has fallen on the shouldl'rs of the Chinese in the Ray Hill has announcrd his plans to se~k the GPC presidency weskrn states and the Irish in the eastern states in the I 9th century; the blacks ever· ywhere through mohl of the last and all of the pn•scnt c1•ntury, and us for the last dl'cade. Rcfore the laHt few years we felt we had MER I DI E N LE AS I NG I NC. We Make Your Automotive Needs A Pleasant Experience '86 MERCEDES BENZ 190[ JOOE 5b0Sl 34'1'mo 498/mo 725/mo Xlb '86 JAGUAR 5b9/mo '86 PORSCHE 944 944 Turbo 398'mo 498'mo '86 HONDA Accord Prelude 159/mo 179/mo 325i 528e 735i '85 BMW 345/mo 425.mo 549.mo '86 CADILLAC DeVille 329/mo Commentary no constitutional rights as gay men and lesbians. Many of us still have that opin· ion. But those of us who have overcome the guilt and self-condemnation we all used to share, have come to expect our rights as free and deserving people. All of us must come to the realization of our own worth and value and one way to do that is to study and learn the contract between our government and its people: the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. These documents are not really compli· cated. They.are written in English and I don't need a lot of lawyers and judges to tell me what they mean. I can read and figure it out myself and so can each of you. Together we need to understand our rights and defend them for our,elves, oRe another and e\'eryone else. I have nothing bad to say about my opponent. Sue Lovell is a wondE"rful caring person and a strong, capable activist, for whom I have great respect and love. Our diffen•nccs are matters of style, analy,i~ and approach. Our backgrounds and posi· lions on the issues are clearly open for your judgeml'nt. To vote in a GPC election one must be a paid m1·mber of the caucus for 30 days prior to the election The next GPC meet· mg is Nov. 20 at 7:30 p.m. at the Dignity Center, Fannin and Elgin. For member· ship information, call GPC at 521-1000. The election "';Ube held in January, 1966. The opinions of the entire community on the leadership of the caucus i.-. needed, as 1s your help and support in accompli>•hing the difficult tasks before us Join now to help build a brighter, more proud future. I Editor's note.· So far, tuJo candidates have stated the1rintent1ons torunfor GPCpres· 1dent in 1986. longtime gay activist Ray Hill and the pre.sent incumbant. Sue Loi•e/l.J '86 TOYOTA '86 BUICK ---=-8'-6= -MAZDA CALL LEE BORBA Camry Celie a 172/mo 185/mo Skylark Electra 179/mo 279/mo RX-7 626 209/mo 178/mo NEAR THE GALLERIA NO DOWN PAYMENT • LOWER MONl HLY PAYMENT • CASH FOR YOUR TRADE (n3J 975-1986 ll~XAS STATE OPTICAL CEi= Dr. E. Burt Denton & Associates OPTOMETRISTS TSO- \' ill age 2.515 University 528- 1589 TSO-South Main 44J.1 Main 523-.">109 Both OHic('s Under New Ownership and Management HAIR LOSS­NEW MEDICAL TREATMENT Male pattern ba ldness occurs when the h ormone DHT acts on hair foJli. cles. Proxidil a is an advanced combination of topical DHT-block· ing agents with the hair growth· stimulator Minoxidil. It commonly arrests and reverses balding when Minoxidil alone does n ot. Call today for a consultation . Peter H. Proctor, MD,PhD MPB Clinic Suite 10, 5401 Dashwood, Bellaire 661-2321 1525 WESTHEIMER HOUSTON 529-22$9 BURGER SPECIALS Steakburger-51.49 Cheeseburger-51 .69 Bacon Cheeseburger- 51.99 FRIES 50¢ with Burger EXPIRES 11114/85 12 MONTROSE VOICE I NOVEMBER 8. 1985 Montrose Live 'Not In Mixed Company' Opens New Di~ner Theater By Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voicl' Theatl'r Critic Not In Mt:xl'd Company is the first produc· tion of the new Hilton Dinner Theater. It is nice That should be about the best that could be said about 1t. Unfortunately, it is tied for the best non muSlcal comedy to open in town so far this season. In the land of the fizzles, the okey-dokcy is king. If you read more of the progl'Bm maga­zine than the information on the specific show, I'm sure you'll remember Jim Bernhard's witty puzzles and Christmas poems. He wrote plenty of \\'it into this play, but don't CJtpect one liner~ like Simon. This is a warm nnd fuzzy like Jean Kerr wrote so well. David Silberman almost never leaves the stage. He's good. but his extrememly laid back style, reminiscent of Bob Newhart, leaves the way open for Pat Cook to really be the shining eye-cathcer of the evening. Cook's performance of the bumbling, half-crazed psychiatrist is really funny, sort of like Howard, Bob's next door neighbor Kay Pering as the bimbo, Donna Whit· more os the feuding, just consciousness­raised wife and Karla Brandau as the lawyer (who starts out n lot like the secre­tary in Washington, but then melts) embrace the trendy theme on Houston stages this year. Adorably uppity women ore up ngnmst male chauvenism, all over town! We've left Inst season's rash ofrapes behind us and arc now at the conference table. Will this continue after the New Year or will Kate's closing spcach put the cap on 1t for everybody next month ot the Alley? Stay tuned' The food ot tpis dinner theater 1s sur prisingly good For example, the chicken is moist. The seating, at long tables with other couples, is more functional than romantic. The drive is long and, at that time of day, clogged with traffic. The nice little show will remind of you of a TV sit· com. You have a chance to see Donna Whit· more clo er to the Montrose. She alter­nates with Michelle Watkins as Fern in Charlotte's Web over at Stage,. All in all, this Web might be a little too much of a very good thing. For adults, this is an excellent play. For young children, it's a little too long. Director Rebecca Johanson should have made some careful deletionA. Cute little Gary Livingood is superb as Wilbur the pig. The role might have been thought of as bit of a "stretch." but a pair of hugely baggy pants hides any lack of girth. All kidding aside, the character fits him like a glove. He's fantastic. The supporting cast is hugely entertain-ing, as well. The only debately pomt1s Charlotte her· self Mary Hooper s performance is con sistcnt and effective. But it is not the character I was expecting. She's not a .sweet little motherly lady with her heir in a bun. She's a very motherly punk rocker, instead. Keith Belli is one of Houston's greatest set designers. Herc once again he creates a thing of true beauty. The set starts out as a storybook and gradually unfolds to make oeveral different locations. It also incorpo­rates soft sculpture. It's a dream of a very spcc1al pop-up book. o Notes There's a little bit of East Texas in Eng· land tight now. Joe Seers and Jaston Wil· Iiams arc touring their Greater Tuna there HSO's off on tour throughout the Midw· est and down the East Coast, including Carnegie Hall. ... Jerr.v'.s Girls, which played here last summer, is about to open in NYC. Leslie Uggams is still with 1t, but Dorothy Lou· don and Chi ta Rivera have replaced Carol Channing and Andrea McCardlc. So we got to sec the cast on the record, and they won't .... ' "With the Alley operating in the black and with a substantial cash reserve, I felt it was time to begin to build for the future." So saying, an anonymous donor pres· en ted them with a gift of $1 million for its endowment. "I'm overwhelmed," exclaimed Pat Brown, art1st1c/ executive director of the . Alley "I believe that now we can begin•to build a year-round ,company and attract new plays and playwrights .•.• o Openings Carrrn'n (Galveston's Ball H.S., 8) "Oh, Mr. Faulkner, Do You Write?" (Lanier Middle School, 8}-John Max­well'" one man show. A benefit for l/H Inc., the gay arts umbrella group. Follow· ing the performance on Friday, there will be a champagne gala at Toni Jones Gallery, 1131 Bertha, near the Museum of Fine Art.' The play and reception coot$25. The play alone $10. Tickets at Ticketron (526-1709) or call 524-0409. Outu·ard Bound (Theater Southwest, 8)-F.veryone's trapped on a cruise ship They don't remember why they're there or where they're going. Paul Taylor Dance Company (Jones, 8}-witty and upbeat. James South (San Jacinto College, 9}­trumpeter appears with the Pasadena Philharmonic. ONO! Zany p,;ychiatrist Dr. Bruno Lobo{{ (Pat Cook) 111 analyzed by hi,; client, Phil Lear (Ron Silberman) in "Not in Mixed Company" Gary /,wm11wood as Wilbur, Marianne Pendino (center) as TPmpll'ton, and Donna Whitmore as Fern m "Charlotte's Web" at Stages The Nl'w Quicksilver The Paul Taylor Dance Company The New ~uicksilver (West University Community Center, 9)-The San Antonio River Coyotes, too. Bluegrass. ONO! The Wind and the Willows (Company C>nstage, 9). • The Golden Grotto (Main Street, 10)-A children's play about the love between a princess and a grog, assisted by a Val· kyrie a nd a dragon. On an adult level, it's a lso a spoof of grand opera. The Pou-er and the Pas.~on of Beethoven (Museum of Fine Arts, 10, 4 p.m.)-a key· hoard conversation, a lead·in to the HSO's 12/8 performance. ONO! Town Meeting (Stages, 11)-Swindley and Dubay explain the new company poli· ctes and structure (including new audition procedures.) Design for /,wing (Cadillac Bar, 13)­headlines a $50 per person benefit for Chocolate Bayou's building fund. ONO! GuwllP (Jones, 14)-Houi;ton Ballet in the beautiful Peter Wright production, noted for its style and drama. 1411 Taft 522-2190 * Cooling System check a nush $27~ * A/C Charge a Check $26~ * Oil, Filter a Lube $2495 ASIC FOR CHIEF llUTTROCK nme to check your Cooling system' SERVICE PLUS DJ:r.:.fi.JSJ~' :HV~~J'fll "Where the World Meets Houston" 106 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006 (713) 523-2218 ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED YOUR HOSTS: Albert G. Nemer, John J. Adams and Gordon A. Thayer NOVEMBER 8. 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 TEXAS GAY RODEO 1985 The Second Annual Texas Gay Rodeo will take place November 14-17, 1985, In Houston. Rodeo performances will be held at the Houston Farm and Ranch Club on Highway 6, two miles north of Interstate 10 (Katy Freeway). SCHEDULE OF EVENTS FOR THE RODEO FOLLOWS: *THURSDAY, 8PM, NOVEMBER 14 AT THE BRAZOS RIVER BOTTOM • Selecllon of MISS Texas Gay Rodeo, 1965 * FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15 AT THE HOUSTON FARM AND RANCH CLUB • 11AM-Sefect1on of Mr a~d Ms. Texas Gay Rodeo 1985 • Evening· ·Starting at 8PM • Performance.-by dance groups • Barn dance wrth music by Dena Kaye • Announcement of Mr, Ms , Miss Texas Gay Rodeo 1985 *SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16 • Noon- First rodeo performance at the Houston Farm and Rancl> Club • Evening-Tours of Houston bars *SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17 AT THE HOUSTON FARM AND RANCH CLUB • Noon-Second rodeo performance, followed by danc1rg to Dena Kaye and announcement of rodeo winners FOOD. BEER, ANO SET-UPS MAY BE PURCHASED AT THE HOUSTON FARM AND RANCH CLUB AT All TIMES Tickets for events at the Houston Farm and Ranch Club may be purchased either for individual events or for the complete package. lnd1v1dual costs are 5for Fridayevemng performances and $10 for each of the rodeo performances. All three may be purchased as a package for $22 Tlckeb may be purch•Hd In advance by malling pay,,,.,,! to: T.G.R.A., P.O. Box 66973, Suite 1194, Hou1ton, THU n006 or at the following bu1lneue1: In Houaton: The Bam, Bacchu1, The Brazot River Bollom, Kindred Splrtt1, The Ranch, Tha Ripcord and TWT. In Dallu : The RO<J...S.Up. During lhe rodeo, tickets will be available at the Houston businesses, the host hotel and the rodeo grounds. Members of the Houston Organ1Zation of Bar Owners (HOBO) are planning to have a fleet of vans to provide transportation among the hotels. the rodeo 11te. end Houston bars A schedule of the tours will be available at the host hotel. the rOdeo arena end partie1pat1ng bars • HOUSTON FARM ANO RANCH Ci..UB NOW LEASING ---With Opdon to Purchase- - - l..af'le Beautiful Swimming Pool Controlled Entry Security Remote Controlled Garage Entry Hltb Elflclency AC & Heating One Bed.room - One Bath One Bedroom With Lott - One Bath 1'wo Bed.room - Two Bath Two Bedroom - 1'wo Bath Townbou.e From $375.00 a month FREE! 19 INCH COLOR TV WITH A TWO YEAR LEASE Office Open Dally 11 :00-6:00 2507 Montrose Houston, Texas 524-0830 14 MONTROSE VOICE I NOVEMBER 8, 1985 . mlms New Films: 'To Live & Die in L.A.' & 'Natty Gann' By Scott Cutsinger Montrose Voice Film Critic The most exciting moVIe event this week was not at the neighborhood theater, but at a video ,tore on Waugh Drive. Actress Jane Fonda stopped in to promote her latest exercise video. and it was truly a memorable event. N'ow, anyone who knowh me realizes that she is a goddess to me. I've been a fan of hers for many yeari; through all the controversy, protests and eventual fame and honors. When I finally stumbled up to meet her, it was sheer delight. A stunning woman in her late forties, Fonda was every bit the petite and beautiful '<tar that I had imagined her to be. As she ,;hook rriy hand and signed my Klute poster, I felt like I could collapse ma heap on the floor. Thinking back on that dazzling smile and that brief moment of contact, I know that I can now dir a happy man I guess that we could talk about our two new films, To Lweand D1emL.A.,andthe Disney feature The Journey of Natty Gann \Vhile neither one is a must see, both contain some interesting scenes that rould be of Interest to moviegoers Thank heavens Chnstmas 1s almost here and soon the movie houses will be brimming with wonderful new cmema treats. We can only hope, can't we? o To Live and Die in L.A. Director William Fried kin has never quite lived up to the ballyhoo of his Oscar· winning film The French Conncetion in the seventiei;. The moodiness of Sorcerer and the gay·oriented Cruising later on never matched the taut drama or action of that engrossing film, and neither does his new flick To Lwe and Die in L.A This film has faint reminders of Connec· twn including spectacular car chases and mean, hardened law officers, but some­how the energy expelled never se<>ms to go anywhere. The script ambles along slowly the first half of the film, and then sud­denly swirls into an interesting but very confusing mess in the last 45 minutes. What we end up with is another talc of vengence where people take the law into their own hands. The story (by Gerald Petievich and Friedkin) concentrates on Richard Chance, a luggi!lh Secret SerVIcemnn who IS after a counterfeiting crook who mur· dered his partner Chance is a rather unlikable and rude man played by newco· mer William Peterson. He and his new partner John Vukovirh (John Pankow) .John Pankow (center) and William Peterson (r1ght1 star as two Srcrl't Sen•ice agents who recklessly stumble into an FBI "sting" operation run b.v agent Thomas Ung, portrayed by Michael Chong fl1•ft) in "11i f,ll'e and Die in l .. A." never build any sympathy from the audience because they treat each other and everyone else like dirt. The two men are hot on the trail of the murderer (William Defoe from Streets of Pirl'), a fiendish villain who snarls as he prints tons of "funny money " Posing as buyers of the fake money, Chance and Vukovich find that they need $50,000 to huy and the Secret Service won't let them have it. So they decide to swat it by rob· bing a Chinese gangster who has the cash on him (according to a hot tip). Unfortunately, the gangs'ler is part of an undercovM' FBI undercover scam, and the hoys end up scurrying away with a lot of agents hot on their tails. T\Je result is a breathtaking car rhase that is the high· light of the movie. Zooming down an I.A. freeway at 80 mph the wrong way is truly a hair raising experi!'nce. When they race a tram and then cut across in front of it, I thmk that my heart stopped. The end comes fast and furious with a double and triple cross that leave~ us very tired and confused. There is plenty of bloody but brief violence, but in a film like this they arc just senseless outbursts. In the end there 1s no moral or vengeful release, only a sense that things will remain like they were before. To /,we and D1c in L.A. has moments of visual glory, but Friedkin was probably wrong to use all unknown actors. There is no hero to root for, and the audiences lose interest trying to follow a bunch of bland actors careen through a cruddy city. Even - the Los Angeles locations are uninterest­ing, focusing on lifeless areas that seem to be in the city's far outer limits. The most thanklrss role goeR to(yes, you guessed it) a woman. Debra Feuer is an informer that Chance uses for info and sex. He abuses her by threatening to revoke her pnrole if she doesn't give him what he wants. This is a pathetic part for any woman, althouth Feuer struggles to make it appealing I really wanted to like this film, but nothing really dicks hrre. It's all just a slick, ensemble version of Dirty Harry or Death Wish without a well-defined hero. In the end, we could just really care less who will Live and Die in I.A. o The Journey of Natty Gann But times nre changing, and the current Reagonistic trend towards religion, fam ily and patriotism m11y bring wholE'.some family films back into the limelight. The succc•ss of the I>isney·like Back to the FuturC' JS no better example. The trick is to make the feature films seem mature and adult, but still fun and appealing to all ages. Recent featur('S like Escape to Witch Moutai11 and Condorman have failed to do this, so Disney hns suffered financially. Now Disney gives us The .Journey of Natty Gann, a wholesome Depression-era tale ahoul 11 girl searching for her father. In many ways it is typical of past Disnry fare-wild1•rness sc•en<'ry, cute charnC'lers and animals, and a story that is simple to follow. Hut this effort has a more adult feel to it, compll'tl' with a sprinkle of profanity and a screenplay that at least rises ahove a fifth grade und1>rstunding. The movie gets off to a grand start by evoking a tru<' Hl30's Depression "look." Production designer Paul Sylbert (Heaven Can Wait) and cinematographer Dick Bush (Victor, Victoria) have created an authentic aura that truly deserves an award. Even more stunning IS the outdoor photography of the Northwestern wilder· ness, which makes Natty's adventure a picturc·pcrft!Ct travelogue. The story of this 14·year·old tomboy tramping ucross the wilderness isn't very suspenst•ful or eventful. We know that her father didn't run off and leave her to get u new Joh (olthough she doesn't), and we know that they will gE't together in the end with a warful reunion Yet. we can stick with Natty on ht•r journey hecausE' it ii; an adventure-like running away from home with a purpose. Wt• mert some interesting people (like John Cusack as a young hobo) and we get to do fun things like hop on and off of moving trains The audience at the screening I attended was mostly older couples and familil'.s who seemed to love it. How cnn you not adore a cute actress likP Meredith Salenger, who is very talented and interesting to watch, And how c.an we resist the cute wolf that seems to stay at her side, although we find it highly improbable. The Journey of Natty Gann is a product that the Disney compnny can be proud of, although it won't rake in the big bucks. I was raised on wholesome Disney products and I can attest "to the fact that under­standing why a father would leave his child to get a job (even if it is the Depres· sion) is something that most most young people will not comprehend. Meredith Sa/,nl(er is Natty Gann, a 14 year-old tomboy looking for her father in "The Journey of Natty Gann" Walt Disney Productions has had it tough for the last two decades trying to appeal to a family audience that had slowly disinte­grated. They have always had the ani· mated classics like Snow White and Cinderella to fall back on for re-release!!, and their new adult-oriented features like Country and Spla,;h met with considers· ble sucC'ess. However, the core family audience that used to flock to Disney fea· lures have stayed away in droves. However, it is head and shoulders above the trash that most movies parents drop kids off to &l'e. So, in the end, this little film will hopefully fall into the niche of family enU>rtainment where it was intended, and where Walt intended for all his products to be. Books Tropic Lights Not the Brightest ,. .. _..b.. ..y... ..G.. erold Lebonoti ..._. ...... , ......... . ..., .._... ... .............. -... ,.,"' .... ~ ~ .. .. llMh< ........... t""-1• ............. . .....-. ...... ...,. 1-:r~ ~ ' - 21 Tropic Lights; Gerald Lebonatl; /1ct1on; 180 pages: Knights Pre ... PO Box 454. Pound Ridge, NY 10576; soft cover. $6. 95 ------ Reviewd by Linda Wyche Gerald Lebonati, in his first novel Tropic Lights, tackles one of the mdst complex and intense aspects of gay life­friendship. Unfortunately, Lebonati doesn't manage to shed much light on the subject in this, although ambitious, work. Tropic Lights follows three close friends-John, Carlos, and Matthew­through a year of "resolving conflicts and meeting challenges." However, as the reader gets to know these three, they seem so shallow and empty, it is difficult to mus­ter any sympathy for their conflicts or challenges. Mainly, they eat together (your place, mine, or a restaurant), meet lovers, and discuss each other's lovers. Lebonati presents us with little that expresses the intensity of a best-friend relationship between three gay men. "Carlos' table was set for three. It looked like a spread out of the glossy pages of House Beautiful, everything in its proper place. . .. An atmosphere of dim refine­ment pervaded the room as Carlos brought out the chilled beef madrilene for Matthew and John." Is this for real or is Lebonati lampoon· ing the lifestyle of gay men? Regardless of whether Lebonati has ever had a close friendship or if he is hav­ing problems writing serious fiction, I was insulted. Friendships are very important among gays. Our friends are often our families. Most of us maintain closer rela­tionships and share more with our friends than our flesh and blood. Tropic Lights expresses none of that. Instead, the relationship between John, Carlos, and Matthew, is reduced to nothing more than a reason to get out of the house. Lebonati's vivid descriptions of the Miami area provide the only saving grace to this book. In agreement with the pub­lisher's flyer, this book is "filled with rich imagery of lush tropical landscapes and thick blue nights." Most readers will prob­ably feel more warmth from the tropical breezes, than the relationship between the three "friends." Gerald Lebonati is a graphic artist who also writes for gay newspapers. Now that he has decided to enter the world of fiction, I hope that Tropic Lights won'tdarken his literary future forever. NOVEMBER 8. 1985 /MONTROSE VOICE 15 WE MAKE THE DIFFERENCE DRIVE THE CAR OF YOUR DREAMS FOR LESS!! Cash for Your Trade ... No Down Paymen t CADILLAC BMW TOYOTA '86 Sedan Deville .......... 278mo. '86 Fleetwood .......... 327mo. NISS/AN '85 3181 .. 269 mo . '85 325E . 339mo. OLDS '86 Cresida . ..... .... 259mo. '86 Celica 178mo. MER CEDES '86 98 R egemzy '86 Sentra 127mo. . ......... 278mo. '85 190E . 354mo. '86 300ZX 279mo. '86 Calais 184mo. '85 300 ... 480mo. ALSO NOW LEASING LATE MODEL USED CARS SAT'\ JACINT'O LEASING All Makes All Models Domestic Foreign 10700 Richmond, SuitelOO Houston, TX77042 a di1ision of SAI'X JACI~TO M OTORS =Since/926= CALL DEBBIE OR ROBBIE 781-CARS 13 CONTINUOUS HAPPY HOURS 7am-8pm PATIO BAR NOW OPEN STIFF DRINKS ICE COLD BEER HOT MEN New Sound-Live D.J.­Great Music D.J. MARDI COLEMAN ALWAYS:50¢ DRAFT BEER 611 Hyde Park 13. 4dam§~ Ltd. 528-9079 16 MONTROSE VOICE I NOVEMBER 8. 1985 er the dof The Montrose Voice If Montrose is part of your world too, you should be part of the Montrose Voice. TO SUBSCRIBE, OR TO ADVERTISE, CALL 529-8490 • -._,'_:__-,,---..­.. t ':-\~--- \ r NOVEMBER 8, 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 Why Corporate America May Be Hispanic-Americans' Best Friend By Irma Herrera Pacific &ws Seruice Special to the Montrose Voice "We'd like to teach the world to sing in perfect harmony," went a Coca-Cola ad in the late 60s. These days, the soft drink maker is one of a growing number of com­panies that speak to the country's fastest expanding market in its native tongue. Three years ago business spent $166 million on advertising aimed at Hispan­ics. By 1984 the amount had jumped to $228 million, according to Hispanic Busi­ness Magazine. As advertising executives like to say, it's the demographics that count: the number of Hipsanics in the United States is diffi­cult to peg because of a large undocu­mented segment, but estimates range between 16.5 million by the Bureau of Cen­sus up to 30 million by Coca Cola's own studies. Hispanics are increasing at six times the rate of whites. And it is a group with many shopping years ahead. The average Hispanic age is 22 versus 30 for other Americans. "Generally, there's a slow awakening in corporate America about Hispanics, but the sheer numbers forced people to take a second look," says Dan Nance of Hispa­nia, the branch created by J . Walter Thompson, one of the country's largest advertising agencies, to handle its His­panic marketing. Nance says his com­pany's research shows Hispanics "are brand loyal and brand conscious." They are also loyal to their first lan­guage. The vaet majority of Hispanics is either fluent in English or knows enough to"get by," reports the New York research firm of Yankelovich, Kelly and White, yet eight out of 10 ranked the Spanish lan­guage as the most important part of their culture they want to preserve. S~aking Spanish to those customers is simply good business, and showing sensi­tivity to their roots is even better, says Howell D. Boyd, vice president of Sosa and Associates, the San Antonio marketing firm that targeted Hispanics for President 'Generally, there's been a slow awaken­ing in corporate America about His­panics, but the sheer numbers forced people to take a second look' Ronald Reagan's 1984 re-election cam­paign. "American businesses must do more than just translate English ads into 'Walter Cronkite Spanish,"' Boyd says. "It's also extremely important not to be innocently racist. While ads should be sub­tly ethnicized, you don't want to just stick a sombrero on someone. You have to be respectful of the consumer's culture." Vehicles for Spanish-language advertis­ing are becoming more refined. With the expansion of Spanish International Net­work (SIN), has come better programming and more viewers. Now highly produced commercials for McDonald's, Polaroid, Eastern Airlines, Sears Roebuck, and Ban deodorant, to name but a few, air over SIN's 328 affiliates in Hispanic strongh­olds like Miami, Chicago, Los Angeles and San Antonio. They are also shown in le .. s likely places, such as Sheboygan, Wiscon­sin; Anchorage, Alaska, and Hammond, Indiana. Advertising is not the only way compan­ies are courting the hearts and minds of Hispanics Some raise their image in com-munities by participating in social pro­jects. Coke, for example, has a $10 million pro­gram to create business and civil partner­ships in Hispanic areas, according to Rich Amundsen, director of Hispanic Markets, Coca Cola, USA. The company also intends to spend $2 million on the school dropout problem. Anheuser-Busch supports the Mexican­American Legal Defense and Education Fund (MALDEF) and the League of United Latin American Citizens (LUI.AC), and sponsors numerous Hispanic community events throughout the country. The fact that Hispanics consume 20-25% more beer than whites is not lost on the brewer. Some note with irony that the spending power of Hispanics seems to be accomp­lishing what years of political organizing has yet to fully bring about. At a time when emotions run high over immigration policy and some would legislate against Spanish speaking by ruling English the "official" language of the United States, corporations are making efforts to deal with Hispanics on their own terms. 'One shouldn't feel threatened by a grow­ing Hispanic popula­tion or immigrants, because people who adopt this as their country are extremely nationalistic "American business is interested in sel­ling a roduct. They'll go to great lengths Feature to do thal By advertising in Spanish, a person's native laguage, you do more than just give information. It says 'We know and care about you," ' says Nicandro Jua­rez, president of a Los Angeles research and marketing firm. Amundsen of Coca Cola says among corporations today, "There is a realization that the face of America is changing. This is leading to growing segmentation and away from the mass-marketing approach. "In earlier days everybody was told there is only one way to be an American, you had to be like Robert Young of'Father Knows Best," ' Amundsen says, "Today you can retain your ethnic identity and find American companies that will reach out to you." One of those reaching especially far is Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. By the end of the year it expects to touch about 65% of the nation's Spanish­speakers with its multi-media message: "Metropolitan Responde Por Usted"­Metropolitan Really Stands By You. As Pierre Maurer, executive director of the company sees it, "American society today is a mosaic or a salad rather than a melting pot. One shouldn't feel threatened by a growing Hispanic population or immigrants, because people who adopt this as their country are extremely nation­alistic. Hispanics stand much more behind American products than other groups." This will not be the first time Metropoli­tan has spoken to America in something other than English. Maurer says, "We pro­duced materials in many different languages-Italian. German, Yiddish-at the tum of the century, when America was a nation of immigrants." And-after some decades of looking at all Americans as cast in one mold-"In many ways," Maurer adds, "it still is." Cash in on your Crabs Earn $50 and treat your pubic lice. Call 590-CRAB 18 MONTROSE VOICE I NOVEMBER 8. 1985 What Our New Elites Must Learn In College By Franz Schurmann Pac1f1c News &rL'1ce Sptt1a/ to the Montrose Voice School days are back-a time of year that once conjured up imagei; of children shuf· fling into classroomi; to rei;ume the weary trek towards adulthood Today, the images are more complex. There are kids hellbent on college from kindergartenon. At the other end of the specturm are the dropouts in the making. In between are the plodders, drifteri; and mavericks. Class lines are being drawn throughout the educational system as between the potential insider,; and all the rest. Getting m means eventually going to college. The di'gree gets you into a job network that carries you along from job to job for the rest of your life. Pay will be good. fringen will be provided. And you will have access to the good life as defined by mainstream middle-clai;s standard ... The dropouts will ripple out into the real world where they will hustle to trap some cash. The plodders will just plod through life at the lowest rungs of the economic ladder The drifters-and one can see more and more ex-middle-class drifters in the cities and rural are8b-will just drift And the mavericks will take nsks. as they always have. But "going to college~ has become a dream for mo,;t school children, even potential dropouts. Kids now know that college means accPss to the system. In ear· lier days. youngsters . eni;ed that even if you did not go to college, you could earn good wages in the factory, buy a house in the suburbs and attain a middle-class lifestyle. Now a job that enables you to do tha_t generally requires a college degree. Getting into college is like becoming an officer m thr arml'<I force~ One become.; a part of a privileged class clearly distin· gu1shed form the lesser ranks. If college grants this privilege to access to the good life, then what are college grad· uate" suppoNed to do for the system in return? What are they being educated for? In earlier days. our economic system was a vastiob structure marked by a fairly determinate division of labor. There were the simpler job:; that needed little more than basic education and on-the-job train­ing And there were the more complex jobs where higher training was needed. That was where college came in. But our economic system has rapidly changed these pa!<t decades. Jn fact, the chief change is that change itself has become the hallmark of the system. Never has the notion of a "set of skills" neces· sary for a job been less applicable. Job requirements keep on changing, and job holders have to learn and re-learn all the time. Flexibility, adaptability, and life­long learning are what the current job game requires. Giving students such capabilities is what a college education is uniquely sup· posed to do. Not elementary, high, special· ized or even post-graduate schools can do this. Only undergraduate college. What colleges cannot do is give students some encycloJl('dic reservoir of factual knowledge or train them in particular skills. As any ex-college student knows, the facts are promptly forgotten after exams And as to skills, they can only be taught through apprenticeship on the job. But what a college education should do is give students a triple capacity to think, write and problem-solve. Thinking 1s more than letting ideas flow through your brain. It is the capacity to write, mnovate by relating thinits into .f!Om~ new patterns thut conventional wis· The Houston Tennis Club and its HouTex Tournament Committee wishes to express its gratitude to the follow­ing major supporters whose contributions have made this year's tournament such a success: Risky Business, Fitness Exchange, Heaven (the bar), Heights Grennery & Flowers (Nancy Molleda), The Galleon, Acadian Baker. Celadon Hari, Gary Lee & Associates, Meridien Leasing, Inc. (Lee Borba), Montrose Voice, Physico Fitness Superstore, Richard W. Corder. C.P.A., S&E Design (Ken Sievers), Swilley-Hudson Realtors, This Week In Texas, Classic Wines & Spirits. Michaelyndons Hair Designs, Windsurfing Gale at Clear Lake, Branches, D&V Plumbing (Dale C. Harris), Donny Kelley, House of Coffee Beans, Lolli:Wellik:Design (Warren Wellik), State Farm Insurance (Don Brown), Action Lifestyles (Galleria), Appearances, Harry Gordon Jewelers, Mad Elegance. dom says do not go together. Thinking enable~ one to do thmgs in a creatively different way. Writing is more than stringing senten· ces together on a piece of paper. It is com· mumcative self.expre11sion. Others have to understand it so that both writer and reader can do things, together or singly, on the basis of what is communicated. Prohlem-Rolving 1s more than coming up with some clever algorithm to get from problem to solution. It involves figuring out what tht• problem is in the first place. That requries taking a messy, disturbing, or challenging situation and formulating it into a problem through which one can seek to find solutions. Flexibility, adaptability, life-long learn· ing are what a rapidly changing system needs. And the thinking, writing, problem·Rolving that a college education is suppofied to teach is what provides these. The elitism is there, no doubt about it. If colleges do the job they are 11upposed to, then the system can work. If not, all we shall have is a do-little class of privileged claimants. But with so many dropouts, plodders and drifters out there, there is a real danger that insider-outsider class lines will harden. It has happened too often in other times and other societies. When that happens, a tendency arises for colleges to become breeding groups for the privileged rather than the talented. A $12,000 REWARD awaits the person(s) whose information leads to the arrest and indictment of the individual(s) responsible for the murder of GREGORY D. CHAFIN on October 27, 1983 at The St. James Condominium Contact Sgts. Steve Garza or Larry Webber at the Houston Police Department Homicide TELIPHONE 222·3651 NOVEMBER 8, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 19 Dr. Didato's Personality Quiz How Trusting Are You? By Salvatore V. Didato, P h .D. News America Syndicate Special to the Montrose Voice Interpersonal trust is a necessity of society. Whether seeking a physician, lending money or forming a club, we must decide whether the risk of disappointment is worth the gain involved. But, like it or not, trust in others is a condition for our survival. Trust exists on many levels: On the material level, we trust someone to fix our watch or our radio; on the safety level, we trust that other cars won't run a red light or that our bus driver won't be drunk; and on the personal level, we trust someone with our love or with intimate disclosures about business or social affairs. All these situations involve risk. Trust is often situational; i.e., you might confide in a stranger at a church meeting more than you would in the same stranger at a cocktail lounge. According to Profes­sor Julian B. Rotter of the University of Connecticut and others who have researched it, trust appears to be a person­ality trait like honesty, dominance, etc. It persists and colors our perceptions of the world, no matter what our circumstances might be. Rotter and others have developed tests which distinguish high from low trusters and our quiz is similar to these. To find your "trust index," a nRwer the items True or False, thinking of people in general and not of specific individuals. I. When I receive a compliment from a casual acquaintance, my first reaction is to disbelieve it. 2. Most persons would break the law if TWO NAMES THAT MEAN COUNTRY Go Western Week, Nov. 10 thru 17 •Tuesday- Free C&W Dance Lessons • Wednesday- Rodeo Steak Nite on Patio 7:00 • Thursday- Kickoff the Rodeo Miss TGRA Contest- BAB 8:00 Proceeds to TGRA-Don't Miss This One! • Friday thru Sunday- The Brazos River Band-Live Enjoy "Houston's Country" without having to drive to the country. Come See The Remodeling in Progress' Expanding to SERVE YOU! they thought they wouldn't be caught. 3. People are basically hypocritical. 4. Most politicians do not take bribes. 5. Success is more a matter of what you know rather than who you know. 6. I usually dislike lending anything. 7. Regardless of media hype, people today are just as moral as they were 100 years ago. 8. Most people don't really face their shortcomings. 9. If you get too familiar with people, it will "breed contempt." 10. Most people would turn in a wallet, with, say, $100 in it. o Explanation Trusting others is a learned rei;ponse. Much of it depends on the nature of our early relationships . If parents and siblings were fair and consistent in deal­ing with us, if they fulfilled their promises, and if they were open and accepting of us, then we most likely will be trusting of oth­ers. Inevitably, though, our pristine confi­dence is shaken when we realize that our expectations of others are too unrealistic and, like every child, we go through a trust dilemma in which we must relinquish our naive perception of the world. Another side of interpersonal trust has to do with adult life experience.;. Suspi­cious types usually have been emotionally hurt and disappointed in human affairs a nd have learned to be cautious with oth­ers. On this basis, it might be more accu­rate to say that distrust, rather than trust, is a learned response, for an infant has no previous mental set to be wary of others, but the pain of repeated disappointment will generate the traits of caution and guardedness. Some interesting questions arise. Can people be taught to distrust? Nazi minister of propaganda, Josef Goebbels, once said, repeat a lie often enough and people will believe it. The psychology of propaganda is based on this notion and strong distrust between social groups can be achieved by such unrelenting slander. Are there gender differences in trust? Studies at Tufts University and elsewhere show that women tend to score higher on measure.; of generalized trust than men do. Are high trusters naive as a group? To some degree they are, concludes Rotter, but the majority of them are not simplistic in their thinking. Instead they tend to be no less intelligent or gullible than low trus­ters. Compared with their oppositei;, they tend to be happier, more likeable and more dependable. o Score Key: 1-F, 2-F,3-F,4·T, 5-T, 6-F, 7-T,8-F,9·F, 10-T. Give yourself one point for each cor­rect answer. 8·10 correct-You are a trusting person who accepts others as you see them. But be careful. You may also have to guard against the tendency to be somewhat gul­lible and naive. 5.7 correct-You have the balance between trust and caution. 0-4 correct-You are more guarded and suspicious than most of us. Have you had unhappy experiences which cause you to analyze other's motives too much? ·· ••. In the hea rt o f The City" $44 00 • FRH AIRPORT SHllTTll • COMPLIMENTARY CHAMPAGNE • WINE • ·COMPLIMENTARY CONTINENTAL IRUJCFAST (large single/double occupancyl • VAUT SERVICE • Special Weekly and Monthly Rates Reservott0ns required p1eose co11 Toll Free 800-253-5263 (Notoonot) 800-521-4523 (Cohf J (415)-441 -5141 (Son ~rO"ICISCO) 1315 POLK ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94109 Southwest Funeral Directors 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Servicing the Community 24 Hours Daily /Auto Repair/ r--;;;~~,--1 : Oil Change & 1 I LubeJob : I $24 95 PLUS TAX ,I ___Ex_p ir_es _11_/14_/ 85_ _ JI !Jll2%1 u 1901 Taft 528-1901 20 MONTROSE VOICE I NOVEMBER 8, 1985 Montrose Classified ANNOUNCEMENTS LEGAL NOTICES The Montrose V0tce. •general circulation newopaper havong pubilshed contonu· ously for 1 year or longer. is quahf1ed to accepl legal nohces attect1ng the news­papers c1rcu1at1on area of Montrose CARS & BIKES MERIDIEN LEASING Lee Borba 97~1985 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ASCOT LEASING, LTD. 1303 Upland. 973-0070 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE SAN JACINTO MOTOR LEASING 10700 Richmond 1100. 781-8566 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE COMMERCIAL SPACE MONTROSE-FAIRVIEW AT WAUGH ~~,: r2:1-i~merc11I 220 3 phase DWELLINGS, ROOMMATES, HOUSES/APTS. FOR SALE, RENT, LEASE Monti . large 1~1 . hardwood. off-street par~1ng m1n1-bhnds $325 Gordon ~core The House Store 524-3617 Manlrose. 2·2~ 1ownh0Use. very~ 10 h. ceilings. custom balhs. 2 slory atnum $800 monlh. The House Slore 524-3617 ForeciosedPrOperty Spec1a11s1- 1nvestors and 1nd1'liduats Many k>ca~ llOf\S 524-5730 Westwood Ma_ll_ __F_ o-reclo_s e- d Property $50.000 S 100 down payrnenl Easy quail· hcations 3-2-2 524-5730 Sharpslown-4-2·2. Foreclosed prop· erty 563.000. S 100 down payment. easy quat1flcat1ons. 1ow tow closing 524-5730 -- MONTROSE TOWNHOUSE Conlemporary decoratMs dream 3 slory townhouse 1n smaU unique complex with separate dining room. 1Jy1ng room with cathederal c"'ling and sl<yftght. 2 bed· rooms, 2'h baths, kitchen. utility room. 2 story atnum with sun deck {'¥'ery prrvate}. wet bllr 1n hv1ng room. 2 car attached gar­age. e•tra security features Convenient to downtown and freeways $139.500 Shown by appoonlrnent only Dee W1ll1· ams broker 491-5119 G•y ma1e needs non-smoking roommate near 290 an<l 610 680-8286 Br.tWIM lookrnQ for r_oom--m-a-te- lo_s_h_a-re-2 bdr apt Male or lemale Bills paod $260 522-6643 ATTRACTIVE FURNISHED EFFICIENCY 1n the Shepherd-SW Freeway area avaola­ble for qu1el. sludent lype No pets or children $255 bills paid Lease. depos11 1937 Lexongton Call 527-9131 to see FURNlsHED ONE BEDROOM in small complex 1n quieter part of Montrose Security system and parking Adults $285 plus bills 509 Wasl Mam Call 527- 9131 to see BAYLAND HEIGHTS Large duplex apt , central heaUa1r, mod­ern kitchen. dishwasher. disposer. stO'f'e, ref. electric tock security. fenced yard. pets considered Call Jerry after 5 50 pm Tel 643--0666 A·l ROOMMATE SERVICE For your ideal roommate. call 932-1363 Established in 1979 H°;!jhlS. garage apt 2· 1 hardwood. c.;;i: 1ng fans. laundry room. $360 plus b~ls Nice area Judy 524-3617, 880-2230 HEIGHTS BY OWNER - Cheerful. 2·1, Sunroom. laundry room Shady fronl porch Big fenced yard Assume 10 35' 60's 880-9772 Please leave message Mon1rose townhouse. ~tory 8~ down, owner f1nallCed Judy The House Slore 524-3617 2007Brun-:-1 bedroom a~ludy and 2 bedroom 1p1S now leasing 1 month FREE rent L1m1ted offer New security and new sw1mmu"lg pool. Newly redone complex Onty a few units 1ett 0on·1 miss your chance 861-5556 SEEKING RESPONSIBU-- ROOMMIAA TE GWM 2~35. very clean non-smol<er. rel· 1ab4e. friendly attractive. appreciative, preferably into heme proj8Cts employed For large 2 bedroom apt landscaped. fenced yard. deck. hOt tub. converuent to downtown. Monlroee S 175 mo plus bills Call Robert 520-1180 VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Rent that house or apartment through a Montrose Voice Clasa1fied Call 5~8490 ~~~~~rub'' ~.r~:~~~~.::.ce::d or Visa EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED Hairdressers with following Montrose­/ Greenway Plaza Negotiate your salary 5~9511 PRODUCTION DIRECTOR The Montrose Voice seeks a take-charge, talenled, experienced producllon direc­tor to produce the Vo1ca and olher weekly pubhe11hons •nd 1n assortment of inde­pendent 1ypesett1ng JObs I need someone who 1s good and fasl-and has a good eye for producing pleaS1ng layoulS Expe­rienced only Should also be able profes· S10nalty attractive so you can meet clients Ab1lily to help solicit independent =~nkl.~90.aforb~,'::me:;:enry PERFORMING ARTS Ticket ott1ce personnel sought fulVpart tome Excallent verbal skills required Base plus commission Call Ms Knopp altar 11 a m 52&-5323 (MISC.) FOR SALE FOR YARD SALES See ads under '"Yard Sales·· at the end of the Montrose Classified MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS YES, YOU TOO Can have a massage by 8111 o·Rourke' es&-2298' on. lhe 1ri11 of ,, all MASTER li'ASSEUR At your service by 1pp01ntment New chents welcomed Call Randolf al (713) 52&-3147 Thanks Cadillac of Massage Magoc To~ ET (713) 622-4530 MUSC'UliiiMASSEUR EUROPEAN FULL-BODIED TREATMENT Penetrating professional deep muscle massage In or oul, day and evening appointments available CHASE 880- 4500 THE GOLDEN TOUCH Prov1d1ng the discrete ind1v1dual a very relaxong massage and a hell of a good tune Champagne and talk are well appre­c1aled Why nol call and al least talk Ask for Peler 524-6337 PERSONALS Attractove. GWF- 32. Sens1love~ mature. sincere •bout retat1onsh1ps, seeks same Reply Blind Box 262-C c/o V0tce ~ GBM. 32. sincere. loving. romantic type Interested 1n meeting GWM, 32 plus. for lriendsh1p or possible relatoonshop Reply to Blind Box 263-M c/o Vo1ca TiieCoUPLES organization provides social/ educat1on•I outreach tor Lovers COUPLES promote pos111ve aspects of relat1onsh1ps and thetr stability 1n our communily For informa11on Box 9773 Houston 77213-0773 (Include phone) G/WIM. 47, tall. good looking, profes· sional. wants to share good tunes with younger men Box 1230, 1713 Weslheo­mer. Houston. TX 77098 GWM would like 10 meet new friends on 1960 area 537-9193 SEEKING LIFETIME PARTNER Looking for a m•n that will return sens1t1Y· 11y and caring I am a GWM. 32. 5·9• brown/green. 150. lhat knows good sex 1s 1mportanl. but not everything I have to admit I have a prochv11y towards slightly younger men. but everything 1s nego11a· ble Looking for someone interesled 1n hie beyond the bars Someone to marry­Someone to share Christmas as with my family-A person not afraid of the total commitment and intenS1ty that comes with a monogamous relat1onsh1p Surely there has to be some romantics left oul there who enioy lhe arts and doing things they haven"t done before P 0 Box 56606. dept 558. Houston, Texas 77256 SEEKING RELATIONSHIP G/W/M. 40, very tall. medium build, h11ry body, black hair (receding). mouslache. non-smoker, interested In meeting a rela­tionship oriented G/W/M EnJoy home Ille. photography. outdoor act1V1hes You are a professional, mature. honest. health conscious. independent person. 2~0. shm, smooth, non-smoker, non-doper. not into bars, with s1m1lar interests If the mind IS more important than lhe body and you want to develop a lasting relationship slowly. naturally and w1thou1 pr .. ure, let me hear from you Peter A . P 0 Box 70972 Houston. Texas 77270-0972. Gay wrestling• Uncansored infop1xp1x $3.00 NYWC. 59 Wasl 10th. NYC 10011 MUSCULAR TEDDY BEAR Wanted. over 40. professional. stable, GWM, for sharing home. monogamous ~Tb~1~~~~h~-t~~~ 1~~~~~gufi(0~~~ eyes, blond German. 1rt/muS1c lover. Send descriptive letter & pholo to Blind Box 263-Z c/o Voice ---SEEKS AND FIND Attracllve GBM. 152, 5'11 "'. 27 seeks same GM any race. 24-34. for possible relat1onsh1p I am sexually versatile bul not into pain or kinks En1oy quiet times. travel. !heater. movies & reading PLEASE no druggies. smokers. alcohohcs. fems. fals or bar bunnies Any reply musl be sincere. honest. & monogamously· ~:~~t'111s~:~;,:x ::~~~r~ur ~:~~Yi~! 263-A c/o Voice Hairy Me_n_/H11-rf-an_s_A~dhst tnf0$2"Ci0: Hair, 59 Wesl tO-th.- NY-C -10011 HANDYMAN WANTED to do landscaping. yardwork in exchange for housing, companionship. 579-0202 OUR POLiCVOnsexually-Expllc:.t Adver· ttsing The Montrose Voice does not believe that human beings engaging in sexual acts with one another 1s immoral. It 1s abnormal. in fact. for a person not to engage 1n sexual act1v1ty Therefore, our readers are encouraged to acWerttee here to seek rela11onsh1ps, encounlers, adven­tures, etc All advertising should. how· ever. nol contain language that would offend an unsu!ipect1ng reader A CLASmD AFFAIR? __ _ John Preston and Frederick Brandt can show you how to have active fun or play passive games with the personal ads In theu new book. •·c1ass1foed Affairs." they'll tell you how to write an ad that really slands out. what to expect when you place or respond lo an ad, and even what all those funny litlle 1bbrev1at1ons mean. Send $8 lo "Class1f1edAffa1rs," Aly· son Pub . Dept P-5, 40 Plympton. St . Bos Ion. MA 02118 (Also included will be a coupon for $5 ott on your nexl Personals in your choice of 25 gay pubhcat1ons. including the Montrose Voice ) YARD & GARAGE SALES Garage Sale 921 Peden Sal.-Sun !HOth o;;;&;ay Sale Saturday and Sunday• Nov 9-10. 405 Welch Furniture. appllan· ces. art obiects and more Garage Sale. 1901 Tah. P1ston·s Up 101. Sal -Sun Nov. 9-10. 10ern-4pm ~Sun 4700 Gibson at 500 She­pherd Antiques. mil. uniforms, furniture, gifts and goodies of six queens PAID ADVERTISEMENT HOUSEBOY/STUDENT I have, so far, been unsuccessful in my search for an eigh· teen or nineteen your old male whom I can serve as a surro­gate uncle and who can serve me as a Houseboy/Student. Many young people have responded to my previous ad, but most of them have been either older than twenty years of age, taller than 5'9", or heavier than 130 lbs. But I still believe that there must be one or two eighteen or nineteen year old gay males who very much need my assist· ance, e.g., subsidizing his college or art school education, giving him emotional support, affording him the pleasure of serving an older man, and, possibly most importantly, pressuring him to foreswear and abnegate the non­productive activities and ways of life of the gay world. This change in lifestyle would mean no longer being able to hang out et gay bars, no longer party till 3:00 AM, no longer smoke joints or cigarettes. Instead, he would learn that he is a member of a minority group interspersed within the straight, majority populace. Consequently, he must, while st ill very young, educate himself even better than his straight peers so that, in the future, he can be prepared to successfully com­pete and succeed in the straights' world. No, I do not promise you a vacation or picnic. Four years of living with me won't be easy. But I do guarantee you that, at the conclusion of those four years, you will be ready to con­tinue your post-graduate education or begin your career as well-trained as anyone. I also guarantee you that you will have acquired a value system quite different than that which is, unfortunately, held by the majority of young men I, as well, guarantee the successful graduate the security of knowing his home life will be stable and you will have the pleasure of knowing that a 49 year old, professional, man (6'1 ", 165 lbs. very straight and youthful appearing, bearded, very hairy) cares for you, loves you, and needs you. Needs you very much! I have earned a lot in this world. And yet feel an aching void which can only be filled by my emotionally adopting a nephew. Yes, I am into games of bondage. Yes, I would, very much, enjoy restraining you and engaging in bondage and discipline games with you. But be assured, you will never be hurt by me. For whatever reasons, my physical attraction to males 1s limited to youths of eighteen-twenty two years of age (who appear younger, who are 5'9" or shorter, 130 lbs. or lighter, who have wavy hair (or are prepared to have 1t permed), who have a beardless. boyish face, and smooth, hairless (or nearly hairless), boyish body. These are absolute require­ments; requirements which will have to be proved by your supplying photos and copies of proof of age. If you do fit these requirements. please call me collect. (Or if you do not fit these requirements, but know someone who does and who may not see this ad, please bring this ad to his attention) If you do not fit these requirements (age, height, weight and appearance), please show respect for yourself and respect for the sincerity of my search and not waste your and my time by responding in a vain attempt to picture yourself as some­one you are not. My telephone number (914) 428--3991, collect. Hours to call: New York EST Time; Weekdays: 8 PM-9:30 PM; Weekends· 9 AM-6 PM Telephone calls outside of these hours will not be ac­cepted Thank you. Good luck. I very much want to help the right person(s). ,,........ .....__--__, HONESTL'< I 1HE NERVE OF 50M( P[CJ>l[ I P6 Ir \'D JU~ GIVE. A'v.J/'H THE SEC.RET TECHNIQUE I 5P£NT 'r'E.AAS PE:RFECTING. I V.7. NOVEMBER 8. 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 21 On the Town }·~ ACCOMMODATIONS (for Visitors to Houston) ~OV WORK HARD All DA'{.. . . .. SLF\MM[RJN', HAMMER IN' - .MID wt'EN THAT SPECIAL MOMENT CMS, t(OlJ HAVE. \HE 'WARM 5AT15Ff\CT\()-l OF Kl\Oi.JI~ YOU EA~ED ..'< OU Rt.LAX, SIT BACK, AND SLAM OOJN A rrw COOL. REFRESHING WOOD Houston Guest House 106 A ... oodale-523- 2218 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Eag;;c;;;ti;;;;=-;()4 Avondale- 520-9767 GAY BARS S.cchua-523 Lovett-523--3396 lesbian Blim--710 P1c1f1c 528-9427CO"unlry Bayou~~ WMihe1mer-::Si6-1s19 - Brazos River Bottom 2400Br&zos- 528-9192 country SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Edd1ngton'1 6121 H1llcroft -981·6121 ~ 1 Betl-i"s&.o..53-eounl~ Gar1eon -2303 Aichmond -522·7616 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Heaven Pacific 11 Grant 521~9123 disco SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE H01e 109 Tuam 52&:9128 Hooters-2212 Converse 5'21·2310 .rRi-eos Pac1t1c -521-2519' -­SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Just M•~.;nn·a-817 fa1,;;"e;::::6"~ IUbian K;Nifed ~ 4902 R~ 623--6135 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Montroae Mining Co- 805 P1c1hc-529-74M' SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Mother Lode Cale & Saloon- 8°' paC;"flc .,._ s23- 0511 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE N;,;;be';s 2-300 Westheimer-526-6551---;;u R1Ch'1~4Q;S;n J8cJnto--650-0769 d1sc­o Ri'PCOrd11-s. fairview-521-2792 iuthet R11ky Bui'i'M11 2700 A1barlY ~52a-361t cabaret Si~'~" wMthe1m.;::s21-ii:M1 521· 9030 The 8""11-611 Hyde- Park-528-9079 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ~Ins 20$3Wirt'Ad -827·1113 --~ SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Vertture-N .. 2923 M.tln-522..()()()() SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE PRIVATE GAY CLUBS Club Houston Body Cenlre 2105 Fenntn-659- 4998 FrenCh~rter Theaier--3201 LOO.a~ 0782 M1dlowne Spi-3100 F;;;nl~ P1gasu1 ~ 1314 Roaahe 524-PIGS VACATIONS VISITING SAN FRANCISCO? DOLORES ST BED & BREAKFAST 415-861-5887 OR WRITE MARC 381 DOLORES ST, SF, FOR INFO For Houston tra'lel agents. see .. Travel Agenls" 1n the Greater Monlrose Busi­ness Directory, next page NEW ORLEANS GUEST HOUSE- 1118 Ursuhnes. (504) 566-1177 See our .display ad monthly in the Mo~trose Voice SAN FRANCISCO: LELAND HOTEL- 1315 Polk. 1-800-253-5263 or (415) 441- 5141 See our display ad monthly 1n the Montrose Voice To place an AD in the t-lontr~cise Vc.J ice Ju:::: t phone us ! S29-8-l9(1 Hlam-S:JOpm I> al days Ads can be charged over the phone to a major credit card OR we can bill you tater. An estimated 27,ooo· people read the Montrose Voice every Friday. Put YOUR message before the largest single audience in Montrose and Houston's gay com­munity 'Est1ma1ed readership based on a 2 8 pass .. on rate factor DINING OUT IN MONTROSE RESTAURANTS lliRESTAURANTS LISTED HERE' SERVE AS DISTRIBUTION POINTS FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE GRllPPLIN'. SCRAPPLIN'-GOlt-0 AFTER iHAT SP£CIAL &USTO '1'0!J CALL "LIVING'.' .. IT'. n GRJBS ... 7 Day Montrose Events Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat NOV NOV 8 9 NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV 10 11 12 13 14 Criteria for inclusion 1n 7·Day Calendar 1nd Montrose Resources 1 Event or grouo must speclhcally pertain to ne.ghbortiood of Montrose°' Hou1ton·1 gay cornrnun1ty unlesa major city. statt>or nauonal holiday or maJOr nt1t1onal gay event 2 Stnctly comrnerc1al events not Included. 3 But1neu. dvk: Ind IOCial groups and their events are generally qualif*f <4 Pohtical e¥ents .. t-iere onty one view ot • aub1eet. C81'ldtdate or party 11 dominant not qua11!19d For additional tnformation or phone oomberl. look tor the aponsonng Of"Oll\1zati0n under RetOUrces" Typestyles indicate events' location Events in Houston, Events of Local Interest Elsewhere. Events of Area Interest SELECTED EVENTS • MONDAY: Frontrunners run THROUGH 7 DAYS from Golf Center, Hermann Park • FRIDAY: "Breakthrough" lesbian-feminist program, KPFT, FM-90, 8:1S.llam • FRIDAY: Montrose Country Cloggers meet 7pm, MCCR, 1919 Decatur llSATUROAY-MONDAY; Houston Tennis Assn. "Hou-Tex V ' Nov. 9-11 • SATURDAY: KS/AIDS Foundation meets 3400 Montrose, no. 5()1, llam • SATURDAY: Houston North Professionals meets 7:30pm, Nov.9 II.SUNDAY: Houston Tennis Club plays 9am-noon, MacGregor Park • SUNDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center • SUNDAY: Women's bowling league plays, 3pm, Stadium Bowl • SUNDAY: Gay Asians & Friends meet 3pm Nov 10 • SUNDAY: W.W.B. Bowling ' League, 7:30pm, Post Oak Lanes • SUNDAY: Overeaters Anonymous meet 8pm Montrose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett •MONDAY: Veteran's Day, Nov.11 llSTARTING THURSDAY: Texas Gay Rodeo, Houston, Nov. 1~17. wfth judging Mr. a Ms. Rodea Nov. 1" • MONDAY: Integnty meets 7:30pm Nov 11, Autry House, 6265 Main • MONDAY: Montrose Art Alliance meets Nov. 11 •MONDAY: KR AIDS Foundation & Montro e Counseling Center AIDS Risk Reduction (Safe Sex) Workshops, 8pm Nov 11 • MONDAY: MSA Bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braeernain llTUESDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center llTUESDAY: MSA "Fun Volleyball League" plays, 7pm llTUESDAY: Montro!<e Symphonic Band meets Dignity Center, 3217 Fannin, 7:30pm llTUESDAY: Lutheran' Concerned meets Nov.12. Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh llTUESDA Y: Citizens for Human Equality meets 7:30pm Nov. 12. Houston House, 1617 Fannin, 9th floor llTUESDA Y: Houston Data Professionals meets 7:30pm Nov.12 · • WEDNESDAY: Houston Tennis Club plays 7:30pm, Homer Ford Tennis Center laJaiCienM-1308 Montrote-62-'-8876 ~IMOUll Street Caf&-1117 M aoun-529--126' Mf~iei=~ S SMphetd-524-3'51 Mottief' t..Ode C•te & Sal~ Pee hc-523-- 0511 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Netr•J tnd1eO A811•urani-2CM7 Marshall 526-­-' 113 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Second Verae-3619 WaShlngton-882·8773 $Pamah F'°wer:.:.3921 Main-86~1706 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Tim·a -cottM ShoP-1525 WestM met -5& 12911 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE W1111;.;-eeo ~thetmer at MOn~ ~11 • WEDNESDAY: r-;eartown Business Alliance meets 7pm Nov 13. Liberty Bank. 1001 Westhcimer • WEDr-;ESDAY: MSA Pool League competition • WEDr-;ESDAY: Overeaters Anonymous meet 8pm Bering Church, 1440 Harold llTHURSDAY· Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center llTHURSDAY: ''Wilde 'n Stein" gay radio show 7:J0.9pm on KPFI' Radio, FM-90 llTHURSDAY: Avondale Allsocia ti on meets 7 :80pm Nov.14, Christian Women's Center, 310 Pacific llTHURSDA Y: Mixed Bowling League, 9pm, Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain SELECTED EVENTS IN FUTURE WEEKS • IN 1 WEE!( Baytown Lambda '"'""'s 7 30pm Nov 15 • IN l WEEK: Choices meeta lpm Nov. 17, Mas!A'l'BClll YWCA, 3616 '\\'ilba • IN l '\\'EEK. Parente FIAG meet& 2pm. Nov 17, Presbyt.enan Center, 41 Oakdale • IN I WEEK: Gay Political Caucus m ... te 3217 Fannin, 7:30pm !\o,· 2ll • IN 2 WEEK:-; Houston Area Gay & Leabian En1rmeer1 & ScienW.te meet 7pm !\ov.26 • IN 2 WEEKS: Montrose Civfc Club (Neartown) meete 7pm Nov. 26, 1413 Weetheimer • IN 2 WEEKS Greater Montrose Buaineu Guild meeta 7pm !\ov.27, Bttnnan'• Realaurant, 3300 Smith • IN 2 WEE1CS Thcl'llclglYlng, Nov 28 • I?\ 2 WEEK::; Turko'· Trot Fun Run, !\ov_ 28 • IN 4 WEEKS Houston Gav Health Advocates med 7;30pm Doc: '7 • IN 6 WEEKS Jinirle Bell Fun Run, Dec.15 • IN 6 WEEKS Chris1mca, Dec 25 • IN 7 WEEKS N- Year'• he. Dec. 31 • IN AIOUT 22 WEBCS: 11 lh onnuOI SOuthealtem eom.rence lot le&biaN and Gay Men, lpflng 1986. N­Ori. ans •IN 33 WEEKS 17111 anniversary ol st~oll Rloll, N-York. June 28 •IN 39 WEEKS. Goy GQ,,,. II, "Trlump "' '86." Aug 9-17. 1986. Son Froncllco •IN 40 WEEKS 4111 anniversary ol - ol Nling ogotnst T•OI" ·~ol c:onducl low." Aug 17, 1982 • l!\ 14 WEEKS. Howiton u ... eetoclr: !'how & Rodeo. Aatrodome complex. Feb. JS.Mar 2 • IN 42 WEEK." 150th birthday of Citv of Howiton, Aug. SO • IN 87 WEEKS Unlvenol Feilowshlp ol MelTopolKan Community Churct.. • Dignity lntemallonol almulloneoul lntemotlonol cont.enc:es July 19-26. 1987, MiomV R Lauderdale 22 MONTROSE VOICE I NOVEMBER 8. 1985 Greater Montrose Service and Shopping Directory To advertise 1n this page coll 529-8490 dunng business hours ADULT VIDEO WE DELIVER VIDEOS Your gay video service 1420Westhe1mer 522-4485 ADVERTISING PROVIDING A SERVICE? Keep it hsted here 1n the Montrose Voice where literally thousands turn each wee)(. - VOICE ADVERTISING wciiiis­Advert1se your professional service through a Voice Class1f1ed Call 5~8490 Pay by check or charge rt on your Ameri­can Express, D1ne~s Club. MasterCard. Visa or carte Blanche AUTO SALES LEASING MERIDIEN LEASING __ _ Lee Borba, 97$-1985 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE - - ASCOTLEASING. LTD. 1303 Upland, 973-0070 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE SAN JACINTO MOTOR LEASING 10700 Richmond •100, 781-8566 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Also see "Cars & Bikes" on "Montrose Classified· page AUTO REPAIR Montrose Auto Repair Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed Ma1or1Minor Repairs Ga~ nr D•<>sel [ · , Repair 526-3723 21 •:;Fairview Gay Owned & Operated ALL'PAINT 'liOi>YSHOP 1510 Leeland, 65~3131 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE TAFT AUTOMOTIVE 1411 T1l1. 522-2190 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD -IN -TH-E MONTROSE VOICE -P-IS-TO~NS UP 1901 Tall 528-1901 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE AUTO RE'>AIR & BODY S~ 2001 Harold. 522-5255. 52&-1940 CLEANING JANITORIAL SERVICE Plus· 52&-6245 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD JN THE MONTROSE VOICE Becks Cleaning Specializing in Bars Professional Service We Care How You Look 528-9427 IS.m-11•m) COMPUTER RELATED COLUMBIA RIBBONS & SUPPLIES 8939 Bunny Run 999-0947 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE l!mllmm- Ronald M. Butler D.D.S. 427 Westhetmer Houston, TX 77ClYJ Monday thru Saturda~ Hours by Appc.mtment (713) 524.()538 !nlh'i!MllM - ~STIC SERVICE_ __ Dady maids, party helpers. and all domes· tic services provided In business since 1981 932·1363 FUNERAL DIRECTORS SOUTHWEST FUNERALDiiiECTORS 1218 Welch, 52&-3851 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GYMS FITNESS EXCHANGE 2900 Richmond. 524-9932 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE HAIR LOSS SERVICES MPB CLINIC 5401 Dashwood #1D.
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