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Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982
File 022
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Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982 - File 022. 1982-05-14. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 30, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/945/show/937.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-05-14). Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982 - File 022. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/945/show/937

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982 - File 022, 1982-05-14, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 30, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/945/show/937.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date May 14, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 022
Transcript Letters & Comments May 14.1982 / Montrose Voice 21 Time again for the annual Montrose mugging season From Ray Hill Houston Human Rights League They're at it again. They really never stopped, they've just had other things to do and haven't been as visible as they were last summer. But you can see and hear them any night of the week, more frequently on weekends. Partick and I walk the strip from Tin Tin and the French Quarter to Mary's or Tim's. We see their fat, hate-twisted faces and their streched, red necks as they holler and yell "fags," "Bick queers" or some other such expletives out ofthe windows of their parents cars. I'm talking about the invasion of white punks on dope from Memorial, Pasadena and Bellaire/Westbury. Taken one at a time, they are not dangerous. Actually they come alone in search of someone to meBS around with. (They are rarely successful in that search because lower Westheimer has more kids than those looking for kids.) The most mixed couples will do is yell, bum a tankfull of gas, and go home near the curfew set by their parents. But a carload of males drinking, or using other violence-prone drugs, are dangerous. They range in age from old enough to get out at night to grown up enough to develop their own sexual security. (Some men, like KKKers, Nazi party types and religious fanatics, never grow up that much.) Most are white. Some are Mexican. A few are Black. None are hustlers (to dispell a popular myth). Most will grow up to be white collar workers like their fathers. Many will be cops like their fathers. Some will be gay. But during that awkward period of their lives before they develop sexual maturity they are sexually frustrated enough to focus their rage on us. They are products of the religious and social condemnation of gay people in America homes, worksites and churches. Their fear of us festers in public and private schools where administrations refuse to discuss sexuality (ours or theirs) because some parents fear their children will grow up without the sexual frustrations and fears that has caused most of the anxiety in their lives. They have learned about violence from their parents, television/movies, and the atmosphere in the schools. They think that violence used against queers is alright because even the police do it and get away with it. While I have seen police officers stop carloads of potential queer harassers and advise them to leave Montrose in the best interest of all concerned, I have also seen cops encourage their civilian equivilants with supportive smiles and waves after hearing hate-filled expletives. In reality, the police are not much help when violence actually occurs. They are reportedly understaffed (although in Montrose when they aren't swaping stories at the Baby Giant, four cars at a time, they are chasing turners off of Avondale, with none where violence usually happens). Neartown's foot patrol is much more effective at controling violence than any on duty effort, and they are nice people. But there are too few of them. I believe the Guardian Angles are an effective deterant when on patrol and Montrose Patrol has proven its effectiveness, when active, for the last several yearB. None of the above replaces the common sense of potential victims. Never go alone into dark or isolated areas. Avoid the alleys and other such areas where assailants can lurk out of view until victims stroll into a trap. Know the people you leave the bar with or at least introduce them to friends in the bar before you leave, so that the handsome stranger knows there is someone that can identify him if he has anything in mind other then your pleasant company. Avoid getting drunk or strung out on any drugs; you cannot protect yourself if you are not alert. Be aware ofthe problems and advise your friends to be careful. Remember the make, model and color of cars full of suspected queer bashers and write down their license numbers. Report this information to the officers on foot patrol or Montrose Patrol. And of course be interested in other people's safety and don't just walk by someone who may be in danger. Montrose Patrol needs to be reorganized for the anticipated summer invasion. This will be my first summer as a Montrose resident so I can offer more support and I encourage others living in the area to help get the patrol up to effective levels of participation. Watch for announcements of meetings and training sessions. Several lives are lost when the patrol is not active and visible in the community. Reader supports GVO From J.A. Stahl I extend my whole hearted approval to Gary Van Ooteghem's stance in testifying in the "pom flickB" case, as Mr. Ray Hill chose to call it. Mr. Hill seems to think that no one except himself is entitled to an opinion without being called names. I do not know Mr. Van Ooteghem personally but his record speaks for him. He stood his ground against the county and now keeping in those lines he has followed the dictates of his own conscience instead of mindlessly following the whims of the gay political/social structure—a structure all to often led on tangents by some of our glory seeking leaders. It's a breath of fresh air to see someone stand up for what he as an individual believes, regardless of repercussions from other "leaders" in the Houston gay community. Gary, it is better to be called a prostitute than to be a rapist. Song banned in Britian International Gay News Agency LONDON—A song by singer Pete Shelley has been withdrawn from daytime play on the BBC because its lyrics are considered too homosexual. "Homosapiens," the song, is a hit as a bouncy, synthesized, dance-oriented rock number, but the lines about "homo- superior/in my interior" drew the censorship. As might be expected, the withdrawal made the song even more of a hit, drawing out the British press hungry for scandal. Reporters wanted to know if Shelley was trying to be a gay activist. He replied that he has been openly bisexual for some time. To step out ofthe closed now, he said, would be to step into a long corridor with everyone else. "What does that amount to? I didn't think it would be such an issue." Shelley believes "Homosapiens" to be in line with earlier lyrics of his songs, about the difficulty of human communication in a technological world. "It feels good to me to know that you're a homosapien too," sings Shelley, suggesting that the singer is pleased to meet another h uman being in this machine age. Happy Hour 7am-7pm Open Everyday at 7am Grant at Jackson 528-8234
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