Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982
File 019
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982 - File 019. 1982-05-14. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/945/show/934.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-05-14). Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982 - File 019. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/945/show/934

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982 - File 019, 1982-05-14, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/945/show/934.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date May 14, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 019
Transcript 18 Montrose Voice / may i4,1982 Heritage Lucius Beebe: for 30 years, the latest word By Patrick Franklin '1982 Stonewall Features Syndicate "Luscious Lucius," Walter Winchell called him, with more than a trace of envy beneath the spite. For 30 years, three of America's tackiest decades, Lucius Beebe's column was read as the latest word on what was good and what was bad, what was smart and what was not in cafe society, a term Beebe may have coined himself. Winchell had street savvy, but Lucius had Style. By the time he was 19, he had been kicked out of six prestigious prep schools and both Harvard and Yale. He was also listed in Who s Who, one of the youngest ever to make that list on his own crook. "Nothing matters but the gallant gesture," he was fond of saying; but when Lucius Beebe. standing six-foot-four and weighing 180, made any kind of gesture, it was bound to be more than gallant. "Flamboyant" might better describe what he did. As a cub reporter for the New York Herald Tribune, he once covered a fire clothed in immaculate morning coat, pearl spats and striped trousers. Asked why, he responded, "It was a daytime fire, too early for white tie." For a generation concerned with civil rights, atomic disaster and Reagan reac- tionism, his concerns seem rather ephemeral. Proper clothes, gracious dining and a distaste for most of the 20th century are hardly the stuff the Gay Liberation Movement is made of. But Beebe fulfilled one vital function during the years around the Second World War. He was visible. And for those who took the time to think about it, he was visibly gay. "Gay and proud" was an unknown con cept. The phrase for Lucius was more "gay and unashamed." Like Stein and Toklas, Beebe and his friend, Charles Clegg, were a constant pair. The press referred to Clegg as his "partner," a term that has delicate overtones. They loved to publish pictures ofthe two of them flanking their dog, elegantly named Mr. T-Bone Towser. Mr. T-Bone was actually a succession of St. Bernards, a breed Beebe chose because "once my visitors see his bloodshot eyes, they scarcely notice mine." Clegg and Beebe met in the atmosphere of high romance that both cultivated. It was at a party given by the wealthy Evalyn Walsh McLean, and Clegg could hardly miss the giant man in immaculate dinner dress wearing McLean's most famous possession, the Hope Diamond. Much to the dismay of security guards, Lucius had borrowed it for the evening. The gem's dread curse fell on them that night when they went to bed and Beebe's post-coital cigarette dropped to the floor setting the house on fire. The romance was, literally, off to a blazing start. For all of Beebe's elegance, Clegg was barely housebroken. Charles was given to occasional dalliance with both sexes, which infuriated Lucius. In the midst of one melodramatic scene, played with a supporting cast of onlookers, Beebe threatened to "lock him in the closet, where he belongs." But they hung together for decades, finding a community of interest and work. Clegg was no slouch at writing, either, and a fairly skilled photographer. Together they turned out 20 books. The subject matter of those publications was somewhat surprising. Both men shared an interest in the Old West, mining and railroading, and their writing shows a great deal of research in those fields. Beebe's interest in eleganc sparked his fascination with the stories of paupers who came west, struck it rich, and abandoned their Levis for diamond studs within weeks. Severe in his criticism of modern mores, he was gentler with his tales of sudden wealth and extravagance on the frontier. In 1950, he and Clegg bought The Territorial Enterprise, a dying newspaper in Virginia City, Nevada, and made Virginia City's decaying grandeur a first-line tourist attraction. They also indulged their love of railroading by purchasing and using one of the last privately owned Pullman cars in the United States: the aptly named "Virginia City." It was a Venetian Baroque palace on wheels, complete with fireplace, velvet portieres and wine cellar. Beebe refused to fly, and the railroad car allowed him to travel to his favorite watering spots in a style he felt was fitting. With typical hubris, he had written his own obituary for the Herald Tribune before he left New York, and that journal dutifully printed all of it, including his words "... it was a point of pride that he had never filed a story from outside continental America. His distaste for things foreign was pronounced." A good line, but one that forgot his preference for Russian caviar and French Bordeaux. He called the New York Times "dreary and pedestrian," but its obit caught his spirit more surely. When he died at the age of 64, the Times said, "Since he was capable of practically anything, no story can be dismissed summarily on the mere grounds pr probability." Beebe's thrust was for quality above all else. No matter what the source, its age, race or sexuality, it was the end result that counted. "Luscious Lucius" taught the lesson of the importance of the individual. Pot farmers peril park visitors Congressional investigators say the most dangerous creatures in America's national forests aren't bears or wolves. They're humans, specifically, survival- ists, timber thieves, squatters and marijuana growers, reports the Washington Post. A report from the General Accounting Office says paramilitary groups in California and Oregon are using national forests for weapons training, thieves are stealing millions of dollars worth of timber from western forests, and hundreds of squatters are illegally homes- teading on public land. According to the GAO, some of those squatters, especially in California, are also growing marijuana. With park patrols decimated by severe budget cuts, the GAO says, "It's only a matter of time" before a forest visitor is seriously injured, or possibly killed, after accidentally stumbling onto an illegal marijuana plantation. _4> nuvv unseal m m Happy Trails X X «___EMBERSHIP CLUB Friday Night, 9:30-1:30 Houston's most exciting new group BOB WILLIAMS & THE TRAIL RIDERS Saturday Fight, 9pm-midnight, & Sunday evening 6-9pm, to wrap up the weekend Bourbon Street comes alive on Fairview, featuring, by popular demand, the fantastic DIXIE KINGS 715 FAIRVIEW OPEN Noon-2am 7 days a week 521-2792 i _1 OPEN NIGHTLY, WEDNESDAY THROUGH SUNDAY LOCKERS SHOWERS PRIVATE ROOMS TUESDAY: Buck Night ($1 admission) THURSDAY: Gym Night {$1 with gym card or T-shirt) SUNDAY: Buddy Night (2 for 1) A MAN'S PRIVATE CLUB 1625 RICHMOND 522-1625
File Name uhlib_22329406_n081_018.jpg