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Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982
File 012
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Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982 - File 012. 1982-05-14. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 18, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/945/show/927.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-05-14). Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982 - File 012. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/945/show/927

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982 - File 012, 1982-05-14, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 18, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/945/show/927.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date May 14, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript May 14,1982 / Montrose Voice 11 Movies Norwegians' 'Making Love': 'Life and Death' and 'The Execution' By John W. Rowberry International Gay News Agency If you think Hollywood making two films in the same year dealing with homosexuality in contemporary men and women (Making Love and Personal Best) is some sort of record, imagine a country like Norway, with a small film industry, and lacking the more liberal social attitudes ofthe rest of Scandanavia, also making two films about gay people in the same year. Life and Death, directed by Sven Warn and Petter Vennerod, is based on their original screenplay about a doctor who falls in love with a medical student. The doctor is happily, we assume, married; like Making Love, this film also deals with themes of coming out and repressed sexuality. Instead of leaving his wife for his newfound lifestyle, the doctor comes out to his wife and tries to maintain both relationships. She is, at first, appalled at the whole idea, but as she comes to know John (the student) and re-examines her relationship with her husband, Jacob, she decides that the feelings the two men have for each other are genuine and valid. Being an accepting wife is not nearly enough. As their triad grows more honest and sincere, problems arise. It is an interesting perspective, in how "Life and Death" views the internal as well as the external pressures that build up in a social environment like this one. The burning question becomes, will they destroy themselves before society does it for them? Life and Death treats homosexuality seriously, and works on issues of trust and jealousy—which have applications across the board. But at the same time, there is a sense of remorse that is nearly unrelenting—and the viewer is set up for a payoff that disappoints more than it rewards. Life and Death can almost be seen as an anti-gay film, in that the gay characters never have a shot at the happy ending from the outset. Being apthetic and misunderstood just is not enough. Ironically, being misunderstood is the basis of the other "gay" film from Norway, The Execution—but where Life and Death was accepting and supportive ofthe characters' sexuality even while the fires were being lit—The Execution is a modern day "Children's Hour" married to "Joan of Arc." This contemporary story is about smalltown corruption and the abuse of power by corrupted small-town officials. After a dramatic rescue scene, where a teacher saves one of his students from certain death, the teacher is asccused of having raped the young boy. The accusation may be true. It may not. The scandal, which turns into acts of sheer terrorism by local thugs against the teacher and anyone who takes his side, is a decoy to avert attention from graft, greed and petty larceny on the part of the police. In fact, somewhere mid-way, The Execution turns into a Norwegian "Boys of Boise." Director Leidulv seems to be vying with Costa-Garvas to cinematically illustrate how any power corrupts absolutely. But, because of the sexual ambiguity of the teacher, we can never really be convinced he is not a villain. And an allegation of rape against a small boy, in any country, is pretty hard to dismiss. The film wants to deceive—here the intention is to keep the viewer from making any final value judgement on the central character. While we are privy to the actions of the police, we are not let in on the truth soon enough. The Execution is a dark, depressing film. The possible homosexuality of the teacher is played like a strip tease to create an environment, coupled with the corrupt local officals, that resembles a moral black hole. The teacher could as easily been created as a whore, or a bored housewife out look ing for some quick afternoon thrills— although I must admit, if I were either of the above, I would still find the film offensive, and one that only works at the expense of a defensive target. If Life and Death are box office successes, does it mean the tiny Norwegian will find budgets for more "gay" films? Let's hope not. 'The Secular Humanism Hour' A group formed to counter the influence of the religious right has won its first battle for equal time with a popular religious TV program, reports the Los Angeles Times. "People for the American Way" complained to a Los Angles TV station about views expressed on The 700 Club, charging the program "Mocked the doctrine of separation of church and state" and promoted Christianity as "The official religion of the United States." After reviewing the complaint, the station agreed to give the group five half-hour public affairs programs to present its side of the story. People for the American Way says it will also ask for equal time from stations airing other religious programs including the Rev. Jerry Falwell's Old Time Gospel Hour. Dangerous drug reports lost in the paper shuffle Congressional investigators say the government is doing a terrible job of protecting you from dangerous drugs, reports the Washington Post. The General Accounting Office says more than 40% of reports of adverse drug reactions are lost by the Food and Drug Administration, and those that aren't lost take five months to show up in FDA computers. It's those reports of dangerous drug side- effects, sent to the FDA by doctors, that triggered investigations into whether a drug should be controlled or taken off the market. In response to the GAO report, the FDA says it will change the way the doctor's warnings are routed and possibly create a toll-free number to receive adverse drug reports. On hump or two? The Australian camel, imported there as a beast of burden during the struggle to open up the country's arid interior in the early 19th century, may soon be playing a new role ... dinner, reports the London Guardian. A group of Libyan businessmen has asked a camel farm near Alice Springs, Australia, to supply 700 ofthe animals to be served as culinary delicacies. The Australians aren't too sure why the Libyans prefer their camels to the African kind, but at prices up to a $1000 a head, they aren't asking questions. SPECIAL FRIDAY RUSH HOUR 5-6 PM 504 BAR DRINKS the GALI E0(N CONCERT 2303 RICHMOND 522-7616 OPEN 2PM-2AM HAPPY HOUR DAILY 2-8 (DAY, MAY 22, 1982/8:00 P.M. TICKETS $6.00 & $7.50 AT THE TOWER THEATRE AND TICKET/WASTER DY MILLS, CONDUCTOR
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