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Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982
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Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982 - File 010. 1982-05-14. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/945/show/925.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-05-14). Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982 - File 010. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/945/show/925

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982 - File 010, 1982-05-14, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/945/show/925.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date May 14, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 010
Transcript MAY 14, 1982 / MONTROSE Voice 9 more formally into an alumni group. When did you form the group? In the Fall of 1979, with the people who lived in San Francisco who I had gotten to know in preparing the book. We just listed all the gay Harvard graduates we had come across or heard about, people from any class, but all in the San Francisco- Bay Area, and we invited them to come to a party. Then later that fall, and again in the spring, we held more parties, and our numbers snowballed, because each time we brought someone new to the party, they knew other gay Harvard graduates, and they came along too. San Francisco was the first chapter, but there are other chapters of the group now too, aren't there? That is right. The San Francisco chapter is the only one that is really called Sons of Harvard. There are now chapters in New York City, Boston, Washington, D.C, and Los Angeles, each with different names, and then there are gay Harvard graduates from all over the county who have been organized through an alumni newsletter that is put out by Eric Rofes out of Boston. I started the groups in Boston and New York by getting in touch with gay classmates. They were gay clssmates whom I interviewed for the book and we followed the same process in those two cities. How do the groups differ? Our group in San Francisco began as a social, fraternal group and remained that way until our last meeting when for the first time a gay undergraduate addressed the group, and elicited a good bit of interest in gay politics as they pertain to Harvard University and gay undergraduates. The group in Boston, from the beginning, perhaps because it is so close to Harvard, has been much more closely associated with the gay undergraduate and graduate groups on campus, and mucn more involved in the particular issues that they are raising with the university. All of these groups have been in existence for about a year and a half to two years now, and they are now in the process of defining themselves and determining just how political they will be, how social, how professional. What sort of relations have the groups had with the Harvard administration? At this point, so far as I know, the Boston group has been most involved with the administration. I know that it has met with members of the gay undergraduate group, and talked about making a presentation to president Bok and visiting various university officials. I don't think that it has done that yet. Members of all the groups, gay alumni generally, have probably had the most contact with the university through the "Harvard Magazine," which is somewhat independent from the administration, but which for about six or eight months has been working on an article on gay alumni. Thus far, though, there has been no official contact here. The core of your group, and the people you interviewed for your book, are in the 35-40 year old age group. What are the differences you see in the way that you related to Harvard as gay undergraduates and the way that more recent graduates have interacted with the Harvard establishment? Most of my gay classmates were homosexuals at Harvard at a time when there was no such thing as a gay group or even such a thing as a gay identity or a gay community. So we really had to work that out, wrestle with it, become gay really after the gay liberation movement came about during the course of the 70s. I think the younger graduates and the gay undergraduates today have gay groups of various sorts, and they have the support ofthe gay community not only in the university but in Boston. On the other hand, I think they probably miss even more the sense of understanding and respect, comprehension, on the part of the administration and straight undergraduates. They suffer from being, I think, misunderstood and dismissed for being gay people; we suffered from not even having those possibilities recognized. What about women? Are there many women members of these groups? Before we even formed our group, one of the inspirations for our idea was the lesbian Radcliffe alumni group. Radcliffe lesbians organized about a year before we did, and as I say, when we got together, we got together by accumulating people by word of mouth, and none of us knew any Radcliffe lesbians. On the other hand, the Boston chapter has made an effort to contact the Radcliffe lesbian group. One of the things we do is to hold biannual convocations of gay Harvard graduates from across the country, each June in Cambridge, and each winter in San Francisco. Last June at the first biannual convocation, the Boston chapter, which is known as HUG, Harvard University Gays, invited Radcliffe lesbians, and I think there were perhaps six or seven women there, and perhaps a hundred men. The undergraduate group now has managed after many years to get women in it, and I am hoping that that's a sign that women will join the alumni groups. What do you see as the future of these gay Harvard groups, but even more broadly, gay alumni groups from all universities ? I formed this Harvard group for symbolic as well as practical reasons, and I think it has very important symbolic functions as well as very real political benefits. Symbolically, I think it is very important for members of every sector in society, whatever nature—academic, civic, social—to organize. That permits them to make a statement that this sector of society, too, has gay people proud enough and political enough to announce that they exist to the world. Gay bodies from those groups can convey a message to other gays in those sectors, encourage them to come out, encourage them to join up, and make their statement to the rest of the world, too. When it comes to a practical, political function, probably these groups are most useful in dealing not with electoral politics, or political issues in society at large, but in political issues involving gay students and their concerns in the particular university of which they are descended. I would hope that particularly as these national convocations grow in size and as more and more gay alumni from all over the country are brought together so that there is a real national constituency, that these alumni groups would exercise both their voice and clout in educating the university administrations about their gay undergraduates, and help gay undergraduates get the same types of equitable treatment, and the same types of special support and recognition and facilities that minority groups need to feel completely fulfilled, to thrive. And then, in addition, are the very real practical purposes of fraternity and suport and strength. When you get a group of like-minded people together, people with similar experiences, they can understand their pasts, they understand better themselves, they become stronger in that their full identities as gay people as well as university people, if they are university people. I think that is a real practical demonstration and manifestation of gay power and gay solidarity and gay fraternity. Shawn P. Kelly is a writer who makes his home in San Francisco. MDA GAYLA REVIEW Kitty Keye, Charlie, Jessica Renee, Vanessa Peterson and Gina Marc head up an ALL STAR SHOW at KINDRED Sunday, May 16 6-8PM $2 donation at the door You will receive a chance to WIN AN ARRAY OF PRIZES Donated by local businesses Drawing for a TRIP FOR TWO will also be held ALL DONATIONS BENEFIT THE MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY ASSOCIATION 2>(_> Invitation to the 1982 World's Fair From $175 per person, twin occupancy, May 1-Oct. 31 2 Nights/3 Days 3 Nights/4 Days FEATURES INCLUDE: • 2 or 3 nights accommodations including tax at The Palisades Condominiums. All units are fully furnished and include use of the complex's swimming pool, tennis courts, sauna and exercise room. • Economy size car rental for three 24-hour periods, unlimited mileage. (Tax and insurance are not included and are payable at the rental counter.) • Two days admission to (he World's Fair For more information on this tour, and for airline tickets worldwide, call Bob Houston Travel Consultants Associated wilh Greenspoint Travel Center Phone 820-4227 (24 hours') We accept all major credit cards __K__k_*__ 2294 HOLCOMBE HOUSTON 665-9678 SUNDAY, MAY 16, 8 to 10PM JOHN DAY & COMPANY Tuesday: Steak night Wednesday: Country & Western Night, LIVE BAND Thursday: Pool Tournament 9:30pm Morning Happy Hour 7am-noon Evening Happy Hour 4-7:30pm 1213 RICHMOND • 527-9071 Extra parking on the comer Mt. Vernon & Rich]
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