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Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982
File 009
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Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982 - File 009. 1982-05-14. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 13, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/945/show/924.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-05-14). Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982 - File 009. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/945/show/924

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982 - File 009, 1982-05-14, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 13, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/945/show/924.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date May 14, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript 8 Montrose Voice / May i4,1982 Books 'Sons of Harvard' examines lives of 10 gay men for 10 years from one graduating class By Joseph DiSabato On behalf of book's publisher SONS OF HARVARD by Toby Marotta. Published by William Morrow and Company, 105 Madison Ave., New York, NY 10016. Hardcover: $13.50. Publication on May 7,1982. In the spring of 1977, Toby Marotta received a form asking for his contribution to the 10th anniversary report ofthe Harvard College Class of 1967. As an undergraduate he had been a familiar figure on campus, an ardent booster ofthe University, and a very politically-involved student. He had been caught up in the political and counter-cultural spirit of the '60's—a time when great concern was focused on personal growth and awareness and the impact that the changing moral and social values of the youth of our county could have on the political system. Marotta became close friends with the son of Larry O'Brien (one of the chief figures in the Kennedy administrtion and the Democratic Party) and saw his destiny as one of involvement in the political process. What prevented him from pursuing these goals was the fact that Marotta was also gay. It was not that being gay in and of itself would have kept Marotta from successfully pursuing a career in politics. He would have remained closeted, as he had during his days as a Harvard undergraduate. It was rather that, as the gay move- ent took shape out of the counter- cultural and political tides ofthe late '60s, Marotta's political interests became refo- cused as he began to deal with his sexuality. For Marotta, the personal became political, and as he pursued his graduate studies at the Kennedy School of Government, the Graduate School of Education and the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (all at Harvard), his area of interest became the politics of the gay liberation movement. His Ph.D. thesis was published last year as The Politics of Homosexuality, and it stands as the definitive work on the history of the modem gay liberation movement, thoroughly exploring the people, the political and social philosophies, and the organizations which have contributed to the struggle for gay rights in this country. When Marotta received the form to fill out for his 10th anniversary report, he had mixed feelings about replying. He questioned whether or not he could honestly report to his classmates the fact that he was gay and what his activities and interests had been—in effect coming out to his class. His chance meeting with a fellow gay member of his class of'67 who had also been politically involved and whose post-graduate evolution had closely mirrored his own made him curious as to how many other members of his class were gay and how their lives might have changed as they dealt with their own sexuality. He wrote back to the alumni yearbook, honestly relating his development and interests including his Ph.D. work. The reaction to his publicly coming out was very gratifying, and he was contacted by many other graduates of the class of '67 who were gay. Marotta decided to meet some of these men and set down their stories in a book—Sons of Harvard. Where The Politics of Homosexuality was an objective, impersonal, scholarly work, Sons of Harvard is exactly the opposite. This new book is an intensely personal account of Marotta's travels across the country to meet with 10 other graduates of his class. It was a journey of self- discovery, taking him from the tenderloin district of San Francisco to the home of an Episcopal minister in Chicago, from a commune in Michigan to the halls of government in Washington. Marotta interweaves the interviews with and attitudes of these 10 men with an intensely personal account of his own changing attitudes, feelings and concerns about his sexuality. Marotta presents us with the fact that "the best and the brightest" (as Harvard men like to think of themselves) can also be the gayest. Sons of Harvard relates the stories of men trying to come to terms with their sexual orientation, revealing their guilts, their fantasies, their deepest feelings. They remember their first sexual encounters with another man, meeting in Harvard Johns for clandestine sex, the horror of being found out. They describe their evolution from involvement in anonym ous, guilt-ridden encounters to partaking in the joys of personal, guilt-free gay sex. As Marotta describes it: "For a good many years, most of us accepted what traditional moralities said about homosexuality. We believed our homosexual feelings were wrong and sick. We thought it sinful and perverse to engage in homosexual acts. We did everything we could to ignore, repress and replace our homosexual longings. We spent endless hours feeling alien, odd, inferior, bored and trapped and hopeless. "For us liberation meant learning how to admit to ourselves that we were homo sexual; to enjoy the homoerotic dimensions of our life experiences; to let non-gay intimates know what we really felt; to discover some sense in traditional ways; and to give homosexuality a natural, appropriate and enrichening place not only in our personal and social lives, but also in our professional and political pursuits." Sons of Harvard is an excellent companion to Marotta's previous work. The Politics of Homosexuality. It presents a persona], human side to the historical and sociological processes of gay liberation so excellently and objectively described in the first book. Interview: Toby Marotta talks of formation of national group of gay Harvard graduates (*£!& # By Shawn P. Kelly Toby Marotta, Harvard '67, has graduate degrees from the Kennedy School of Government, the Graduate School of Education, and the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University. He is the author of The Politics of Homosexuality. After completing research for Sons of Harvard, he organized a San Francisco- based group of gay Harvard graduates called Sons of Harvard, Inc., out of which emerged other chapters, now loosely affiliated in a national network. Interested gay alumni may make contact through the Gay Harvard Alumni Newsletter, c/o Eric Rofes, '76, editor, 22 Bromfield St., Boston, MA 02108. Sons of Harvard is the name of your most recent book, and it is also the name of a group of gay Harvard alumni which you founded. What caused you to form the group? Well. I got the idea for the group, actually, before I was doing the book. To my 10th reunion report I submitted an entry in which I came out, and after that was published and circulated to members of the clasB, gay classmates, most of whom I did not know before, began to get in touch with me and I found that a remarkable excitement came from that, and a remarkable rapport developed. And so this growing circle of gay Harvard graduates became my friends and that feeling of intimacy and fraternity was so strong, that I thought that it could be expanded and shared by organizing it
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