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Montrose Voice, No. 48, September 25, 1981
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Montrose Voice, No. 48, September 25, 1981 - File 001. 1981-09-25. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/9336/show/9315.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1981-09-25). Montrose Voice, No. 48, September 25, 1981 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/9336/show/9315

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 48, September 25, 1981 - File 001, 1981-09-25, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/9336/show/9315.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 48, September 25, 1981
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 25, 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Inside-Part Z ol "The Boy Who Picked the Bullets Up," an interview with author Charles Nelson lnside-"Bot Wax" returns, with the group High Inergy MontroseVoice Friday September 25, 1981 Good Evening Montrose weather tonight: Fair and mild with late night and early morning fog and a low of 67°. Saturday: Sunrise 7:12AM. Partly cloudy and warm with a high of 91 °. Sunset 7:15PM. THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE, ISSUE #48, PUBLISHED WEEKLY Montrose Band impressive at the Tower By Stewart McCloud Although the Montrose Symphonic Band is said to be $5000 in debt, you wouldn't have known it by their performance Sept. 19 at the Tower Theater, 1201 Westheimer. The band was quite impressive in range of selections and in diversity of its members. The group gave Montrose a superb performance. The selections ranged from the classicals of Hayden of Strauss to Broadway and cinema, including rousing renditions of music from Westwide Story and Superman, the Movie. But all was not completely serious, as the band displayed its light-hearted side with "Grand Serenade for an Awful Lot of Woodwinds and Percussion." That selection t.ook the audience by surprise, as instruments were disas­sembled and reassembled with an incredible sound, that at first, you thought, "Oh no, they're messing up." After a few minutes though it became apparent (you had t.o be there, and you should have been) that the joke was on the audience. The Montrose Symphonic Band, under the direction of Andy Mills, is a tre­mendous achievement for our community. We should be proud. And we should support them financially too, Mills points out, as they are goodwill ambassadors for Montrose. Whitmire scolded over endorsement by gay group Appearing before the Seventh Congres­sional District Conservative Caucus, mayoral candidate Kathy Whitmire encountered a hostile crowd Sept. 21 that shouted questions about her Gay Politi­cal Caucus endorsement, reported Juan Ram6n Palomo in the Houston Post. Whitmire maintained she was glad to havl! the GPC endorsement, which pleased few if any of 40 Conservative Caucus members present, the newspaper reported. Whitmire, end candidates Louie Macey and Al Green, and a representa­tive for candidate Sheriff Jack Heard, appeared before the group, with Whit­mire getting the most static and Macey getting the warmest welcome, it was reported. The Poet said the first question wes if she had received the endorsement of tke GPC in response for her promise to recruit homosexuals for the police department. Whitmire answered, the newspaper said, that no such promise wes made. This did not satisfy the audience, es one man wessaid t.oheveshouted "Yeah, but you got the endorsement of those perverts." Whitmire wes said to have answered, in a strong voice, "I am pleased to have that endorsement." The Poet's Palomo reported Whitmire said that if the Texes sodomy statute were changed, there would no longer be any restrictions on hiring gay people as police officers. Dalles activist Don F. Baker has filed a suit questioning the constitutionality of the Texas sodomy statute and a ruling is expected shortly. Shiflett addresses City Council over police practices ''The Houst.on Police Department care­fully refrained from administering tests to (Police officer Kevin) McCoy imme­diately after the incident to detect the degree of drunkeness after he quickly admitted to drinking on duty," gay acti­vist Steve Shiflett charged Sept. 16 before Houston City Council. Shiflett, heed of Citizens for Human Equality (CHE), esked City Council to initiate a review of the policies governing conduct of off-duty police officers work­ing security jobs. McCoy, 26, was found not guilty of neg­ligent homicide Sept. 4 in state district court in the death of gay activist Fred Paez in 1980. Shiflett told city council the killing was "needless." McCoy admitted drinking on the off­duty job. "It is my argument that no Houstonian should have t.o fear a police officer for the possibility of being drunk while on duty," Shiflett said. McCoy denied being intoxicated the night Paez wes killed, after Paez wes said to have made sexual advances toward McCoy and another policeman. "We know that McCoy is homo­phobic- he beat up and broke a gay men's arm in high school. Now, this has occured with Fred (Paez). And as of late, we all have learned tht he is back on the streets with his gun," Shiflett said. Mayor Jim McConn said Council would consider Shiflett's request to review policies for off-duty police officers. Sodomy vote possible on floor of Congress WASHINGTON-The Gay Rights National Lobby says, because of efforts by the Rev. Jerry Falwell, Congress may be voting Tuesday, Sept. 29 on whether "sodomy" should be a crime in the Dis­trict of Columbia. The D.C. city government had earlier repealed an anti-sodomy statute. Rep. Larry McDonald (D-Ga.) is said t.o be ready to introduce on the House floor a meesure to repeal the law and an unnamed senat.or was said to be ready t.o introduce the same legislation in the Senate. Steve Shiflett of Citizens for Human Equality (CHE) in Houston said he had been in telephone contact with GRNL, and was trying t.o alert others of the late­developing situation. "I think we need to call (Montrose con­gres si on al representative) Mickey Leland and (Texes senators) Lloyd Bent­son and John Tower and Jet our feelings be known on this," Shiflett said. "It's too late for letters. This thing is trying to sneak through. Phone calls t.o Washington will help stop it from passing." 2 MONTROSE VOICE / SEPTEMBER 25, 1981 LIVE-IN CONCERT ON THE COPA STAGE TWO NIGHTS ONLY OCTl0&ll TICKETS NOW ON SALE RESERVED $10 SRO $7.50 Montrose News SEPTEMBER 25, 1981 / MONTROSE VOICE 3 Montrose night at the Circus confirmed The MONTROSE VOICE has completed an agreement with Circus Vargus for "Montrose Night" Monday, Oct. 5, when the circus plays at Westwood Mall. Circus Vargus is the largest traveling tent circus in the country. Other circuses, some of which are larger, no longer play in tents but play in stadiums and colesiums. "A circus is not a circus if it isn't in a tent," said David Greenes, an official of the circus. "Circus Vargus did a similiar 'gay night' arrangement with Chicago Gay Life when they were in that city and it worked out quite well," said VOICE pub­lisher Henry McClurg. "They're very good people." The circus will, however, be open to the general public that night too. Tickets are on sale at all Ticketron locations around town and at Westwood Mall. Tickets will be on sale next week at several Montrose locations, including the offices of the Montrose Voice, and they'll be on sale the night of the circus. "There are three prices of tickets-all inexpensive-but we urge our readers to buy the higher or middle class tickets for the best seats, so we can all be near the three rings," McClurg said. The tent holds 5600 people, a spokes­person for Circus Vargus said. Danburg appointed to comm1• ss1• on AUSTIN-Texas state Representative Debra Danburg of Montrose has been appointed by House Speaker Bill Clayton to serve on the Texas Commission on Interstate Cooperation. The primary duty of the coml}lission, created in 1941, is to carry forward the participation of Texas as a member of the Council of State Governments which is an organization of local and state governments and the federal government. In addition, the commission is autho­rized to study intergovernmental problems. Tomlin at the Tower Lily Tomlin will present her one-woman show, Appearing Nightly, at the Tower Theater, 1201 Westheimer, Oct. 6-18, the theater announced. Lowly armadillo to finally get its title AUSTIN-The armadillo will finally be proclaimed the official Texas mascot Sat­urday, Oct. 3, when Montrose-area state Senator Jack Ogg serves as governor for a day. That is, if nothing goes wrong. Ogg, who was elected president pro tern of the Senate this year, should be the ranking state official Oct. 3 when both the governor and lieutenant governor are scheduled to be out of the state. As acting governor, Ogg can issue a proclamation on the armadillo issue, one of Ogg's pet issues, naming it the official state mascot. Ogg tried to get the legislature to pass a law giving the armored mammal special status but was defeated several times. Ogg said he will celebrate Oct. 3 with a picnic on the Capitol grounds. Montrose Voice the newspaper of Montrose 3520 Montrose Boulevard Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright ©1981 Office hours: 9am-6pm Henry McClurg publisher/editor Les Williams office manager Wayne Buell production Ed Martinez editorial assistant Member Gay Press Association Texas Gay News Association News Services International Gay News Agency Pacific News Service Zodiac News Service Feature Services (San Francisco) Chronicle Features Surburban Features United Feature Syndicate Jeffrey Wilson POSTMASTER: Send address corrections to 3520 Montrose, suite 227, Houston, TX 77006. Subscription rate in US: $39 per year, 52 issues, or $24 for eix months, 26 issues. special commercial consultant: Warren Duncanson advertising representatives: Randy Brown Joe Kenner State advertising representative: Roy Hall, Metro Times, POB 225915, Dallae 75265, (214) 528-9944 National advertising representative: Joe DiS­ahato, Rivendell Marketing, 666 6th Avenue, New York 10011, (212) 242-6863 Advertising deadline: Each Tuesday, 7:00pm, for issue releaeed three days later Montrose Mouth Scuse me "Well, why aren't you doing your fan dance?" "Later. I'm the after-hours show." -•- You would have never known that the Loading Dock and the Different Drum were victims of law enforcement abuses a week earlier. Their crowds last weekend broke records-as apparently everyone came to inspect the famous Drum's loft and the LD' s red line. -•- CYNICAL CONFESSIONS: The Mouth is beginning to worry about the Wildwood Saloon-an enjoyable little bar that could use more business. The Wildwood is a great early evening or happy hour club. It's officially "Mouth recom­mended." -•- We've been asked about how we get along with our competitor, TWT. Well, we get along quite well, thank you, in a profes­sional but competitive way. We get along in the same way Parade gets along with Babylon or the Drum gets along with Mary's. We all manage, keeping our minds on the bigger ob:iec­ti ve: a better life for our community. Yes, there's competition. And it is sometimes lively. But it's always friendly. (Glad we're not in Atlanta. They've got FOUR' weekly gay publications now, all fighting like wild cats.) -•- You can count Jack Heard out of the election. Yes, folks, there's no way Jack Heard can now win, as he was endorsed last Sunday by the Houston Chronicle. How can we say that? Do you realize how long it's been since the Chronicle has endorsed a winning mayoral candidate? Many moons. If memory is cor­rect, it's been at least five elections. - •- Andy Mills and his Montrose Symphonic Orchestra put on a superb performance last week­end, but Andy informs the Mouth that the Symphony is broke-$5000 in the hole. Contributions are welcome, he says, as are ideas for fund­raisers. - •- The VOICE is going to the circus. Monday, Oct. 5, 8:00 p,m., is Montrose Night at Circus Var­gas at Westwood Mall (that's out the Southwest Freeway, past Sharpstown), This is a real three-ring circus, under the country's largest tra­veling big top. Koop swoops I• D WASHINGTON, D.C.-President Rea­gan Sept. 16 nominated Dr. C. Everett Koop to be U.S. Surgeon General despite opposition from pro-abortion groups and Gay murder prompts protests in San Francisco gay activists. By Daniel Curzon The nomination was held up because SAN FRANCISCO-The stabbing death Koop, at 64, was too old to fill the poSt as of a 31-year-old tourist in San Francisco originally defined and also because he had never worked for the Public Health by an assailant who leaped out of a car and, according to witnesses, asked first if Service. the victim and his companion were gay Recently Congres voted to remove the has the city's homosexual community age restriction for the post. enraged. Koop had earned the enmity of gay Nicholas Ritus of Seattle was stabbed activists by saying that gay people are almost two dozen times Sept. 13. His trying to reproduce more gay people in friend, Barry Mabus, 34, also a tourist, order to foster the gay liberation was stabbed once in the back when he movement. OGNA tried to come to the aid of his companion. - .llm ~ ~. ~ r ~~ a ~~ a # ~ ~ ~~ m ~ ~ Y.l__j ...... Rent-a-PO-Bo~ Private Postal Systems 1n3 Westheimer 5Z9·30Z0 ONE MONTH FREE 528 Westheimer 521-0187 open 11-6, Tuesday-Saturday LARGE SELECTION OF SOUNDTRACKS & SHOWS 4 MONTROSE VOICE/ SEPTEMBER 25, 1981 Peter Finch in Accused of a love that dare not speak its name. ~!ffaj,fa d (jo~Grf1Z/4, EXCLUSIVE 2-WEEK ENGAGEMENT OPENS FRIDAY, SEPT. 25 GR~E·-FREE VALIDATED - PARKING CJ Greenway Plata 11~ ~;:;~~;~~' Nil ~ Butralo SpeedWay - 626-3339 THE DONS OF HAIRCRAFT WE AT HAIRCRAFT CAN ENHANCE YOUR UNIQUE LOOK WITH A CUT AND STYLE TO FIT YOUR FEATURES, PERSONALITY AND LIFESTYLE. OFFERING PERFECTION IN HAIR AND SKIN CARE­EXCLUSIVELY RK & REDKIN DON DOWDEN MANAGER HAIRCRAFT ONE 2110 LEXINGTON 526-5472 DON GILL MANAGER H A IRCRAFT TWO 201 1 5. SHEPHERD 528-2260 Tuesday's · Movie SEPTEMBER 25, 1981 / MONTROSE VOICE 5 This Week at Mary's: Sunday, 4 m, Beer ust On the Patio 1022 Westheimer, naturally Anti-gay publisher dies BURLINGTON, Mass.-William Loeb, the arch-conservative publisher of the Manchester, New Hampshire Union Leader, died September 13 of cancer. Loeb was 75. Loeb had a running feud with gay peo­ple and gay rights and continually attacked homosexuals in his newspaper. When Jeffrey Allen asked to interview him for The Advocate, Loeb not only refused-he wrote back that "Homosex­uality is a disease. And homosexuals should be quarantined until they are cured of the problem." Loeb carried weight as an opinion­maker because the New Hampshire pri­mary was traditionally presidential candidates' first testing ground. "NO JOB TOO SMALL" --.do VENTURE 1 bESIGNS • ROOFING • REPAIRS •REMODELING (7•3, 861-2464 ·- -------- I ..... r,.. ca C'I I ...; 1:- -~ I Ci,,;) g.::z: C/) c., Q) c~- I :>,Z I ~ ~~8 CfJ v,z=?o- I ;:J ~ " I 5-4 C/) a. ~ Q) Ill o<D • I zo~~ ~ 0 .-: 111'1 I Ci,,;)>- ~OwuO z- I 0 ..;i u~O ...... ::,-. ~ ~ ~ Ill I oa.< ... z Oc I = 0 ... ~~z I lO C. 0 ;:J - ~ ..., z 0 ...,::c z I ~~ < E-- cc - ...... ;:J II,, I ~U~o ill-~ ~ ::c ~ I C/) E-- C') -------- -- -I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Lily Tomlin out, Rita Moreno in, on 'Nine to Five' HOLLYWOOD-There'll be some famil­iar names-Fonda and Parton­associated with ABC-TV's version of the movie Nine ot Fiue. According to Terry Marshall's Daily Insider, Jane Fonda will be executive producer of the program, and Rachel Par­ton Dennison will take over her sister Dolly's role. But Lily Tomlin won't be associated with the TV version. Her part's been taken by Rita Moreno. 2Ns 6 MONTROSE VOICE/ SEPI'EMBER 25, 1981 15th & Yale 864- 7755 Major credit cards World-wide delivery ... - a graphically unique fl,ower mart ... IUDS SUNDAY SHOW TWICE AS HOT! (HOT AUDIENCE, HOT ENTERTAINMENT NAOMI SIMS, HOT CHOCOLATE AND THE PHENOMENAL LADY SHAWN FROM DALLAS -- Through personalized instruction by teachers who care, a career in hair design cannot only be self-fulfilling but finan­cially rewarding. You can earn as much as $20,000 your first year after graduation. Learning the basics. Here are 2 of our students working together on one of our training wigs. SEPTEMBER 25, 1981 / MONTROSE VOICE 7 Working together and learning together is one of the important aspects of our school. We like a fmaily atmosphere. Mr. Vern and his highly-trained staff take pride in giving you personalized attention to make sure that you are the best in your 'field. The foil wrap technique, which was popular in the 1940s, is now back in uogue. Here, Mr. Mark, instructor, is showing his students this European technique. A complete 9-month course (1500 hours), is only $250 down and $110 a month. Call Mr. Vern today. 5014 Bellaire Blvd., Bellaire, Texas 7~401, 666-2318 Gay newspaper has its office shut down By Daniel Curzon SAN FRANCISCO-One of the most important gay newspapers in the United States has been declared bankrupt and its doors locked. The Sentinel, with a circulation of 17,000, has been floundering for the past year, with numerous staff changeovers and dwindling content. Publisher Charles Lee Morris insisted that the newspaper would continue to appear despite the bankruptcy. Morris said he owns the name ''The Sentinel" so HYPNOSIS IT'S THE ANSWER TO SO MANY OF YOUR PROBLEMS AND CONCERNS. QUESTIONS? CALL RANDALL S TEIN, 8 .5 ., R .H . MONTROSE'S REGISTERED MASTER HYPNOTIST. COUNSELOR AND ALTER STATES THERAPIST ANO REGRESSIONIST 840-0636 REASONABLE PRICES MEMBER HYPNOTISTS UNION ANO WORLD Getting away with a group~ a friend or just by yoarsell. Let us help. Serri.ng the travel needs of Montrose . . • • Yoar Travel Experts 522-l.922 3205 .Montrose Houston the bankrupt corporation would not sur­render the name to creditors. The paper's creditors have filed claims in excess of $125,000. Tom Burdick, a former employee and a member of the creditors' committee, said the name of the seven-year-old paper is one of the assets he expects will be sold to help satisfy some of the debts. On September 11, Judge Lloyd King granted a request by the creditors who asked that the paper be shut down so, they said, that its remaining a88ets could be conserved. According to editor Paul Lorch of the other major· San Francisco gay news­paper, the Bay Area Reporter, Morris has been hospitalized with a recurrent illness. ,aN• 8 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 25, 1981 FRIENDLY ELEGANCE ef•• ·a• nc• (tl'.>a:~ns) n Tasteful or,ulcnc.:c in form dccor,m..:in. (lr prc,;,en1a110n COCKTAILS WITH ENTERTAINMENT MONDAY-SATURDAY 11AM-2AM SUNDAY NOON-2AM 0 3012 MILAM• HOUSTON, TEXAS 77006 • (71 3) 528-6720 TEXAS' FIRST FOR MEN 2111 GENESEE NEAR FAIRVIEW AND TUAM 528-6235 OPEN NIGHTLY, ALL NIGHT SEPTEMBER 25, 1981 / MONTROSE VOICE 9 Montrose Counseling Center's Gay Workshop Seminars for Fall 1981 The Montrose Counseling Center proudly presents a Fall series of workshops dealing . with gay 11.festyle issues. The purpose of these workshops is to enlighten and to provide information for better mental health. The Montrose Counseling Center is a non-profit corporation which offers mental health services to individuals and families in the Houston area. Professional counseling and psychotherapy are provided for individuals, couples, families and groups. The Center seeks to address adaptational needs and life concerns of gay men and lesbians. The Center is available to all persons for whom same-sex preference is an issue. Saturday, September 26 Principles For Building A Good Gay Relationship Building a good gay or lesbian longterm relationship. Is it possible? #1-10:00am to 4:00pm Leader: Travis Peterson, MSW, SP Cost: $40 Saturday October 3 Anal Awareness For men who want both, anal pleasure and anal health. #2-12 Noon to 2:30pm Leader: Bill Scott, MSW Cost: $30 Wednesday, October 7 Confronting Death And Dying In Gay Relationships How does a homosexual lover, relative or friend deal with the death or impending death of a loved one? #3-8:00pm to 10:00pm Leader: Ted Hewes, MSW Cost: $25 Saturday, October 17 Gay Men And Lesbian Women As Parents A panel discussion of issues related to being gay or lesbian and a parent or wanting to become a parent. #4-10:00am to 12 Noon Leader: Peter L. Kingan, MA Cost: $25 Saturday, October 17 Assertiveness Training Learn and experience benefits of being a more asser­tive person. #5-1:00pm to 3:00pm Leader: Denise O'Dogherty, RN, MSN Cost: $25 Saturday, October 24 Effective Communication This workshop focus is on improving communication skills #6-10:00am to 12 Noon Leader: Sally Spill, ACSW Cost: $25 Saturday, October 24 Coming Out This workshop addresses the issue of coming out to friends, family, co-workers, the world. #7-1:00pm to 3:00pm Leader: Gary Treese, MSW Cost: $25 Saturday, November 7 Gay And Single This workshop explores the image and lifestyle of sin­gle gay men who experience themselves in an often stressful search for intimate relationships. #8-1:00pm to 4:00pm Leader: Bryan Guiot, MA Cost: $30 How To Register A deposit of $10.00 per workshop is required. This deposit is refundable providing cancellation notification is received by the Montrose Counseling Center 3 days before the date of the workshop. Registration and deposit must be received 3 days prior to the workshop. You will be notified of the location for the workshop(s) at least one week in advance. Complete registration form and mail along with a deposit of $10.00 per workshop to: ~J Montrose Counseling Center 900 Lovett Blvd., Suite 102 Houston, TX 77006 WORKSHOP REGISTRATION FORM Registrant's Name-------------------------- Address _____________________________ _ Telephone (home) _____ (work) __________________ _ Indicate workshop(s) registering for by circling corresponding number: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Deposit of $10.00 per workshop:$ ___ total enclosed. Remainder ofregistrtion fee due on registration. Candidate says GPC should alter position District C City Council candidate Peter Elloway, a Libertarian, says the Gay Political Caucus should change its views on discrimination outside of government. GPC President Lee Harrrington said he respected Elloway, but "it's just not how things really are." Said Elloway, in a letter to the MON­TROSE VOICE, "One GPC (election screening committee) question asks if the candidate supports amending the City Charter to ban the city government from discriminating against certain groups of people on account of physical or psycho­logical being." "As a supporter of individual liberty, I would certainly support this measure; I believe all persons are equal before God and should be before the law." "The question continues to ask whether this ban should also be applied to the private sector. Liberal Democrats tend to say yes, being in favor of increas­ing government control over one's per­sonal affairs, and of increasing the power of politicians over the people." "Libertarians would say no, that one has the right to whatever personal opin­ions one has, whether they are bigoted, intolerant, and stupid, or not. Libertar­ians believe that gays have the same right to not associate with straights, if they so desire, as straights have to not associate with gays." "History proves that one cannot force one's own concept of morality on any other person," Elloway wrote. "The GPC should alter its position on that issue and support individual human liberty," he concluded. THE BED HOUSE BEDS! BEDS! BEDS! DISPLAY SAMPLES-RATED IN THE TOP TEN OF CONSUMER GUIDE KING-SIZE SET s1so REGULAR $499.95 LIMITED QUANTITY ALL SIZES AVAILABLE FULL s11995 REGULAR $199,95 QUEEN $16995 REGULAR $249.95 "CALL NOW" 523-8278 2115 NORFOLK 10 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 25, 1981 Harrington responded, "The meaning of freedom in this country is that you don't allow the denial of basic human rights, regardless. Mr. Elloway's view is a myoptic vision of how things ought to be as opposed to how they really are." PEGASUS HAIR 1740 WESTHEIMER Elloway said this view of his was the reason he did not score as high with the screening committee as did candidates George Greanias and Joe Pen tony. Grea­nias, a Rice University professor, was recommended by the committee and endorsed by the full GPC body. (ACROSS THE STREET FROM THE LOADING DOCK) FULL SERVICE SALON FOR MEN A.ND WOMEN 7·DAY·A•WEEK SERVICE S26-ZS60 A vowed racist found guilty, agai• n SALT LAKE CITY-White supremist Joseph Paul Franklin, who once hurled homophobic epithets at his prosecutor, was convicted Sept. 19 of the 1980 sniper murders of two black joggers. An all-white jury was being asked to send Franklin before a firing squad. The complex trial, with 75 witnesses and 200 exhibits, lasted three weeks, but the jury took only five hours to decide Franklin's guilt. Franklin, 31, while admitting to racist feelings, steadfastly claimed he was framed by state and federal law enforce­ment officials. Last March, Franklin was given two life-in-prison sentences after he was found guilty of violating the rights of two young blacks who were shot to death in August 1980 as they jogged out of a city park with two white teen-age girls. Franklin had earlier filed a lawsuit against the Salt Lake County sheriff claiming the sheriff violated his civil rights by locking him in a cellblock with "sexual deviates" and informants, and photocopying his mail. 526·2668 S26-Z802 PROUD TO BE GAY HAIRCtrn'ERS CAFE ~COUPON COUPON COUPON COUPON COUPON Cl 5 THIS WEEK ONLY g u FROM 7:00 AM TO 11:00 AM ~ z 8 ~ 2 EGGS, TOAST, ~ j POTATOES 8 ::i AND SECOND PERSON FREE c 0 ~ ~ $299 ~ I WITH THIS COUPON ~ U COUPON COUPON COUPON COUPON COUPON Z NOW SERVING MEXICAN FOOD 11:00 AM TO 11:00 PM COMING SOON! OUR BIG NEW SALAD BAR OPEN 24 HOURS 708 W. ALABAMA 528-8837 0 "SERVING GOOD FOOD FOR THE GOOD PEOPLE OF MONTROSE" S3S WESTHEIMER-HOUSTON•S26-2240 SEPTEMBER 25, 1981 / MONTROSE VOICE 11 And all of us at the Coop! BINGO NITE TUESDAY The Chicken Coop Loves Everybody! Especially You! HOUSTON L-O-N-G-E-S-T HAPPY HOUR 7 AM-8PM & llPM-CLOSING PEPPER SCHNAPP SHOTS: All week sunrise to sunset, 75¢, chicken feed 24 Hour Radio Dispatehed ·. phone 759-1441 Serving Montrose and Houston UNtTED CAB CO. "Growing with Houston" 12 MONTROSE VOICE / SEPTEMBER 25, 1981 Join us for the ROUND UP Happy Hour 11 am-8pm daily 66201h S. MAIN 528-8730 UNION Levi's 501 -, Straight Leg Button Fly 0 0 $19.50 I r Levi's 1501 ' • (38" Length) $22.00 Dallas Houston 3918 Cedar 4025 Springs Westhelmer (214) 528-9600 (713) 622-3100 Now in Stock Levi's 27-36 28-38 29-38 (J/!u §7,EEk,1, had, a wo"ld fo"l Ltf Cfh£ ultlmat£ in !Body ~a1-1-a9£ b!:J a Euiiop£an tiiain£d t£chnlclan g:)£t£'t Oiifano1- 524-1529 SEPTEMBER 25, 1981 / MONTROSE VOICE 13 Hot Wax High Inergy achieves the 'new' Motown sound and "Sons" are relaxing and flow smoothly; the latter with a fine sax solo. Soft rock and interesting lyrics make this entire project enjoyable listening. By Jeffrey Wilson • No longer can High Inergy (Gordy/ Motown) be compared to the Supremes or accused of trying to imitate their histori­cal styles. With their newest album titled in their name, High Inergy is finally achieving the sound of sophistication, and the new Motown Sound. • Their music is second to their colorful and imaginative press. This San Francisco-based act is a self-contained band with total control of concept, ideas and packaging. They have written or co­written all ten songs of their most recent LP, The Completion Backward Principle. This group is The Tubes (Capitol). It's as if the level of music and lyrics prepared for this trio hailing from Pasa­dena, California has grown up. All selec­tions contained in this (blandly packaged) album contain quality and a certain amount of maturity and dignity I have not noticed in other High Inergy LP's. The second side is primo material, including the reggae cultured opener, "I Just Wanna Dance With You." This is crisp, clean music struck against rather Recording group High Inergy This is another form of rock at its most different. These rockers (or philosophers) have some meaningful and at times very heavy lyrics checking out "Mr. Hate," "A Matter of Pride" and a real heart-tugging "Don't Want to Wait Anymore." In comparing this to Icehouse, I would venture to say much more ::are, talent and expression emotes from the new kids from Sydney, Australia. After listening to both, it's hard to take the Tubes seriously. relaxing, mellow vocals. Recorded eleven years earlier by Diana Ross on her first solo album since leaving the group, "Now That There's You" maintains its original score by Ashford and Simpson and this time the polished vocals sing out from Linda Howard, Michelle Martin and Barbara Mitchell. "Don't Park Your Loving" and "Soakin' Wet" are more of that sophisti­cated sound I mentioned. Good dance music with decent lyrics and full orches­tration set these numbers far apart from the masses who have tried to copy the "original" Motown dance music sound (long before it was chic to call it disco). "Soakin' Wet" is strongly similar to the Jacksons' brand of boogie with a very recognizable beat and accented horn arrangements. "Heaven's Just A Step Away" is a hell of a ballad from the first side; there's just something special about its delivery that brings it out, and I can say the same for the uptempo "All Of You." "Going Through The Motions" imme­diately reminds me of a dance tune from a few years back: "Best Of My Love" by the Emotions. The sound and style of the song is quite evident especially in the background harmonies. Now, .if High Inergy can move up successfully from this plateau there can be no doubt they will set the trends of "girl groups" for the eighties. • Bill Wray (Liberty) is back to good old rock and roll with a bit of its original roots in R&B. This is both noticable and enjoyable in the album's first cuts, "Blue Eyes" and "A Woman." Wray's attractive vocal style coupled with good guitar and a moderate tempo make the song "Lonely Heart" easy lis­tening for soft rock. In this same vein comes a tune called "Louisiana Rain." With the slight flavor in lyrics and <lt'S our prices we're bending!> ¼PRICE! TWIN FULL s1eeoo REG 380 QUEEN s22300 REG 450 KING s31eoo REG 640 BASWAL BEDDING INCLUDES A U-YEAR WARRANTY C1r1s A Ac:r.essories. 604 Westheimer f.nvminrnental Oe91gn1vFine Furnishm~s. U08 Westheimer ~29-8002 ()pPn Mon-Sol 10-6. Ma1or credit cards & chcdts wr/romu. Ample free parkin,si:. Special Fact0ry Diacxuts ACT NOW-TNS FABULOUS OFFEl'I GOOD FOR A LIMITED TIME OHL YI sound of the late Sam Cooke, "Nothing's Gonna Change My Mind" is equally rock and soul. "Raised On Radio" with its hot guitar and percussion as well as "Dia­mond" have a good uptempo beat round­ing out the variations of rock and roll. The title cut of the Fire and Ice LP from Wray doesn't compare to the rest of the package (not to be confused with the new Pat Benatar single). • Classic pop sensiblity and modern overtones is the key to this debut project from lcehouse (Chrysalis), formerly the F1owers, from Sydney, Australia. Classically trained 23-year-old singer/ guitarist Iva Davies co-produced and co­wrote (or wrote) this entire LP. Original keyboard player Michael Hoste co-wrote three of the tunes and is now pursuing a career in classical music. Co-founder/ bassist Keith Walsh, drummer John Lloyd and newest keyboard player Anthony Smith complete this quintet. "Walls" and "Not My Kind" are high gear movers. The title cut, "Icehouse," HOME OF THE . . MUSTANG::; ~~~ • A song with all the earmarks of dance floor dynamite is the 12" disco single "Give It To Me Baby" by Rick James (Gordy / Motown). This cut from his chart topping LP Street Songs features an easy-to-follow beat, with well blended horns and strings. • Teddy Pendergrass (Epic) is cur­rently putting the finishing touches on his sixth solo album, It's Time for Love. The product is scheduled for release in mid-September and his newest single, "I Can't Live Without Your Love," is due anytime now. Pendergrass was the former lead singer of Harold Melvin and the Bluenotes and it was his style and sound that brought the group to prominence in the early 70s. MEMBER HOUSTON· TAVERN GUILD HOUSTON'S FRIENDLIEST COUNTRY &. WESTERN' BAR WALT'S BIRTHDAY PARTY TUESDAY, SEPT. 29 WITH STEAK NIGHT AT 7 & TERRI ANN MELTON & THE TEXAS HOME GROWN BAND IN THE LOFT 7:3O-11:OOPM 710 PACIFIC 528-9427 14 MONTROSE VOICE / SEPTEMBER 25, 1981 FOUR GIANT HOUSTON ARIA LOCATIONS GulfPW,,. &F-Adj . .. 0..,-- - ·• - · a.n.un., Oct. 1 ... ,,S._ at_tJ Hadwny_te ,M, e&M G artll TIHln., Oct ........ , Oct. 12 SNOWTI-S: CIIV FWY. I FIJQUA-OAN-Cl!fVROUT "°" Sepe 28 8 00 P M Tues.Seo< 29 •30&800P .. Woo Sop! 30 430& B·OOPM TlM.K,.Oct 1 430&800PM WESlWOOOIIAU.-IIWY. St I BISSOIINET 800PM '200 330& 700PM 1 OOA.M 230&600PM 430&800PM 4J0&800PM 4J0&800PM CALL FOR TIMES llaytoMl420-5"1 -712-H11 --­Hwy. ff & abMftnet ll'rl.., O-d. 2-WN.# Oct. 1 Jlltt St. 6 Seawall atvd • TUft., Oct. ll-1111un., Oct. 15 TICKETS ON SALE AT: TICKETRON AND AU CIRCUS VAAGASlOCATIONS o-r11 Adml11lon U•lt 14.85 011114 12.85 Better Seating Available Ticket Information Call Now 271-3450 ' . ... ~ fr . ~ '="-.J ~-~ ~-------­DON'T 1'1155 orr.NINQ DAYI Don c mi. 0pm1ng Dey IKUvtua c,uuon °' Cl'QI.S City ,c..rn 9-00 • I'll ,Ub,Hc tmllcd ff'ft cf? au[~ !B'ta1-1- d?utrtrin9 A Restaurant and Wine Bar 914 W. Alabama-529-0627-0pen Mon-Sat 11-10 3 Course Dinner­Just $7.95 with complimentary glass of wine 6-lOpm epeciala chanied daily 3 Course Lunch­Just $6.50 WINE, BEER & CHEESE HAPPY HOUR 4-7 with 2 for 1. Free Hors D'oeuvres LIVE ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY (except Thurs.) Featuring Jawad, Blues & Folk on Acoustic Guitar DINE IN OR TAKE OUT FEATURING • Best Burger in Town, with French Fries or Baked Potato & Relish Tray • Soup & Sandwiches • Delicious Quiches • Mexican Favorites • Daily Specials • Fantastic Cheesecakes OUR SPECIALTIES: WILLIAM PEPYR Quiche Lorraine Beef Casserole Homemade Pate effigy height: 28" died 1476, Norwich on diaplay at Raul'• Homemade Cakes Enjoy our Champagne Brunch 11-4 Sundays "This is a sensitive, funny, fastmoving, extremely well-written book:' -Richard Hooker, author of MASH "Nobody has written about any war in quite the way Charles Nelson has done it. The war happens to be Vietnam; no matter. The nature of war is the same everywhere always. Kurt Strom, the central figure of this wonderful novel, happens to be gay. That matters. His insights are decidedly different, and they are witty, wonderful, heartbreaking, and always true'.' -Merle Miller, author of Plain Speaking and Lyndon 'l110~ ll()Y ·1010 Pl(jlil~l)111& - IIIJI .. IJ~'l8 IJl~Nmelby Charles Nelson $13.95 Pink Elephant "Oldest & Friendliest in Texas" 1218 Leeland, Houston 77002 659-0040 "(/Jf ay fJi 'l.[ '3-ollie1-'' ..- c ' . with your hostess, . l Laura Lee Love and .rillliLlft. regulars Lana Kane & Eydie Mae Every Saturday, 10:30pm .--- ($1 cover wlll go to performers>---. This Week's Special Guest Jackie O'Shanter HAPPY HOURS Saturday Mldnight-2am, Sunday Noon-Midnight Monday-Friday 4-8pm open 10am Mon-Sat, noon on Sunday A MONTROSE ALTERNATIVE 3EPl'EMBER 25, 1981 / MONTROSE VOICE 15 A conversation with author Charles Nelson By Perry Deane Young Charles Nelson is author of The Boy Who Picked the Bullets Up, released this month by its publisher, William Morrow and Company. Chuck, not Charles, called to say he was in town and ready for the interview the publisher had arranged with me. Apparently I was a combination they couldn't find elsewhere-a writer who had been in Vietnam but who was also homosexual and able to talk about it. Nelson is almost exactly one year younger than I, but he was in Vietnam a year before I was-he as a Navy Corps­man assigned to the Marines in Chu Lai and Danang; I as a correspondent with UPI. In his novel, The Boy Who Picked the Bullets Up, Nelson's fictional corps­man tells his story through letters to four different people back in the States. I iden­tified so totally with the narrator, I could easily have written these letters myself. Nelson chooses to live mostly in a het­erosexual world, sometimes with a woman, always with his ideal sex partner-usually a straight man who's never done it before. As I drove across Washington to Nel­son's hotel, I couldn't help but wonder if the author would measure up to his fic­tional creation. Nelson's Kurt was 6'3" tall and weighed 200 pounds. So was the distinguished looking Charles Nelson, dressed in newly bought gray slacks, dark blazer, blue shirt and tie. Dark patches under his eyes betrayed his lack of sleep; his thin hair was left long and draped across a bare forehead. He gains weight when he writes; he had obviously been writing a spell. He accepts it as part of growing older. He could never pick up a good looking gay guy and a straight man wouldn't care so much about the age of a good head. Most authors who wrote about Viet­nam didn't even dare speak of homosex­uality, but of those of us who tried, nobody has done it so well as Charles Nelson has in this novel. Sex, of course, is only one part of the narrator's life and only part of the novel-but I feel it is a most important part of life and I salute former Corpsman Nelson for telling it as it was. I'd like to do the interview in two parts-first, the facts about your life, atarting with your date of birth and your parents and how you were raised; and then, how you come to write this book and how much of it is based on fact. I was born March 16, 1942, in Pitts­burg, Pennsylvania. My daddy was a coal miner. He died when I was about 13 and we moved to DeLand, Florida. I have two younger brothers and a step-sister. My mother said she married two times­the first time for love and sex, the second time for money. We married into an old Southern family that had money. I always knew I was queer. My uncle seduced me when I was about 6 or 7. He was about fifteen. At school, I sort of decided that being queer and being smart were the same thing. I rather liked being liked, so I stopped being smart. I became so normal my mother pulled me out of school when I was 16 to work in the fam­ily fernery. I did finish high school and then I went to a real podunk junior col­lege for a while. When I was about 20 I found New York. After two years in New York, I went back to school for a year and then I went into the Navy in October of 1965-and I 1tayed in and got an honorable dis­charge. Some people don't believe that, but I got an honorable discharge. See last week's Voice for a review of The Boy Who Picked the Bullets Up I liked it in the Navy. You were taken care of; it was like a big womb, like in school. They made me a medic, and that's one of the best things you can be in the service because nobody messes with you too much. I went to the Great Lakes Training Center for basic training and for corpsman school. They trained us well in the Navy. Then I went to Newport, R.I., where they put me in a hospital on pediatrics. Then I went to Camp LeJeune where they did not train us to be combat medics. I'm pretty bitter about that. We had one 3-mile hike and we had calisthenics once, and unless you were pushy and could get up to the front you never learned any­thing about wounds. It was cool there in North Carolina and a lot ofus were sent straight into the jungles in Vietnam. We weren't tough. They choose smart people to be medics, not tough ones. That's true in the book where I say that of the 800 of our group who went to Vietnam only 260 made it back. Where were you in Vietnam? I was with the let Medical Battalion at Chu Lai and then we moved up to Danang. I was lucky; I got put on KP right away and stayed there for 30 days. How long were you there? From October of '66 until November of '67-it was a 13-month tour. Were you out in the field much? (Sarcastically) It's all in the book, everything's true in it. No, .. I was out for one, two, and three days at a time, but I was never stuck out there; I was not a member of a CAP team. And when you came back? They wouldn't allow corpsmen who had served in Vietnam to work under nurses. My only prejudice is against nurses and that's me in the book. I decided to be a lab technician and that's what I was the last year I was in service. Newport was a triple threat town­there was the old town, the rich people, very social, and all those sailors. Eventu­ally I moved into the YMCA. I got an early out so I could go back to school. But I couldn't get into that, so I hitchhiked around the country. Nixon got elected president and I decided I didn't want to live in a country that would elect him. I moved to Europe. My lover was a film director in Berlin and he helped me get into some films. It's so hard to call him a lover. I liked the guy. He was my buddy. We went to bed together. That lasted about a year and that's the longest I've ever lived with anybody-but it was totally with the understanding that we would have other things going on. So he got me in several films, but I never did go anywhere with it. I was pay­ing my own way but it was still all through him. I came back to the States so I could be on my own. I felt the whold world was waiting for me if I would just finish school. I graduated from Stetson University, a Baptist school in DeLand, Florida. What sort of work did you get into after graduating from college? I've had all kinds of jobs. I was a jail guard and got caught the first time I went down on a guy. I was a hospital orderly and made it with about 30 patients before they caught me. Then, I painted sawmills in the Pacific Northwest; did construc­tion work in Austin, Texas; then collected unemployment in San Diego. I came back and got a job as a postman in DeLand-all I saw were old people so I didn't get in any trouble. Everything is grist for the mill for me; I love trade. What got me off for a while was doing it with one guy while his buddy watched (both of them straight); and then I wanted them to do it while I watched them. You'd be surprised how many I got that way. It was a pretty down life for the most part. Then, a little girl-19 or 20--fell in love with me. I told her all about me and she still wanted to move in. This is where we came to writing the book. Tell me about that. When I was in college, I wrote some papers and I got some A's and that was the first time I ever had an A. I always got my papers back saying "this is not original." Then, a really good professor, Brad Crain, letmewritewhatlwanted to write. So I took these papers to my friend, Paul Schmidt, who did a biography and translation of Rimbaud. We met at Pro­vincetown when I was 20 years old. I was always in awe of him. He had his docto­rate in linguistics from Harvard and he taught Russian. I showed him the papers I had done and he said, "Goddamn, Chuck, this is shit. You can't write worth a shit." But he also said, "What you can do is write fan­tastic letters." This was about 1972when I was working at the post office and my old lady was going to college. She didn't like it because I had Sunday off and she had to study. So I decided I would take some speed and write-although I don't usually have anything to do with drugs. Charles Nelson Book Feature To write, I decided, I had to get rid of my life; I had to write a book about my life and then I could go on to what's impor­tartt. I wrote all day for five Sundays. I had three novels outlined. We moved to San Diego and were living on my unem­ployment. I have myself a raison d'etre by writing. Then we were invited to this party, and I saw Paul there for the first time in a long time. He said for me to send him what I had. I had about90-100pages about Vietnam so I sent that to him. He said, "Listen, Chuck, I expected what you wrote to be funny but I didn't expect genius"-he uses that word easily. He said, "You write; I'll edit for you and find you a publisher." That went on for a couple of years. He taught me how to write and he suggested that I use the let­ter form for the novel. But beyond that it was all me-including who the letters would be addressed to. There were eleven drafts of the book in five and a half years-and he h_elped me with two. Are any of these actual letters you wrote from Vietnam? Only one letter addressed to Chloe and that was one I sent to my sister. That was the one about the chopper going down. At the end of it I couldn't believe I said that, but I really wrote, "Other than that, not much is happening " One draft of the book I did while I was being a guinea pig for NASA. At the time I was working for an insurance company and getting nowhere-then, I saw this ad in the newspaper saying, "Do you want to make money lying in bed?" It sounded pretty good to me. Evidently, the astro­nauts were losing calcium in their bones when they went to outer space and NASA was trying to find some medicines that would counteract this. For six weeks, volunteers were allowed to walk around; then for six weeks we were in bed flat on our backs. We had our own color TV's and stereos. They said I was the only one who had never turned on his TV. I was writing. How did you find a publisher for the book? I finally got a good agent, Anita Dia­mant, who represented Mandingo books. She sent it to eight major publishing houses. This went on for two years, when it finally reached the desk of Bob Bender, an editor at William Morrow & Co. I loved working with him. We argued over only one or two things. Kurt's prejudice, I felt was true to the character; Bender felt it was not necessary. What about baseball? Were you ever on a major league farm team? I played baseball in junior college but I was terrible. What about the sex in Vietnam? How much of that is what you really did? Kurt's me for the most part, but it's like my girl friend would always say: he's a lot younger, butcher, braver, smarter and wittier than you. I mean, it's a novel. My brother tells me he doesn't think Kurt is telling the truth in those letters. What about those bunkers at the air­port? I made it several times in them. I never did. • (Laughter) And does it really matter if it's based on fact if it is true in the book? What are you working on now? It's about Kurt from the cradle to the cross; there'll be much more about base­ball and family and Europe. And sex? And sex. This Kurt has not even begun to get into some of the stuff I've done. The interviewer, Perry Deane Young, is the author of Two Of The Missing, A Reminiscence Of Some Friend• In The War (1975) and co-author of The David Kopay St-Ory. He was a correopondent with United Presa International in Vietnam in 1968 and returned to the war in late 1972 and early 1973 for the last chapters of his book. He is currently writing a book for Holt, Rinehart& Winston about the latest upsurge of right wing politico and reli­rion in America. 16 MONTROSE VOICE / SEPTEMBER 25, 1981 GRANT STREET STATION WE SERVE EVERYTHING EXCEPT ATTITUDE 754 BAR DRINKS & BEER 9P.M.-1 OP.M. EVERYDAY! ., 754 SCHNAPPS ALL THE TIME 2327 GRANT STREET AT FAIRVIEW 528-8342 -TWO PRIVATE PATIOS-We're a friendly rock-n-roll bar. OPEN WEEKDAYS 2PM-2AM WEEKENDS - NOON-2AM -------- TWELVE ••• FOURTEEN... SIXTEEN INCHES? No sir. We are not kidding! STAR PIZZA WILL DELIVER* HOT & JUICY TO YOUR DOOR *within 2 mile radius. * New York-Style hand thrown pizza * Chicago-style deep dish pizza * also available with whole wheat crust * Vegetarian Pizza * Starburst Deluxe Pizza (the works!) * Super Sandwiches & Salads * Fantastic Desserts * Imported & Domestic beer CALL 523-0800 2111 NORFOLK HOURS PLEASE ALLOW ONE HOUR FOR DELIVERY Mon: 11:30am-11:00pm Tue: sorry, closed MENTION THIS AD AND GET $1 OFF Wed: 11 :30am-11 :OOpm Thurs: 11 :30am-11 :00pm Fri: 11 :30am-mldnlght Sat: 4 :00pm-mldnlght Sun: 4:00pm-10:30pm * OVEN HOT DELIVERY * PIPING HOT CARRY OUTS * CASUAL DINING ROOM The Bole People at the Bole Bouse Invite you to the Authentic German Bullet and Beer Bust 109Tuam 528·9066 October Fest Saturday, Oct. IO Noon-? Montrose Classified • indicateo MONTROSE VOICE diatribution point. BEDDING eTHE BED HOUSE-2116 Norfolk- 623-8278 See our ad elsewhere this issue. CLOTHING -CWNE DANCEWEAR-4704 Montroae-622-1873 See our ad elsewhere this issue. -OH BOY! Leather Goodo-9t2 w .. lhei­mer- 524•7859 •DOUBRAVA JONES. the Manhole--1983 W. Gray-622-1089 -SPORTS LOCKER-311 w .. lheimer-520- 6555 •UNION JACK-4025 Weatheimer- 622-3100 See our ad elsewhere this issue. CLOTHING· ALTERATIONS LG THREADS-SI I w .. thelmner #107-623-0802 See our ad elsewhere this issue. DRUG STORE •ALEXANDER'S Drue A Sundrleo- 1220 Weathelmer-620-7600 For Your Everyday Drugs, Cosmetics & Toiletries, Sun Glasses, Greeting Cards, Household Sundries ALL AT DISCOUNT PRICES Alexander's Drug & Sundries 1220 Westheimer, 620-7600 (near Radio Shack) Open 9-6 dally; cloeed Sun. EMPLOYMENT HAIR DRESSER needed at Montroae Hair Deai,n. Followinr preferred. 522-2822. EXPERIENCED CARPENTERS. Imme• di ate openina. Paid vacation &. inaurance pro­gram. Adventure O.irn, 861-2464. EROTICA •ADONIS Newa-1407 Richmond-628-M05 •ASYLUM Booutore-1201 Richmond •BALL PARK Booutore-1830 W. Alabama •DINER'S Newo-24-0 Waolheimer-628-8950 :~!~~~~i¥:~~~~:~~!~l Louiai• •KIRBY Newotand-3115 Kirby-620-0246 eSTUDZ Newa- 1132 W. Alabama: gay men exclusively. FITNESS CENTERS •FITNESS EXCHANGE-3307 Ricbmond- 524-9932 •JIM'S GYM-607 Weathelmer-52&. 11487 See our ad elsewhere this issue. EYEWEAR eTRES CHIC-620 Waolh•imer- 526-0878 FLORISTS eTEXAS CARA VAN & Armadillo Fiower•- 2116 Dunlavy-620-7019 •FRIDAY'S Floriat-1338Weetheimer 324-6618 Flowers in Montrose, or across the country. Call Friday's Florist. -OPTIONS-1603 Yale at -131h-8SS:: 3830 Fresh-Cut Flowers Lead-Crystal Prisms, Herb & Interior Plants, Vari-Colored T-Shirts llft-iKhtti, 'Gurdcu ()11k11, Montro11t- & mnrr !) Tues.-Sat. 9-7, Mon. 12-7 GAY BARS (.\) Houston Tavern Guild member indication, placed in thi• directory at their requNt. •BABYWN-300 Weothelmer-626-6631 See our ad elsewhere this issue. After-houri Fri,, Sat. & Wed. evenings; beer bu1t & imper&0nation 1how Sun. evening ~~w~~Y:~s~~~•& ~! .. ~f~~i~b 1¢i!f. :-::in~~r:in~i::J;!1!o~ci11by Mik!"tt:t? Jon r!tott & Johnny Contreru; light.a by Bili Hidalgo; cover charge nightly. •.\BADLANDS Territory-304 Avondale-g~~ 60& 's:~_1?;o:i86d m~bee~ b~~ ~: noon Sun. & 8flm w!f.; hot dog, &. ham• ~t'.:'.' Sun., ive-play country OJ Ram •BAJA'S-402 Lovett-627-9866 See our ad elsewhere this issue. ~~s!t&1~!~Th~~-~ :h~~~n:eb:U9J>ch 12-3pm Sun.; novelist LarTy Parr lun.; Char­lene Wright with Pearl Murray and Mark Qui­~~~- live piano ent.ertainment 9pm Sun. & •>.BARN-710 Pacific-628-9427 See our ad elsewhere this issue. Buffet Sun. aftemoon;3:1 tournament Mon. ~:hi~~w~: ~~nai ~~t~e':.~ ~=~ Grown band 7:30-llpm; m9.rJarita & 1teak nifht 7\>m Tuee.; white lightemng night Wed.; :;r ;::~r!i=~i:1 t{;ebo~eu~~ thvt~~!'. t.anra. •BRAZOS RIVER BO'ITOM-2400 Brazoo- 528-9192: live country band, Fri., Sat & Sun. evenings; beer bU1t & hot doe• Sun. after• M~~~iJemCi~C.redominantly; home Colt 45 •BRIAR PATCH-2294 W. Holcombe--665- 9678: buffet Sun. afternoon &. Tuee. evening; movie. Sun. afternoon; "Midnight Bowler• Special'' Mon. evening; pool tournament Wed. evenins. -CHICKEN COOP-636 Weothelmer- 326-2240 See our ad elsewhere this issue. Pepper achnappa ahota •pecial daily; bin10 Tuea. evening. -COPA-2831 Rlchmond-62S-2269 See our ad elsewhere this issue. ~::~~h~y~~~=:::~ ~&r:. ~,gulio~treifofld:0 n & '3h'::m~~n!:":i~! entertainment wee\-day_ afternoon,; wet jockey thorta contest 10:30pm Mon.; amateur ~ri~~:~wed~~te~u~e:~e:r::!?~101:r. ~i~t~~. Oct. 10.11; cover charge after 8:30pm COVE-2912 S. Shepherd-624-0170 •DIFFERENT DRUM-1732 Weolheimer- i1!85~:,r:e-:i:~ ~ttb;1fcio= Xr~ houra Fri. & Sat. night.; moviee afwr-houn Fri & Sat& 2c30pm Mon. through Fri.; beer bu•ta Set. & Sun. afternoon•· liquor 1pecial Mon. evening; beer • pecial Tuee. evening; club ni1ht Wed.; home American Leather­men. •>DIRTY SALLY'S-220 Avondale-529- 7525: beer & liquor buat, & hot doge Sat. & Sun. aftemoona; ateak night 6pm Wed.; bina-o nirht Thure. •E/J'i-1213 Richmond-527-9071: ,teak niaht 6-J0pm Tun.; pool tourney 9:30pm Thun. •GALLEON-2303 Richmond-522-7616, fflnt~:«:t't~~a:r~.Yi movie. 6 & 9pm •GRANT STREET STATION-911 Falrvlew-62S-8342 See our ad elsewhere this issue. •HOLE HOUSE-109 Tuam-628-9066 See our ad elsewhere this issue. Special for Montroee Sport. Aleociation bowlen Mon. evemntr. October F•t Oct. 10. •JUST MARION & LYNN'S-Si 7 Fairview-528-9110: leabiana predominantly. •KINDRED SPIRITS-5245 Buffalo Speedway-665-9756: letbiana predomi• nantly. •LAMPOST-2417 Timee Blvd.-528-8921: le1bian1 predominantly. •WADING DOCK-1736 Weothelm_;:: 3~~1~~~ ad elsewhere this issue. Gay men predominantly; aound by Mike Dre-­wett & Larry Fought. ~-- ­• AMARY'S-1022 We1theimer-l528- 8861 See our ad elsewhere this issue. Taped mu•ic by Larry Fought&_ after-ho~ra ~;-~;1~h~;.~~::~: i1~-~~h1~Ji:n~~, Richard Burton, 10pm Tue1.: Al Santora ~~~~t Oct. 18; home Hou•ton Motorcycle ;;:MIDNITE SUN-534 Waolheim•~ 7519: imper,anation ehow• l0om Sun. & Wf'd ;M-ISS CHARLOTTE'S-911 W. Dr~ ~:~~-~i~r~~-h~~';. ~d & ~:/c~m i::! W'~'~A.11~,~~or'"tt!~"ef.t ft:'~n~numey 9pm •MON'fR081.'; MINING CO.-SOf) Pacific ,;29-741i8: Kay m~n pttdominantly· lM"'t·r butit Sun 111ftt-rnoon; hvt---plny J),J ,Johnny Cnntre- "" SEPTEMBER 25, 1981 / MONTROSE VOICE 17 •MONTROSE PUB-1318 Weolheimer-523- 0035: live piano entertainment nightly & weekday afternoon•; buffet 5pm Sun. -OUR PLACE-1419 Richmond-628-8903, "Little Bobby'• Variety Revue" 9:30pm Fri.; buffet & Ju•tine band 9pm Saturday; bar1 ~:.~tl{a~,;~:~~:J~i~1w:l. Mon. •P ARADE-1416 Richmond-520-1646, dioco with Otis James, Ftank Colline & Phillip Large on 10und, Frank Whitten on !1:ht,; ~:~ 0 M!n~-ii~t riern~~~\ ~u~~ co~~~ charge nightly. •PINK ELEPHANT-1218 Leeland- 669-0040 See our ad elsewhere this issue. "Playgirl FoUiea" with Laura Lee Love, Lana Kane, Eydie Mae, Jackie O'Shanter 10:30pm Sat.; gay men predominantly. •RANCH-6620\1, Main-62S-S730 See our ad elsewhere this issue. ~~ ~rij~ t ~:h':°Mlo~.urney Sun.; happy •ROCKY'S-3416 W. Dallas-528-8922: le•bi­ane exclueively. •TRUCK STOP-302 Avondale-626-2160, beer bUlt & cook out noon-8pm Sun. &: Wed. •TWINS-535 WHtheimer-522-6058: leebi· ans predominantly; imperaonation •how 9:30pm Sun.; m~d wreatling Thur8. evening; cover char,e Fri. & Sat. from 8pm. ~WOOD Saloon-1504 Weatheimer- 522-2839, live-pla:,- DJ Sam McGill & Larry Fou~btfrom 1pm FriSaSat.&Sun.; beerbuat& ~:!ceogtti~ ci~t~ t. & Sun.; home Sun• GAY BATHS -CLUB HOUSTON-2205 Fannin-659- =i~~~pe1;:24 h~zuc:eively, memberehip •MIDTOWNE SPA-3100 Fannln-1522- 2379 See our ad elsewhere this issue. Gay men exclusively, open 24 hours. •2308 CLUB-2306Gen-e-62S-8236 See our ad elsewhere this issue. Mr. 2306 Contest 9pm Oct. Z7; ray men exclu- 1ively, membenhip required. open nightly. HAIR CARE •HAIRCRAFI' ONE-2110 Lexinarton- 626-3472 See our ad elsewhere this issue. •HAIRCRAFI' 1WO-201 l S. Shepherd-628-2280 See our ad elsewhere this issue. •HAIRCRAFI', two locatlono: A Red-kin st :1ty~ A2S:MU,t62tl2'&;mmu- •LIONEL Hair Deeign-3220 Yoakum-526- 4494 Montrose Classified Advertising Rates You have a choice of two rates: D 25¢ a word, or D $8 a column-inch. At the 25( a word rate (20¢ if you run theaame ad 4week• in a row, and pay for all fourweeka in advance), all type appean in thie ba•ic 6--point 1ize, with fint two or three word• in ALL CAPS. At the $8 per column-inch rate ($7 if you run the same ad 4 weeks in a row, and pay for all four weeks in advance), you can mix in any way, regular type, bold type and all caps. We'll automatically adjl18t type sizes so your ad fills the amount of space purchased. THERE IS A MINIMUM charge of $3 per ad. BIJND BOX NUMBERS can be assigned for $2 per week extra. WRITE OUT your ad on a plain sheet of paper, with your name and address, and mail or bring it to the Montrose Voice, 3520 Montrose, Houston, TX 77006 AIL CLASSIFIED ads must be paid in advance. SPECIAL LIMITED OFFER: A 25 word PERSONAL for $1. (Add $2 if blind box number desired.) Wish someone a greet­ing, advertise for your fantasy, or just brag on yourself. Anything "personal." •MONTROSE Hair Deiip-4317 Mon­tro. e-622-2822 See our ad elsewhere this issue. •PEGASUS HAIR-1740 Weothelmer See our ad elsewhere this issue. •SALONDANIEL-1626 Cberryhurot-620- 9327 HOME FURNISHINGS •BYMAN'S lnteriora-608 We,thei­mer- f-2&-8002 See our ad elsewhere this issue. HOME REPAIR •ADVENTURE DESIGNS-861-2464 See our ad elsewhere this issue. KEY SHOPS REED'S-1612 We• theimer A 1620 Com.monwealth-623-2927 Reed's Key Shops in Montrose, 2 locations. LEATHER SHOPS •EAGLE Leather-in Mary'a, 1022 Weethei­mer- 528-8851 •EAGLE Leather-in the Different Drum, 1732 Weetheimer-528-8508 •EAGLE Unifonu-in the Load.in&' Dock- 1735 W•lheimer-620-181S eQ-1 LEATiiER-'08 W•theimer-527-9044 -SPLINTERS-in the Wildwood Saloon, 1504 Weetheimer--628-9C'.MO LITERATURE •WIWE 'N' STEIN-620 W,.theimer-629- 7014: exclua:ively CIIY• LODGING •HOUSTON GUEST HOUSE-108 Avondale-620-9787 Houston Guest House: "Where the world meets Houston." MAIL BOXES •KWIK-K.ALL Mail Boxet-3317 Montroee- 522-1896 ''\\'':~ Ever wonder how you ended up in a gay cartoo1jJ- Montrose Classified Su~ 8!!" f ald C~!e~~e~at SIPT Sin 25 26 Sll'T SIPT SIPT SIPT 27 28 29 30 For additional information about event, lilted below, look for the eponeoring organization under "'Orsanizationa"' in the Montroee Clauified. Selected Events through 7 Days • FRIDAY: Interact/Houston's Community Coffeehouse 7:30pm­midnight at 3405 Mulberry • FRIDAY: Lambda Al-anon meeting at First Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin • THURSDAY: Wilde 'n Stein gay radio show lOpm-midnighton KPFr Radio, FM-90 MUSIC JAZZ GUITARIST -u players •.. du ... , more. 523-6886. ORGANIZATIONS ATJ'ENTION ORGANIZATIONS, Call the Voi~ with your organization'• newe and meet.inc date., 529-8490, aftemoona. A CAPELLA Chorua-c/o (Montro,e• Church of Chriat, 520-K Weetheimer-52J. 6138 ACLU-1236 W. Gray-52-4-6925 AMERICAN LEATHERMEN (IOcial club)­=; l:~~b?w:t.1732 Weatheimtt- ASTRO Rainbow Alliance--651-9577 BERING Memorial Methodiat Church-l.f40 Hawthorne-526-1017; Inteu,ct'• Commu­nity Coffeehouse 7:30pm-midniaht Fri.; Uni­ted Methodiat worehip N'l'Vice 10:50am Sun.; ==!:11:~1~;:.~-: Jnte- BETWEEN TWO Worlda-529-191~- meetinJ Oct. 8. Between 2 Worlds Couples Group (Bi/ Gay /Lesbian plus Bi/ Straight) offers peer support, discussion bi­monthly. Write POB 1125, Houston 77006, or phone 529-1913. BLACK & WHITE MEN Toeether-529-5006, 774-3691. (Mon,,._) CHURCH OF CHRJST-5~K Westheimer-623-6138 COLT '5'S (M>Cial club~Ntl at Bruoe River Bottom, 2400 Braz.oe-528-9192. COMMUNITY COFFEEHOUSE-project of Interact CONG. BETil CHIAM-maet. at MCCR, 1919 Decatur-5-76, 624-5180, -.:. & aocial 8pm Fri. COURT OF THE SINGLE STAR-maet. at Pink Elephant, 1218 Lael.and...--0040 CRISIS HOTLINE-228-1606 DATA PROFES.SIONALS-meet. at La Quinta Motor Inn, 4015 South wen Fwy.- 522-7809, 623-6922, meeanr Oct. 13. DIANA FOUNDATION-2700 Muon-524- 5791 DIGNITY-- at Catholic Student Cen­! er, 1703 Boloov,.-523-764•, meeting 8pm Tbun. EPISCOPAL INTEGRITY-maet. at Autrey ~".°r:1.6265 Main-5-298, meetina7,30pm FAMILY & FRIENDS of Gayo-maet. at MCCR. 1919 Decatur-maeti1>11 Oct. 11. FIRST UNITARIAN Cburch-5210 Fannin-62fr1571: Lambda Alanon meetins Fri. evenins; wonhip Nrvice San. momins. FM1960 AREA Gayo-821-9681 GAY ARCHIVES of Tuu--ject of Inte­ract Selected Events Later •IN 1 WEEK: Montrose Night at Circus Vargus, Westwood Mall, Oct.5 •IN 1 WEEK: Opening of the Montrose Clinic at 104 West­heimer, Oct. 6 • IN 2 WEEKS: Full moon Oct. 13 •IN 3 WEEKS: Westheimer Col­ony Art Festival Oct. 17-18 •IN 5 WEEKS: Halloween Oct. 31 GAY ATHEISTS Leae-e of America-522- 7531 or 524-2222 GAY HISPANIC CAUCUS-52!4484 GAY ITALIAN Group-526-9844 GAY NURSES & PHYSICIANS of Hou,ton--c/o GPC, 4600 Main ;t217-m. 2287 GAY PEOPLE in Madicine-522-7360 GAY POLITICAL CAUCUS (GPC)-4600 ~n #217-621-1000: eeneral buaineu meet.­me 7:30pm Oct. 7; educational forum 7:30pm Ocl21. GAY YOUNG ADULTS HEPATITUS HOTLINE-Jim or David at TI7-'l2:d7: a project of GPC's Medical Commit­tae. HOME COALITION & Oral Majority-14-09 Oakdale-521-0196 HOMOPHILE INTERFAITH Allianco--729 Manor-523-6969 HOUSTON COMMUNITY CLOWN5-862· 8314 HOUSTON HEALTH Department-1115 N. MacGreeor-222-4297: venereal dieeaee teeta daily weelr:daye; rape oouneeling eeNion for women Wed. evenin&". HOUSTON HUMAN RIGHTS LEAGUE- 523-6969 HOUSTON MOTORCYCLE CLUB-cl o Mary'•• 1022 Weetheimer-528-8851 HOUSTON TAVERN GUILD, mernbero ~~1:;,~:. ~J:t1:~u~rn, Dirty Sally'e, EDle, •INTERACTI Hou1ton (1/H lnc.)-3•05 Mulberry-529-7014, 69•-1732: Community Coffeehoue 7:30pm-midni,ht Fri.· cenei:al bueineae meeting 7:30pm Thun.; poker activ­ity &'l'OUP meetine 7:30pm Oct. 8; educational forum 7:30pm Oct. 15; earege eale Oct. 17. •KPFT Radio, FM-90--419 Lovett Blvd.-526- 4000: Wilde 'n. Sit.In e•Y radio show lOpm-midnieht Thun. • LAMBDA ALANON-meet.e at let Unitar. ian Chu.rch, 5210 Fannin--521-9772: meetine Fri. evenllll'.. LESBIANS & GAY PEOPLE in Madicine- 665-4760, meebnr 7,30pm Oct. 3. LUTHERANS CONCERNED-meete at Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh-521- 0863, 453-11•3, maetinr Oct. 13. ~;!t,'S!:"~~; ~h~chj~ Hawthome-527-9669: meetmt 7:30pm Tuee. MONTROSE CIVIC Club (Neartown)­meete at Serine Church, 1440 Hawthome- 522-1000, meetin• 7,30pm Ocl 27. MONTROSE CLINIC-UM Weatheimer- 528-5531: ooenimr Oct. 6. MONTROSE COUNSELING Center- 900 Lovett #102-529--0037 See our ad elsewhere this iBSue. MONTROSE PATROl.,-620 Weotheimer- 528-2273 MONTROSE SINGERS-maet. at MCCR, 1919 Decatur-527-966g r~~o::,.r~TSB~~=~~\-uost winter bowline leasue 1amee 9pm Mon. MONTROSE SPORTS CAMPING-665- 173• MONTROSE SPORTS FLAG FOOTBALL- 961-0662 MONTROSE SPORTS SOFTBALL-664- •26• ~!~JSJari~~ TEt~~>M\ -ctioe 7'30-I0pm Tbura. MONTROSE SPORTS VOLLEYBALL- 622-3•87 18 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 25, 1981 MUSTANGS (aocial club>-meeta at the Bam, 710 Pacific-528-9427: color night Mon. OPERATION DOCUMENTATION-project ofGPC (Fred) PAEZ TASK FORCE-clo GPC, •600 Main #217-521-1000, 521-9186, 523-3233. RICE Univ. Gay/ Lesbian Support Group-524-072>4 SUNDANCE CAITLE COMPANY (aocial club}-<:/ o Wildwood Saloon, 1504 Weethei­mer- 850-9390: club night Wed. TEXAS BAY AREA Gayo-332-3737, meet­ing Thun. evening. TEXAS GAY TASK FORCE-c/o Houeton Gueet Houee, 106 Avondale-529-7014, 520- 9767 TEXAS HUMAN RIGHTS Foundation- 1519 Maryland-526-9139 UNITARIANI UNIVERSALIST Gay Caucue--c/o lat Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin-528-5842: meeting Oct. 18. WESLA YAN FELLOWSHJP-864-8899 WESTHEJMER COLONY ARTS Auociation-908 Weetheimer-521-0133: fall festival Oct. 17-18. PERSONALS ~~~i::g~~k~. The::_n/zt~;rks ata- GIW/M, 28, TALL, slim, eenaual, nice smooth body, ueka friend for quiet daytune meetinge. SeneitiY1ty, diecretion and warm vibrations. Willing to liaten and to eee deeper than the eurface. Send deecriptive letter to J.D., 2615 Waugh Dr. #115, Houston, TX 77006. GREENSPOINT AREA New to Houston, married w/ male in early 30a wiehee to meet 1NUD.e or einele men in 308 or 40e for friendship and good timee. Oiecretion ueured and hke­wise ex~. Write D. W, P.O. Box 90762, Hou.ton, TX 77090. ~~-~~~~rtePrJ~d1 ~~1hd~eio; and print. Custom fab and p~feesional pho­tographer available for portra1ta. 526-3135. BLACKS, WHITES, 3rd World Gays. (415) 431-0458 anytime. PUBLICATIONS INNER-VIEW-520 W•th.eimer-522-9333 •MONTROSE VOICE-3620 Montrote #227-629-8490 The Voice covers Montrose 8:u~oont! 1:supi~;°:·v~in':.' ~i i91ue to be releaeed Fri. eveniq, Oct. 2. TWT-2205 Montrooe-527-9111 RECORDS & TAPES •DOWNBEAT-2117 Richmond-523-8.1•8 •INFINITE RECORDS-528 W..theimer- 521-0187 See our ad elsewhere this issue. •RECORD RACK-3109 S. Shepherd-624- 3602 RESTAURANTS •SAJA'S-402 Lovett-627-9866 See our ad elsewhere this issue. Champagne brunch 12-3pm Sun. •BRASSERIE-515 W. Alabama--628-8744 •CHAPULTAPEC-813 Richmond-522- 2365 •DECATUR CAFE-708 W. Alabama- 628-8837 See our ad elsewhere this issue. •HOUSE OF PIEs-3112 Kirby-528-3816 aJADE DRAGON-224 Weotheimer-626- 2683 •RAUL'S BRASS RUBBJNG-914 W. Alabama-629-0627 See our ad elsewhere this issue. eSTAR PlZZA-2111 Norfollt-623-0800 See our ad elsewhere this issue. eSTEAK 'N' EGG-•231 Montroae-5211-8135 e'J'EDDY'S-2•3 Wootheimer-529-668• eTIM'S Coffee Shop-1525 Weetheimer-529- 2289 SCHOOLS ~,!;t.~~~Wu:"'bool-6014 Bel- See our ad elsewhere this issue. SHOPS •ALL THAT GUTI'ERS-•325 Montroee- 522-6976 •HYMAN'S Gilio & AccONOriM-604 Weethelmer-629-8002 See our ad elsewhere this issue. •FACETS-1•12 Wootheimer-523-1412 Gary Larson --------------- "Arnold! The bird! The bird! ... You get back up there and gel the bird!" 1981 SAN FRAN CHRONICLE FEATURES ~--• .rr "You're kidding! . . . I was struck twice by lightning too!" 0 1 "Tough-guy, huh?" Montrose Classified SEPTEMBER 25. 1981 / MONTROSE VOICE 19 oTEXAS JUNK CO.-Taft at Wolch- 624-6267 See our ad elsewhere this issue. oTREYMAN-407 Weetheimer-523-0228 TAXI •UNITED Cab-769-1441 See our ad elsewhere this issue. TRAVEL AGENCY PRESTIGE Travel-3206 Montro1e- 622-1922 See our ad elsewhere this issue. TYPESETTING & GRAPHICS ;:~Naio~?.~. ~i~11J:lf~ttin1- Fast, accurate, computerized typesetting-and printing. Small and laree jobs. Publicatione, catalogs, brochuree, form,. We 1pecialU:e in compli­cated, unusual project.I, but also do email, 1itnple jobe-inexptnaively. Try us. VACATIONS Gueat houae in the country for men. Perfect weekend"~ Away" for the fall. Pool, sauna, hot tub, meal,. EL RANCHO VISTA GLEN ROSE, TEXAS (817) 897-4982 or (817) 645-5192 Montrose Theater/Concerts/Art/Movies Live Theater This Week Near Montrose (Friday, Sept. 25, through Thursday, Oct.l) Main Street Theater-Autrey Hou1e, 6265 S. Main-524-6706 The Philadelphia Story 8:30pm Friday, Saturday and Thursday. Stages Main Stage-709 Frank­lin- 225-9539 Whose Life Ia It Anyway, 8pm Friday, Saturday and Thursday. Concerts This Week In Montrose (Friday, Sept. 25, through Thursday, Oct. I) Ab and the Rebel Outlawa (country band) 9:30pm Friday and Saturday at the Exile, 1011 Bell, 659-0453; Sunday eve­ning at Brazos River Bottom, 2400 Bra­zos, 528-9192. Randy Allen and the Double Eagle Band (country) 9:30pm Thursday at the Exile, 1011 Bell, 659-0453. Flying Blind (country band) 9:30pm some nights at Mi88 Char­lotte's, 911 W. Drew, 524-9214. Donna Corley and Charlene Wright (piano) 9pm nightly except Sunday and Mon­day at Baja'• 402 Lovett, 527-9866. Tbe Haakell• Thursday evening at Babylon, 300 Westheimer, 526-6551. Dr. Rock.it (R&B) Monday evening at Rockefeller's, 3620 Washington, 864-6242. Robert Seballoa Group (jazz) 9pm except Monday at Lao Brisae, 614 W. Gray, 528-9959. Philip Settle Band 9:30pm except Sunday and Monday at Birdwatchero, 907 Westheimer, 527- 0595. Charlene Wright with Pearl Mur­ray and Mark Quillley (piano) 9pm Sunday and Monday at Baja'a, 402 Lovett, 527-9866. Art This Week in Montrose (Saturday, Sept. 26, through Friday, Oct.2) Contemporary Arte Muaeum.:: 5216 Montr096 Blvd.-526-3129 Other Realitiea: Inatallaticn, for Per­formance, in the Upper Gallery; June Kanelw: Parallel Sou,ula in the Pers­pectives Gallery; 10am-6pm Saturday, noon-6pm Sunday, 10am-5pm Tuesday-Thursday. Mu1eum of Fine Arta-1001 Blaaonnet-526-1361 The Diaghilue Heritagein the Romansky Gallery; Nijinaky'• L'Apres Midi D'Un Faune' (Baron Adolphe de Meyer photography) in the Library Gallery; Image, on Childhood in the Maeteron Study Gallery; New Acces­aicn, in Photography in the Lower Brown Corridor; Jmpre•sionist and Post-Impre.,ioniat &lectiona from the &ck Collecticn in the Jones Gallery; 10am-5pm Saturday, noon-6pm Sun• day, and 10am-5pm Tuesday through Friday. Movies This Week In Montrose (Friday, Sept.25, through Thursday, Oct.!) • SHOWING ALL WEEK Titles to be announced: 2:30pm week• days, Different Drum, 1732 West· heimer, 528-8508 • FRIDAY ONLY Title to be announced: 2:15am (Sat. morning), Different Drum, 1732 West· heimer, 528-8508 •SATURDAY ONLY Title to be announced: 2: 15am (Sun. morning), Different Drum, 1732 West­heimer, 528-8508 • SUNDAY ONLY Title to be announced: afternoon, Briar Patch, 2294 W. Holcombe, 665-9678 • MONDAY ONLY Title to be announced: 6pm and 9pm at the Galleon, 2303 Richmond, 522-7616 • TUESDAY ONLY The Taming of the Shrew (1967 drama) starring Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton, 10pm, Mary's, I 022 Westheimer, 528-8851 Montrose News Two women get probation for Montrose burglary Two sisters convicted of steal­ing $1500 in silver items from a Montrose house with the appar­ent aid of a deputy constable have received 10 years proba• tion for burglary, reported the Houston Chronicle. Shiela Lister Froberg, 26, and Mary Carol Lister, age not reported, were sentenced Sept. 10 by state District Judge Tho­mas Routt for the January bur­glary in the 3700 block of Mt. Vernon. They had earlier entered guilty pleas. The Harris County deputy constable, Cecil Erwin, 27, was charged with burglary after it was alleged that he helped the two women take silver platters, goblets and trays from the home. He plead guilty shortly after the incident, was placed on five years probation and fired from his job as deputy constable. The charges were the first fel­ony charges resulting from the just-instituted "Crime Stop­pers" program of the Houston Police Department. Erwin's boss said the women told the deputy they had for­merly lived in the house and were just stopping to pick up some property they had left behind. Erwin, of 11770 Westheimer in southwest Houston, surren­dered at the downtown Houston police station Jan. 13 and was jailed in lieu of $10,000 bond. Detective Billy Sims said resi­dents in the 3400 block of Mt. Vernon reported the next day they saw two women loading the silver items into a car. They took down the license plate number and reported it to police. The car was traced to Erwin. Erwin's boss, Precinct 5 Con­stable Ed "Tracy" Maxon, said police had told him that Erwin met the women, who he knew, at a bar while off-duty, then agreed to take them to the house where they told him they had formerly lived. The women reportedly told Erwin they were just stopping to pick up some of their property. Erwin was said to have never entered the house. "It appears that he used some bad judgement," the Chronicle quoted Maxon as saying and added that Erwin had been an employee since December 1979 and was assigned to Maxon's civil di vision. The Crime Stoppers program, which started Jan. 12, offers cash rewards to persons provid­ing information leading to an arrest and felony indictment. A special phone number, 222- 8477 (222-TIPS), is manned by the police. Callers may remain anonymous. SamanthaReads Your Stars IF YOU WERE BORN THIS WEEK: You are the forceful, aggres• sive type, at least during your birthday weekend. Unless you want to be steamrolled, be ready to give as well as take. The other one will soon get the message! Days continue with a pop, bang, fizz. ARIES: Horizons begin to change this weekend, and you'll start to see new fields to conquer. Do finish up the old ones before you go galloping off to explore. Watch for financial action and an important communication. TAURUS, You've been so busy with others lately that you may have let your personal affairs slide. Put yourself back in order this weekend. Besides tending to mu.,dane matters, make time for both peace and quiet and social fun. GEMINI: Take advantage of new opportunities to meet people this weekend. Some of them may develop into much more than passing acquaintances. Avoid both gossipers and do-gooders, though. Weekend's close may see a clash of wills. MOONCHILD: Public duties call. And, though you'd rather stay in the wings, you should make your official appearance. Finally, lay plans for new project in secret. LEO: You 're frisky as can be this weekend. Look for a new love interest, a dash of inspiration and a full social calendar. The nightlife has a surprise in store for you as the pace becomes hot and heavy. VIRGO: Putting the final brush strokes on several works sets off a flurry of activity. You have places to go and people to see. News from afar may have important consequences. Final days see home pots bubbling over. LIBRA: Joint efforts may have a few problems in terms of personality differences and lack of true cooperation. It's your dec1sion whether to continue or quit. Later, a bright new door opens. SCORPIO: There's work to do and don't dare just hit the high spots. Be thorough! Then, someone special could turn your emo­tions topsy turvy; fasten seat belt. Days close with cash, clatter and a clean sweep. SAGITTARIUS: This weekend, you may leap before you look. Enjoy many kinds of activities, but plan ahead for them is not your best attribute. Although you 're a people-person, this week­end you'd like to be your own boss and strike out on your own. CAPRICORN: You're adventurous, an initiator and a leader in love activity. You can be a real powerhouse in almost any field you choose, so do. You are generous, friendly but impulsive. AQUARIUS: At this season, your fancy turns to autumn plan­ning. Get down and get it done, so you'll have time for next week's special treat. PISCES: News and messages create quite a hubbub. Speak gently but firmly with those whose favor you seek. Plans are made with friends, involving both social affairs and bar meet­ings. Accentuate the personal. Tie a knot. Trend by Henry McClurg A salute to the gay bars In the struggle to achieve respect for gay people from non• gay society, gay activists at times overlook something-the factor played by gay bars. If it were not for gay bars, I dare say gay rights today would be ten to twenty years behind where it is now. Gay activists themselves on occasion forget the courage, and the drive, required to open antl operate a gay bar­especially in years past. Ten years ago in HoUBton there were a dozen gay bars­and not a single gay rights organization. And there were no "friends" of gay people in government office. A gay club owner's best chance of survival then was to get noticed by gay people but to remain unnoticed by all others-a difficult task. Today, operating a gay bar is only a little easier, as the raid last year at Mary's and the hassles the past few weeks at the Different Drum and the Loading Dock point out. The largest part of today's open gay community "came out" in gay bars. It was in a gay bar that most of us met other gay people for the first time in any large numbers. Looking at the crowd in our first gay bar, we thought, "Gee, I'm not the only one. And God, they all look so good." Thank you for giving us the gay bars. 20 ~!)!BS & GENTLEJte.i,. &, CHILDREN -'V' OF A.LL AG · _._ The Montrose Voice PRESENTS :MONTROSE NIGHT · at THE CIRCUS MONDAY, OCT. 5th, 8:00 P.M., WESTWOOD MALL CIRCUS VARGUS
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