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Houston Voice, No. 844, December 27, 1996
File 023
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Houston Voice, No. 844, December 27, 1996 - File 023. 1996-12-27. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/915/show/904.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1996-12-27). Houston Voice, No. 844, December 27, 1996 - File 023. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/915/show/904

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 844, December 27, 1996 - File 023, 1996-12-27, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/915/show/904.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 844, December 27, 1996
Publisher Window Media
Date December 27, 1996
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 023
Transcript ■*T>iYoiirNext\lsfttoHoiJSton... What you get at the motel on the highway & what you get at the Montrose Inn Motel: Heterosexuals with kids fighting next door. Montrose Inn: Gay men next door. Only gay men. Nothing but gay men. Motel: Several miles to the gay bars. Montrose Inn: 5 tiny blocks to the gay bars. Motel: Drive to the gay bars & pay $5 to park. Or take a $15 cab. Montrose Inn: Walk to the gay bars. Or take a S3 cab. Motel: Drive back from the gay bars and risk the cops making you walk the straight line. Or take a $15 cab. Montrose Inn: Walk back from the gay bars. Or take a $3 cab. Motel: Pay $39 to $95 a night for a room. Montrose Inn: Pay $41 to $79 a night for a room. Motel: Eat in their restaurant. Food for the masses. Pay plenty. $1 soft drink machine. Montrose Inn: Complimentary late night sandwiches & full breakfast the next day. Free soft drinks, juices, coffee 24 hours. Motel: Cruise the parking lot and get threatened. Montrose Inn: Cruise the hallways. Please! Motel: The receptionist sneers at you. Montrose Inn: The receptionist winks at you. Motel: Washing machine? Ironing board? Hair dryer? Refrigerator? Stove? Microwave? VCR & gay movies? Are you kidding? Montrose Inn: All of the above. Free to use. Motel: Full size bed, everything else is plastic. Montrose Inn: Queen size bed, hardwood floors, hardly any plastic. Motel: Maid knocking 8 a.m., you moan but she's coming in anyway. Checkout 11 a.m. Montrose Inn: Handsome man next door knocking 11 a.m. to join him for breakfast. Checkout 1 p.m. Reservations requested. 1-800-357-1228. The house at 408 Avondale. The Montrose Inn is NOT a motet. We're NOT a hotel. We're a Bed & Breakfast. (And we're Basic & Butch. We're the B&B that's B&B.) We're completely different! COLUMNIST Preferred Graphics The Preferred Source for Computer Graphic Design High Quality, Custom Designed Graphics. intemetweb Page Design ^ Effing 713.528.7654 Do you need reliable service for your graphic needs? Providing superior graphic design to our community is our specialty! And it comes with a Customer Satisfaction Guarantee! We offer design & layout, desktop publishing, typing, and printing to meet all of your graphic requirements. From calling cards & stationary to ad copy & design, go with the preferred source... Preferred Graphics. Charter Member HOUSTON CHAMBER of Commerce pgraphic@neosoft.com 4200 Montrose Blvd, Suite 540 cHxx^iAou^ ^l<U6Me<u A New Web Page for Our Global Community Businesses! co«nity Services Personals W"'" Past Out By DAVID BIANCO Who Was Terry Dolan? Ten years ago this week, Terry Dolan, a key conservative activist of the 1980s, died of AIDS. Even as a child, Dolan was active in Republican politics, volunteering for Richard Nixon's 1960 presidential campaign. When he was 25, he helped organize the National Conservative Political Action Committee (NCPAC), and he soon became that organization's director. Dolan was an extremely talented fund raiser, and many credit him and his organization with the stunning triumph of the New Right in 1980. Dolan worked hard for the nomination and election of Ronald Reagan as President, although his influence was equally significant in the defeat of liberal Senators such as George Mc- Govern, Frank Church and Birch Bayh. The conservatives who replaced them (including Dan Quayle) gave the Republicans a majority in the Senate for the first time in a generation. Dolan was also gay. He was a regular in the gay cocktail-party circuit of Washington, DC, and often vacationed at gay resorts such as Northern California's Russian River. But Dolan's relationship to the gay-rights movement was complex. Philosophically, Dolan was opposed to gay-rights laws, insisting that the government shouldn't interfere in people's hiring practices. He balanced that view with a strong defense of privacy—which makes sense, because a decade before "outing." he relied on the gay community's discretion to keep him from being discredited among his conservative peers. In 1982, he granted an interview to The Advocate in which he repeated his sup port for privacy and criticized "some of the rhetoric that some of my friends in the right have used on gay activism." But Dolan (who later denied those comments) was nol above using anti-gay rhetoric himself. NCPAC sent out a fund-raising letter that declared "the nation's moral fiber is being weakened by ihe growing homosexual movement and the fanatical ERA pushers (many of whom publicly brag that they are lesbians)." Some say Dolan approved the letter, although he apologized for it to the New York Times, calling it "totally inappropriate." In the early 1980s. Dolan joined with former Republican Congressman Robert Bauman, famed discharged gay Vietnam veteran Leonard Matlovich and several other gay conservatives to found the Concerned Americans for Individual Rights (CAIR). Unlike the gay Republican group the Log Cabin Club, CAIR found little success. Few members were willing to take leadership roles if it meant publicity, and while many gay conservatives offered words of encouragement and even cash donations, few would write checks or even allow their names to be associated with the group. At one point, the group proposed to send out a fund-raising letter to find conservatives who would support gay rights, and several of the organizers are said to have requested the names and addresses of any anti-gay responses so they could target those individuals with homophobic fund-raising appeals. By the time of Dolan's death, CAIR had largely faded away. When Dolan began to get sick with AIDS, he insisted publicly that he suffered from anemia and diabetes. When he died, his family held a memorial service that excluded Dolan's gay friends. Instead, conservative mourners such as Pat Buchanan and Utah Senator Orrin Hatch came to pay their respects to a key architect of ihe conservative revolution in American government. A separate service was held by Bauman and others who wanted to remember Dolan for all that he was. The Washington Post accurately reported the cause of death, and later ran a long article about Dolan's homosexuality. The conservative activist's family and straight friends were furious. His brother Tony Dolan (a noted Reagan speechwriter) even took out a two-page ad in the Washington Times insisting that Terry Dolan was not gay. What can we make of a person whose personal and political lives seem so contradictory? Many would settle for a simple answer—Dolan was a self-hating homosexual who never became comfortable with his sexual orientation and expressed his discomfort by trying to hurt all gays and lesbians. But the truth is probably more complicated than that, There is no inherent "gay posi- tic-n" on issues such as military spending or taxes—and an individual, regardless of his or her sexual orientation, who feels that conservatives are right on such issues may find themselves having to face the same challenges Dolan did. Bui then, they find themselves in bed (politically, at least) with a Ronald Reaganor a Jesse Helms, and the conflicts between advancing causes they believe in and maintaining dignity as a gay person become almost insoluble. Given the slow response to the epidemic from the administration he helped put in place, Terry Dolan's death from AIDS made for a final irony in a life full of paradox. David Bianco, M.A., teaches gay and lesbian history at the Institute of Gay and Lesbian Education in West Hollywood. The author of Modern Jewish History for Everyone, he can' be reached care of this publication or through his E-maii address: ArtBianco- ©aol.com . No Access Restrictions rainbow-classifieds.com Q1995, American Heart Association 22 HOUSTON VOICE/DECEMBER 27, 1996
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