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Houston Voice, No. 844, December 27, 1996
File 012
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Houston Voice, No. 844, December 27, 1996 - File 012. 1996-12-27. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/915/show/893.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1996-12-27). Houston Voice, No. 844, December 27, 1996 - File 012. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/915/show/893

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 844, December 27, 1996 - File 012, 1996-12-27, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/915/show/893.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 844, December 27, 1996
Publisher Window Media
Date December 27, 1996
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript COLUMNIST Rainbow Reader By JULIE DEVLIN Tom Meeker is a rookie priest who's been assigned to the nondescript rural parish of Cottonwood, Montana. Tom's work is pretty routine, in fact, downright boring, until Vidal Stump, a local hiker half-breed with a reputation for troublemaking shows up at the church one hot Saturday evening to confess. Thus begins Patricia Nell Warren's torrid gay classic, The Fancy Dancer , recently reprinted by Harper Press. Tom is attracted to Vidal from the moment he sees him, but unable to process this forbidden attraction, he tells himself his interest is purely professional. After all, Vidal's propensity for trouble is well known in the town, and to convert him would be a definite coup for the young priest, who is still regarded with suspicion by both his head pastor and the leading citizens of this small town diocese, one of whom has sworn vengeance on him for not supporting her efforts to ban "obscene" books from the high school library. Vidal of course, makes no excuses for why he's suddenly become interested in the church. For, in spite of an obvious wife and child, Vidal is gay. He is also in love with Father Tom, and has been from the moment he first saw him. Since Tom isn't about to show up at any of Vidal's favorite hangouts, Vidal decides the best way to proceed is to show up at Tom's church, for confession and "counselling." Ii doesn't take Tom long at all to figure out what it is Vidal actually wants. Tom it seems, wants it to, but it scares him lo death so he tries to tell himself his feelings are just friendship. Next he tries to pass them off as brotherly love, and finally he simply tries to tell himself their wrong. Nothing, however, works, a'nd before long Imti and Vidal are lovers. In spite flf the fact that Tom loves Vidal wuh all his heart, and in s.ptte of ihe fact that he finds more happiness in the realization of who he is than he ever found in his religion, guilt eats away at him, causing him to indulge in all sons of bizarre behavior to stave off his growing paranoia that he and Vidal are about to be found out. Not even a foray to Colorado (ostensibly to attend a pro life rally, but actually to be with Vidal for an extended period, and to attend a meeting of Dignity, an organization of gay Catholics), help him overcome this guilt which is beginning to tear at his relationship with Vidal. Meanwhile, like something out of one of Tom's paranoid fantasies, the town book-burning terrorist has followed him to Denver, and has been shadowing him. Father Tom arrives home from his trip exhausted and more confused than ever, only to find her bitter accusations hanging over his head. Vidal meanwhile, tired of Tom's vacillating, and ready to leave town to finish his college education, isn't exactly being supportive of his lover in his hour of need. In fact, Vidal has decided he really doesn't care who knows about his sexuality at this point, since he's most of the way out of town anyway and not likely to return anytime soon. How Father Tom handles what happens next, and how he and Vidal resolve both iheir differences and their similarities, makes for a gripping conclusion. Wonderfully evocative of small town attitudes, the Catholic religion, and gay life prior to AIDS. The Fancy Dancer is a page turner from start to finish. Any gay person who's lived and loved in a rural area will be able to relate to Vidal and Father Tom's dilemma. Even though this story was written nearly 20 years ago, it relates easily to today and manages to ■-how simultaneously both how far we've come, and how lai we've yei io bo. Stein continued... it 'ontinuedfrom front page) ing careers - I don't if it would have happened." As a percussionist, you don't play very much. And counting is important, you have to count all these rests...so in the midst of counting, I am sitting there and I am watching the conductor and I am watching how one person can bring all these people together, how one person is bringing all these different musical voices together and make them a unified whole and obviously create something very beautiful and something very exofting. And in the midst of counting all my rests, that's when I said that's really special and, in my 15 year old precious mind, I said, '1 want to do that,'" laments Stein. Stein shared his vocational dream with his junior high school conductor and before long the band director let him conduct the pep band for the basketball game which "wetted" his appetite. "It was an addiction of the most positive sort," says Stein. By the time he was a senior, he was privately studying with all three of the conductors of the St. Louis Symphony. The first time he heard a symphony orchestra, in the sixth grade with his class was an experience which, he claims, opened his heart and mind to the real beauty of this art form. His primary goal is to attract the younger generation to the beauty of cultural arts. "We are walking a tight rope between trying to reach out in new contemporary ways - not just to young people, but to people who are young to the experience ol the symphony■- and the other side of that tightrope is falling into trying to reach to far in compromising the essence and beauty and the tradition of what this art form is all about." Stein believes the Symphony may have an answer. "We've started a program called Casual Classics," says Stein. The premise is interesting indeed and really quite imaginative. "Instead of a concert basically being a 2 and 1V2 hour performance with a 20 minute intermission, it is now basically about 75 minutes with no intermission," he explains. "I serve as the host. I'm talking to the audience," asserts Stein. "Christoph conducted the first concert, so I also talked to him and let the audience ask him questions. And, I went into the orchestra and asked them questions." According to Stein, the concept allows him to the let the audience into the Symphony's process and let's them reach oul more directly to the audience so that there is more of bond forged, more of a link created between the public and the Symphony. "Our particular art form is the most challenging. At the Opera, they can sing in any language in the world, all you have to do is look up and you know in English from reading the subtitles exactly what's going n. The ballet is so visually oriented and hen the story isn't obvious, their miming things. The Alley, of course, is a theater that speaks in words. And our art form requires you to sit quietly and, in terms of the visual activity, we are at the low end of Itancesj (Zrimlieb AND CoHee Shop \__W? A *76e 7U& %<vu* **__ Y fSf**l*. un yioms SALOON St^M (OpENiNq New Year's Eve) ^°»7 ISElfr YEAR'S EYE IfrlSbb iKEVER BE ^HE SAME! Come eat, dRiivik & pARiy 'iil you ckop! CoUNTRy MUSic ANd A qiANT dANCE FloOR & LiNdA Low SMirh's BANd! OUTRAGEOUS will bs pERfoRMiNq youR fAVORiTE dANCE MUSic All EVENJNq. I PARTy Favors! 0 BuFFet! ChAMpAqNE Toast! LivE Enterta'inment Satur-Jax, Jan. 4, 1997, 9:00 pr* TIie RoyAl, SovEREiqN ANd ImpemaI Court of iIhe StNqle Star PRESENTS Tke C\ay 90s Jkre. Still doing HostecI by Sieve CIiaIson, CANdidAiE Ion Emperor XIII, TIie BIacIc LeaiIier DiAMONd Emperor CANdidAiE BErxEliriNq Breasi Cancer Awareness jn Memory on Marion Panzer * 1100 Westheimer * 523-7217 * Qlejux l£ea&L &&*i cgr FREE Souvenirs to the First 500 People! c^= FREE Party Favors, Hats, Horns, & Leis! <M~ TRADITIONAL Toast at Midnight! C3° CASH Balloon Drop at Midnight! -3R FREE Continental Breakfast! Houston's Premier Party Place! NIGHTLY:Caged Heat/Men Houston's Lowest Behind Bars! Our Regular Drink Prices! Shameless Male Strippers! $1*25 Well / $1.75 Beer The Hottest Studs from all across $3.00 Call / $3.50 Premium Texas Strip& Strut for You! & $1.25 Schnapps! HOUSTON VOICE / DECEMBER 27, 1996 11
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