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Montrose Voice, No. 98, September 10, 1982
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Montrose Voice, No. 98, September 10, 1982 - File 001. 1982-09-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/8878/show/8845.

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(1982-09-10). Montrose Voice, No. 98, September 10, 1982 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/8878/show/8845

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 98, September 10, 1982 - File 001, 1982-09-10, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/8878/show/8845.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 98, September 10, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 10, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Know Me? I'm Your Cit Councir­person from Montrose George Greanias, interviewed, inside The Montrose Country Clogger~. perform ng at Kindred Spirits over the Labor Day Weekend The Newspaper of Montrose Issue #98, Published Weekly Friday September 10 1982 Good Evening 2 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 Graham's portraiture has been praised by leading publications, such as After Dark, The Advocate, This Week in Texas, and has received an award of merit for photography from the Dallas Morning News. His most recent award winning international exhibit is now hanging in the Profile Gallery Melbourne, one of Australia's finest and most pretigious galleries. Ir -GR-AH-AM- T-HE -PH-OT-OG-RA-PH-ER- St-ud-io/-Ga-lle-ry ,I I 4012 Cedar Springs, Dallas, Texas 75219 I Call Toll Free 1-800-527-5037 I Please send me _ copoes of GRAHAM at $28 50 ea 11 not dehghted, I I 1 may return the Book(s) w1th1n 1 O days 10< lull crad•t or relund tnclosea 1s my I check or money order 1n the amount of $ ___ (Include 5% sales tax 1f you I are a Texas resident) J understand the publisher will pay postage and handhng I Allow 3 to 4 weeks 10< dehvery I Name I I Address I I City State Zip I I Charge My Credit Card [ I I I I I I I I I l I I I I I Master Charge Visa Diners Club Carte Blanche I American Express Expiration Date I Signature I ~-----------------~ SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Deadline is Approaching for State Appeal of the Section 21.06 Ruling Dallas District Attorney Henry Wade, defendant in Baker vs. Wade, has openly stated he will not seek an appeal on the recent ruling by Federal Judge Jerry Buchmeyer, declaring unconstitutional Texas Penal Code section 21.06. This law proscribed consentual sex between adults of the same sex, making criminals of gay Texans. Texas Attorney General Mark White has issued no official comment concern­ing the issue as to whether his office will initiate an appeal to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans, accord­ing to Steve Shiflett, Houston board member of the Texas Human Rights Foun­dation (THRF). The deadline for an appeal or to file for a 30-day extension is Saturday, Sept. 18, and an appeal must be filed by Oct. 18 if the extension is granted, said Robert Schwab, president THRF. THRF selected the case of Baker vs. Wade to challenge the constitutionality of 21.06 and funded plaintiff Don Baker's successful case. "White may have to appeal the case," Shiflett said recently. "By historical prece­dent, every section of the penal code which has been overturned by a court has been appealed." Shiflett and others feel that this will jeo­pardize White's endorsement by gay polit­ical groups statewide in his bid for governor. Since White has failed to state that he would not appeal, and because of other factors, the Gay Political Caucus Sept. 1 issued a "no endorsement" in the governor's contest. Schwab said, "We're waiting for an appeal, we're prepared. If their is no appeal we intend to expeditiously and judiciously enforce the ruling." Many state licensing agencies have had clauses in their licensing procedures which would deny admission into a profes· sion or result in explusion of an individual if found to be gay. Additionally, police departments and other law enforcement agencies would not Don Baker be able to deny employment to gay indi­viduals solely on the grounds of their homosexuality, as a result of the ruling. Section 21.06 of the Texas State Penal Code was ruled unconstitutional August 17 by Judge Buchmeyer of the Northern District/Dallas Federal Court of Texas. It was a lengthy 52-page opinion and was in favor of plaintiff Baker on the grounds of "right to privacy" and "equal protection under the law." " ... This statute, 21.06, make criminals out of more than 700,000 individuals in Texas who are homosexual, although they do not choose to be, and who engage in private sexual conduct with other consent­ing adults," said Buchmeyer in his opin­ion. Stating the U.S. Constituional grounds of right to privacy and equal protection under the law, the opinion continued: "because if it were not (protected), the state would have the same power to intrude into the private lives and bed­rooms of heterosexuals and regulate the intimate sexual relationships of married couples, single males, and females ... " Texas is the 26th state to decriminalize homosexual conduct laws-or have them decriminalized by a court. "It's the first time a federal judge has ruled on homosexual conduct laws, using U.S. Constitutional grounds as a basis for his decision," said Schwab. "We plan to immediately enforce the rul­ing against any state action that discrimi­nates on the basis of sexual orientation," said Schwab. The deadline for an appeal or to file for a 30-day extension is Saturday, Sept. 18, and an appeal must be filed by Oct. 18 if the extension is granted, said Robert Schwab, president THRF. In the frist two weeks following the rul­ing, White was beseiged with letters and telegrams from religionists urging him to appeal. Baker was fired from his position as teacher for the Dallas Independent School District on grounds of the state law. He is current president of the Dallas Gay Alliance, serving his third term in that position. The case of Baker vs. Wade, a class action suit, was argued June 15, 1981, in federal court and a decision was due last August but was delayed because of Judge Buchmeyer's involvement in state redis­tricting. Schwab said that once the judge- ruled the law unconstitutional, the law is "off the books, even during an appeal process." Swedes Hope to Change Water, Wine into Profits Hoping to capitalize on America's craving for imported water and white wine, a Swedish firm is planning to export both­in the same bottle, reports Beverage Industry News. The concoction, caled " Zola," is a blend of French white wines and mineral water. It will contain about 2.25 percent alcohol. Montrose Mouth Leather and Sweat It's "Leather and Sweat" this weekend at the Different Drum as the American Leatherman Motorcycle Club celebrate their 6th anniversary. Rumor has it that there will be more than the regular cake and ice cream fare. The opening of presents could also prove interesting. -·- Houston Data Professionals regular monthly meeting is this Tuesday, 7:30 p.m., Holiday Inn at 4640S. Main, and this week's topic is " The Interactive Electronic Bedroom"-or "The Marriage of Computer Programming with Sex." "They say you can't go to bed with your computer but the speaker at this meeting wuill suggest that perhaps you can," they said. 523-6922 for more info. -·- The Montrose Chorale needs still more women, says Andy Mills. The first rehearsal will be this Wednesday, 7:30 p.m., at Bering Church. -·- Bring Gay Pride Week mugs to the Montrose Jam Saturday, September 18, as GPC will be filling the mugs because of that mixup at the Gay Pride Week Rally this year. The jam will be held on Pacific and Grant Streets 2:00-8:00 p.m. -·- Last Sunday, the band Automatic, on the patio at Mary's, had 'em dancing in the aisles. They'll be back this Sunday. -·- The summer re-runs of Dynasty continue Wednesday- with the big scene this week when gay son tells homophobic dad and the family to go fly a kite. It'll be on Channel 13 at 9:00 p.m. and it'll make you proud. -·- Heidi's & Company, a woman's store, will move to Kindrid Spirits Sept. 17. They wre formerly on W. Alabama. -·- MONTROSE VOICE staffers (to name just a few) were among those who were feted Tuesday night at the "official" grand opening of the International Club Chinese Restaurant on Westheimer. Gorging on a Chinese buffet, the guests quinched their thrist on a rather heavenly punch. The International Club- in the old SpiriVTeddy's Cafe building opposite Numbers-is now officially open, including the oyster bar. -·- The City Department of Health Mobile STD screening wants YOU-for a free check-up (including hepatitis) at E/J's, 1213 Richmond, 5:00-9:00 p.m. tonight (Friday) or at Midtowne Spa, 3100 Fannin, 9:00 p.m.-1 :00 a.m. Sunday. -·- The big clothing clue for gay men in the 20s and 30s was a red necktie. That little tidbit comes from Pat Franklin at Stonewall Features. Thanks, Pat. 4 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 . . . . . . . • • • •• • • •• •• • • • •• •• • • • •• • • • • • •• •• • • • •• • • • • • • • •• • • •• • • •• •• • •• • • • • •• • • • •• • •• • • • • •• • •• • • •• • • • •• • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • •• • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • ••• •• • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • •• • •• • •• • •• • •• • •••• ••• ••• ••• ••• ••• •• :···~:::::: 1 Year Ago Sept. 10, 1981: Two women get probation for Montrose burglary Two sisters convicted of stealing $1500 in silver items from a Montrose house with the apparent aid of a deputy constable received 10 years probation for burglary. Shiela Lister Froberg and Mary Carol Lis­ter were sentenced by state District Judge Thomas Routt for the January burglary in the 3700 block of Mt. Vernon. Sept. JO, 1981: Bill ends "Dan White defense" ~alifornia Governor Jerry Brown signed mto law a measure to abolish the legal defense of "diminished capacity," to end what he called "ridiculous outcomes" of crim­inal trials such as Dan White's manslaugh­ter conviction for the killings of San Francisco Mayor George Moscone and gay Supervisor Harvey Milk. Sept. 13, 1981: Gay murder prompted protests in San Francisco The stabbing death of a 31-year-old tourist in by an assailant who leaped out of a car and ~ccording_ to witnesses, asked first if the vie'. t';Dl :ind his companion were gay enraged the city s homosexual community. Nicholas Ritus of Seattle was stabbed almost two dozen ti_mes. A friend, Barry Mabus, 34, also a tounst, was stabbed once in the back when he tried to come to the aid of his companion. Montrose Voice The Newspaper of Montrose 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright • 1982 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg publisherltKlitor Johannes Stahl news editor Billie Duncan entertammenllsporra editor Ed Martinez new.s Nick Fede reviews Acel Clark graphics Wiiiiam Marberry 1dvert1smo dlf&etor David Petluck advt1rt1slng Lyt Harris advertising Gene Oliver adv•rt1smo Gene Nygaard advertising Chuck Oberg Dallu 1d11ert1smo (21<) 526-7893, 641 -3370 Founding Member· Gay Press Association Ntwt Services: I nternatlonal Gay News Agency, Pacific News Service .Au.stm Bureau: Cep1tol News Service Syndicated Feature ServicH & Wnter&· (San Francisco) Chro­nic le Features, United Feeture Syndicate, Jeffrey Wilson, Randy Alfred. Stonewall Features Syndicate, Brian McNaught POSTMASTER: send address corrections to 3317 Montrose #306. Houston, TX 77006 Subscnptlon "'" /n US. $49 per year (52 Issues). $29 per six months (26 1uues). or $1 25 per week (less than 26 issues). Nt1t1on1/ 1dvert1sing representative.· Joe OiSebato, Ri\l&ndell Marketing, 666 6th A\lenue. New York 10011 . (212) 242·6863 Advertising deadline. Tuesday. 5:30pm. for 15'ue released Fri­dey 8\lenmg Notice to advert1ser1: Advertising rate schedule Five-A will go into effect Oct. 1, 1982 SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 / MONTROSE VOICE 5 Psychologist Treating Kaposi's Sarcoma Patients Contracts the Disease Himself By Konstantin Berlandt Via Gay Prees Aosociation Wire Service Psychologist and former Director of San Francisco's Operation Concern Dr. Paul Dague has Kaposi's sarcoma. For the last nine months, he has been working with the Kaposi's Sarcoma Clinic of the University of California at San Francisco (Medical School). He interviews intake patients for the program. Several weeks ago he discovered that he, too, had contracted the dreaded but rare form of cancer spreading disproportionately through the gay male community. The rumor spread through the gay com­munity faster than the di,aease itself. A doctor who was treating gay victims of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) now has it. But Dague called any connection between his treatment of KS patients and contracting the disease "the widest absurdity." "To begin with," the doctor says, "because I'm a psychologist-not a physi­cian.': He had 15-30 minute interviews with incoming entrants to the KS research program, talking without touching. Dague says he could more easily have caught it at the baths he went to once in fhe last two and one-half years "for one night." Beyond that, Paul maintains, "I know everybody I've .. . with in the last two and one-half years. We're still friends. And none of them, to the best of my knowl­edge, have had sex with anyone who had KS or pneumocyetis pneumonia." .Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) is another viral disease that lately has been the frequent and often fatal atacker of gay men, although both PCP and KS are also attacking other groups and in grow­ing numbers. Dague calls himself the "least likely candidate" to contract KS when he com­pares himself to generalizations released by the federal government's Communica­ble, ·Disease Center in Atlanta, profiling the average candidate. He deasribes himself as a relatively mild-mannered homosexual when com-pared to the ravagingly promiscuous who turned up so often in the Atlanta-collected early statistics, that may, like early elec­tion returns, turn out to be wrong in the end. "The evidence in inconclusive," Dague says. The best guess from what evidence is available is that KS is "probably sexually transmitted," but the truth is, Dague freely admits, "We don't know." He criticizes the federal government for not putting more money into researehing the deadly disease. To get any research funds, he says, "was like pulling teeth until 20 percent of the people who had it were straight." Paul was very optimistic his tumor was going away. Discovering a cyst behind his left ear lobe about six weeks earlier, he had at first been thankful it hurt, since, tradi­tionally, KS lesions do not. But when Dr. Mark Conant, co-director of the UC KS Clinic, biopsied the cyst on June 21, it turned out to be KS after all. There would be telling his patients. He requested a week and a half before publi­cation of this interview so he could. Some of them he feared he might lose as clients, or at least distress-not only from such fear of the disease as sent rumors flying last month that some KS doctor now had it, but also because most of his patients come to him for their own problems, not expecting to encounter his. But overall he feels the disease "has made me a much more compassionate therapist," especially with the KS patients he continues to see and tells them imme­diately he also has KS. "I'm just like you." He adds that for both patient and psychol­ogist, an "awful lot of bullshit is cleared out when you're looking at the grim reaper." He credited earlier signs of cure to Conan at the UC clinic, his homeopathic doctor, several good books in the field of physio-psychic health, hia new regimen of rest and good food to restore his immune system to what it should be, exercise, mas-sage, and his own self-therapy to restore emotional and spiritual health. Dague's mother died from cancer six years ago. He thinks he might have inher­ited a weakenss for cancer. And although he has led "a pretty clean" life more recently, he pointed out that one's immun­ity system is assaulted by everything from sunburning to getting tired, to sugar, refined starches, coffee and stress. Dague says he is using the energy of his anger "to work in the healing process." Anger over his life being threatened turn into "visualizations for healing." He also plans to consult a psychic. He quickly cautions his own prescrip­tion of aleapathic-homeopathic-psychic­emotional- spiritual cure would be more impressive "if I Jive another 20 years." Unfortunately, the day after this inter­view, Dague discovered new lesions and is now planning to begin an interferon treat­ment program. He still recommends such a combined discipline cure as he continues to seek "more positive energy and removing stress from my life." "For some reason yet unknown, we're the first group hit by it. One can hypothes­ize forever," Dague said. "People who don't like gay people will use the reality of KS in very negative ways." He is upset by those who would jump to the conclusion Dr. Dague himself con­tracted KS through his proximity with other cases of the disease. Dague says the closest connection he can imagine would be some sort of psychosomatic magnetiz­ing effect through fear he might get it, or an overindulgent empathy. Like anyone working with an unknown vectored disease, he admits that while working with the Kaposi's Sarcoma Clinic he, of course, had such fears as many have these days: Could I be next? In Dague'a case, it just so happens, he was. 6 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 HPD says HPOA petition will not affect hiring policy By Johannes Stahl "Houston Police Department's policy (in respect to hiring gay recruits) is set by the city legal department and will be consis­tent with the law," said Public Informa­tion Officer Larry Troutt. (See related story page 3.) The Houston Police Officers Associa­tion (HPOA) has been circulating petitions which would seek to ban recruitment of homosexual applicants. Detective Bill Elkin, president of HPOA said, "A number of officers in the department-a majority-are against recruiting gays." "We just feel that it would create con­troversy and chaos within the department if active recruitment of gays were done," he added. Troutt pointed out that HPOA "is a pri­vate organization and not representative of the Houston Police Department." He indicated that the chiefs office has not received notification of such a petition. He said the city legal department was still studying the decision ruling Texas' homo­sexual conduct law unconstitutional and its ramifications to hiring policies. Gay Teacher Wins Libel Suit International Gay News Agency A Healdsburg, Calif. teacher who became a symbol for gay rights has won a $10,000 settlement against former state senator John Briggs and California's Defend Our Children, sponsors of the unsuccessful Proposition 6 against gay teachers in 1978. Larry Berner, 42, now on leave from his job at Fitch Mountain Elementary, became a target and claimed $3.5 million for libel, slander and invaiosn of privacy because he was portrayed as a child moles­ter who was unfit to teach because he was gay. ·'I hope this case will set an example that gay people will no longer stand by meekly when attacked or vilified," Bemer said. "We will not hesitate to use the courts to protect ourselves from this type of vicious slander." The attorney representing Briggs, Edward J. McFetridge, said the settlement did not involve "any decision on the mer­its of the case." McFetridge said that the liability insurance carrier for Briggs decided to agree to the $10,000 as a cheaper way to avoid the time, effort and expense of a trial and lengthy appeals. Reagan Accused of Double Dipping Pacific New1 Service President Reagan is an outspoken critic of officials who accept government pensions for past service on top of their present salaries. But it turns out he has been doing some double dipping of his own, and a civil rights group has gone to court to cut off one of his monthly checks. The President receives more than $20,000 a year in pension from his eight years as California's governor. The National Urban League claims this vio­lates an obscure Constitutional provision barring presidents from receiving "any other emolument from the United States or any one of them" during their terms of office. Says an Urban League spokesman, "We think it's ridiculous for him to draw this kind of pension when he is already inde­pendently wealthy and draws a healthy salary, too." TROPICAL nse IMPORTS * FRESHWATER FISH *SMALL BIRDS * LIVE FOOD & PLANTS * SET-UPS & SUPPLIES * PERSONALIZED SERVICE OPEN EVERYDAY (EXCEPT SUNDAY) 11 AM-8 PM 645·747Z 7008 WOODRIDGE DR. (NEAR GULFGATE) •sCOTT RED ERICKS 2011 SO. SHEPHERD 523-4193 523-4191 Scott Fredericks proudly announces that Ron Schubel, formerly of Haircraft, is now working here. r AT THE ~ lr~() \\VI~ 11:2 lr lti l~A\ lr 11:21~ ·---=============---· • A CONCERT BY lr lti I~ "'\ ~() N lr 11:2 ~u ~IE ~~"'\IV lti f() NII 1C ll3A\ NI[) • • • SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1982 a:oo P.M. TICKETS $6.00 & 7.50; AVAILABLE AT THE TOWER ~ THEATRE AND TICKETMASTER. ~ 8 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 il' l WESTHEIMER INTERIORS 1727 Westheimer •Houston 7L3/520-L357 Open 10 A.I'!. - 6 f.M .. Monday thru Saturday HOUSTON 1ST RUN 'THE DIARY' KINDREDS ti EXPRESS YOURSELF at FRANCISCO'S 901 Richmond with JERRY'S INFLATION Fl&HTER PRICES HaircuVblowdry or haircut & set, $10 Permanent waves $35 men or women 523-0438 A CLUB FOR WOMEN AND THEIR FRIENDS Live Entertainment weekdays 5 :30 • 8:00 Happy Hour, Monday thru Friday 5 :00 · 7 :00 Cherry Wolfe, D.J . Appearing Thursdays thru Sundays Pool Tournament every Monday 8 :30 winner takes all 1 at Monday of every month Free C & W Dance Lessons 8 :00 Last Sunday of every month C&W Night, featuring the Mustang Band 7 :00 • 11 :00 SECURITY I NO COVER (l .D . required) 5245 Buffalo &~way Houaton, Texaa 7700& 71 3/11115· ~7 1HI For six centuries, witches have withstood fear, misunderstanding and persecution. We have developed spells, potions and meditations that have helped us to survive and to be proud. a.ell, Book and Candle otters a wide variety of candles, incenses, potions, books, cassettes and classes, plus personalized instruction that have helped many to stand tall and to be happy. You are invited to stop and browse, to ask questions and to pick up a free love spell. We accept Visa & MasterCard. Our Price $250 Our Price $275 Our Price $700 Reg. Retail $700 Reg. Retail $550 Reg. Retail $1400 FREE! Every custom designed piece includes ~:iI~~~~J~~·;rry~ ~ I Call 680-5579 7128 Long Poin1 Rd. ¥ ¥ ¥• ¥¥¥- ¥ ¥ lf. GRANT STREET STATION Barbecue Saturday, 3pm $1 per person 2377 Grant at Fairview 528-8342 A People Place NOW OPEN AT lAM KRAZY HOUR T-SHIRT NIGHT for Cocktails with Lulu 7 days a week. 9-10pm, 75¢ Well Drinks Tuesday, with 25¢ Krazy Hour Prices Irish Trade Unions Issue Gay Rights Pledge By Lindsay Taylor International Gay New• Acency The Irish Congress of Trades Unions this summer overwhelmingly passed a motion in support of current moves to repeal anti­gay legislation in Ireland (Eire) and Brit­ish administered Northern Ireland, at their annual conference. The full text of the July 9 motion read: "That this conference supports the decriminalization of homosexual behav­ior between consenting male adults in pri­vate, and as a consequence of such support urges affiliated unions to resist any attempt to discriminate against their members in employment on the basis of their sexual orientation." This is the first time that the Irish Trades Unions have publicly committed themselves to gay rights, and the large majority in favor of the motion is particu­larly significant given the strong historic links between the Irish unions and the Roman Catholic Church. The move follows the British govern­ment's statement that it intends to bring the Northern Ireland laws on male homo­sexuality into line with those in force in the rest of the United Kingdom. Presure is also being brought on the government of Ireland to follow suit, since the Irish laws are currently among the most toughest in Europe. Pollster Stunned by Public Anti-War Sentiment Pacific New• Service Saying he's never encountered anything quite like it, pollster Louis Harris says Americans seem to have developed a sud­den and urgent hunger for peace. Harris, writing in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, says, "The results are startling and simply cannot be ignored." Among his findings: 86 percent of the population wants the United States and the Soviet Union to negotiate a nuclear arms reduction agreement. A similar majority is in favor of an acutual agree­ment not to produce any new nuclear wea­pons. . And, by a margin of three-to-one, Amen­cans believe every country that has nuclear weapons should ban their produc-tion, storage or use. . .. Harris says the message for pohtic1ans is clear: 56 percent of the voters say they will vote against a candidate who favo~s an escalation of the arms race-even 1f they support the candidate on almost every other issue. Says Bulletin editor Bernard Feld, "The implications of Harris' findings are stun­ning. What is a scarce~y discer:i!ble tremor in 1982 could turn mto a political earthquake by 1984." Last Cup for Dr. Welby Pacific Newe Service We hope this doesn't make you too tense and nervous, but Robert Young has pitc)led his last cup of Sanka. For six years, the former star of "Marcus Welby, M.D." has been barging in on people, urg­ing them to calm down with decaffeinated coffee. Now Sanka is brewing up new commer­cials with less fatherly figures, like Joe Zebrosky, underwater welder, who says he can't afford coffee nerves of the job. Sanka says the change was made to present a "closer reflection of how consu­mer• see the inclusion of Sanka in their !iv~." * EXOTIC BIRDS *FRESH & SALTWATER FISH * LIVE FOOD & PLANTS *SET-UPS & SUPPLIES * PERSONALIZED SERVICE OPEN 10-7 DAILY OPEN 12·6 SUNDAY (CLOSED WEDNESDAY) ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS 526-6940 2011 S.W. FREEWAY (GREENBRIAR/ SHEPHERD EXIT) SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 OPEN Monday-Saturday llam-2am, Sunday lpm-2am Gay hours Monday-Saturday 4-7pm Rita "Poppa Bear" and Bird ------ 5731 Kirby, 521-1444 Parking in rear Sunday, Sept. 12-Tejas Band featuring Shannon, 8pm Hurray! Now serving mixed drinks Sept. 30-Ms. Lonestar Republic Contest-Female Only 10 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 ELECT A MODERATE REPUBLICAN McCUTCHEN "Use Your Freedom of Choice" Pol. Adv, pd. by WH Mccutchen, 2615 Waugh #207, Houston, TX 77006 Yes, It's the true Italian restaurant in town. You never had such good food since your last trip to Italy. The elegance and simplicity of the decor together with the friendly atmosphere is exquisite. Our 4-star chef, Luciano, will offer you the best specialty of our country. You will travel from Ve_ncie to Florence, from Milano to Rome, enjoying the different dishes of our regions. Anita will entertain you at the piano while you enjoy the evening. Open for Lunch and Dinner & After-Theater Late Dinner Special Business Lunch for Two: Salad; Pasta, Veal or Fish; Fresh Fruit & Coffee, $18.00 2907 W. Alabama, between Kirby and Buffalo Speedway For Reservations call 522-8852 654-4040 UNITED·CAB CO. Last Two Nights Sheila Caesar & Joe Thalken Friday & Saturday, Sept. 10 & 11 402 Lovett 527-9866 join Us for Sunday Brunch and Watch the Oilers Games on Color TV, Sundays at Noon Opening September 14 Karen and Lambert Tuesday thru Saturday beginning at 9:30 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 4-8PM Serving Lunch, Dinner & Sunday Brunch Epidemic of Cheating on Tax Returns Pacific Newo Service Squeezed by inflation and high taxes, Americans are now cheating on their taxes in record numbers. The Internal Revenue Service says it lost nearly $100 billion to tax cheaters last year, and that figure could reach $120 billion by 1985. The cheaters include gamblers, prosti­tutes and drug dealers, but the great majority work in legitimate occupations, from doctors to waiters. Dan Harris, a tax expert with the gen­eral accounting office, blames the tax­dodging epidemic on a breakdown in morality. "The moral fiber of the country is decreasing," he says. "People just don 't care any more." But University of Wisconsin Economist Edgar Feige says the governemnt, not the taxpayer, is at fault. Vietnam and Watergate, he says, helped nudge many citizens into cheating ways. Citing studies showing the number of Americans who distrust their leders has risen from 20 to 60 percent since 1960, he says the tax rebellion "may be just a symp­tom of a much broader social change." U.S. Distiller Worried About Dry Years Ahead Pacific New Service Stock up on the wiskey and man the s tills-the nation's alcohol beverage industry is warning we may see a return to prohibition. The reason: the Reagan Administration is moving towards total deregulation of the liquor trade. While that might seem a blessing to some, most people in the industry say they'd rather deal with one set of federal alcohol regulations than with 50 different state regulations. Douglas Metz of the Wine and Spirits Wholesalers of America says, "If the fed­eral government got out completely from dealing with the devil's brew, it would give the neo-prohibitionists a great opportun­ity. 0 Metz adds that 450 of the approximately 31,000 counties in the country are now dry. Despite what appears to be all-around opposition to the deregualtion, the Reagan Administration is still backing the idea. Government estimates say the plan would savemorethan$11 million a year in enforcement expenses. Box Office Bonanzas Lead to Bulging Hollywood Budgets The success of special effects movies at the box office this summer has clea~ed ~e way for a return to big budget movtes this fall reports the New York Post. ~o years ago, the $45 million. fiasco Heaven's Gate caused all the maior stu­dios to tighten up. But blockbuster hits like ET, Star Trek II and Poltergeist, convinced many stu­di~ s to loosen the pursestrings. Last ye~{ the average cost of a movie was $10 mi - lion, this year it rose to $12 million, and next year it's expected to at least dou~le. Jack Valenti, president of the Motion Picture Association of America, says stu-dios are feeling optimistic. . "Once you've got people standing m long Jines for one kind of movies, like the special effects genre, they'll stand in line for others," he says. " "Everybody jumps on the bandwagon. Just moved into Montrose? Need furniture? Reasonably priced furniture with character from England OLDEMGUSR FlJRNJTlJRE llJ8 w. Gray, SZl-9145 All Major Credit Cards Accepted professionals In piano moving, crating and climate storage, since 1943 302 E. Rogers St. 694-8956 Serving Montrose and the Southwest Area Bathtub & porcelain refinishing for Tubs. Sinks. Wall Tiie Call the Bathtub Genie 667-2724 SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 I MONTROSE Vorce 11 Playgirl Follies No show this week only. We support the Miss Camp America Pageant NOW OFFERING SUNDAY AFTERNOON & MONDAY NITE FOOTBALL Happy Hour Saturday midnight-2am Sunday noon-midnight Mon-Fri 4-Bpm Open 10am Mon-Sat, Noon Sunday A MONTROSE ALTERNATIVE Pink Elephant "Oldest & • - ~riendliest n:;;;J, m Texas" ~p : 1218 Leeland ~- • 659-0040 MSA WOMEN'S SOFTBALL PRESENTS VARIETY SHOW Tuesday September 14, 8pm NUMBERS 2 300 Westheimer $5 advance tickets from Kindrid Spirits Sept. 3 & 4, 9-10pm, and Sept. 11, 7-10pm The Barn Sept. 7, all day Dirty Sally's Sept. 10, 7-9pm Twins Sept. 10, 1<>-11pm Doub/a R Saloon Sapt. 11, 7-10pm $6 at the Door Your community newspaper i• s now one of the largest gay newspapers in the country > Serious local and national gay news coverage > Exciting Montrose entertainment and sports coverage > Tremendous circulation That's the Montrose Voice-The Newspaper of Montrose 12 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 Every Monday 25e Draft Beer e eoop S35 WESTHEIMER-HOUSTON•S26-2240 Music By Keith Shankle Happy Hour Every Day 7am-8pm Welconie to Our Grand Opening Largest Gay Latin Club in the Houston Area Friday & Sunday Show Regulars *Laura *Alicia *Rene *Giovanni *Ivory *Monica * Yolanda Del Rio *Baubles *Paloma Grand Opening Weekend Friday, Sept. 10 Disco & Drag Party 10:30 PM-$2 Cover Saturday, Sept. 11 Latin Band at Bpm Sunday, Sept. 12 Drag Show at 10:30pm 112 Price All Three Days to Female Impersonators Show Director Rene Paez Community Center Open Jim Flock and George Barnhart, staff members of the Fred Paez Community Service Center, on the front porch of the new center at the comer of Avondale and Taft, discussing plans. Posh Hollywood Gay Restaurant Firebombed Br Ernie Potvin Via Gay Pre88 Association Wire Service The popular Academy Restaurant and Bar in Hollywood was completely gutted by a fire bomb in the early hours of Sep­tember 1. The restaurant had been briefly evacu­ated six hours earlier, following a tele­phoned bomb threat, but the bomb squad found nothing. At 1:00 a.m. another call was received in which the caller said only one word, "Boom!" At 4:00 a.m., two hours after closing, neighbors reported hearing an explosion. A few hours later only the bare walls were left standing, following a fire which gut­ted the structure. The Academy was one of Los Angeles' better gay restaurants. The decor was developed around a military motif. Wait­ers and staff wore smartly polished mil­itary uniforms, and the famous menu carried dishes labelled, "The Admiral," "The Lieutenant," and "The Recruit." It was also a showcase room for talented gay and non-gay entertainers. Demonstrators Support Paris Gay Radio By Lindsay Taylor International Gay New• Agency A radio station in Paris with program­ming aimed at gay people, and called Fre­quence Gaie, has been given official recognition after a protest campaign that included 13,000 telegrams to President Mitterand and a demonstration by 3000 people outside the Ministry of Communi­cations. Frequence Gaie was one of over 150 "free radio" stations competing for air space in Paris during the. last year .. The situation became so chaotic that an mde­pendent commission was. set up to regu­late broadcasting in the _city and t_o se!ect 20 or so stations for official authonzation. Six days before the official announce­ment, the Cmmmiesion's recom~enda­tion not to include Frequence Ga1e was leaked to the press, although it wa.s said to be the fourth most popular station 9:nd was one of the few that catered to a specific minority. As a result, Frequence Gaie collabora_ted with all the major French gay orgamza-tions to arrange a telegram protest that swamped the post office, as well as a dem­onstration on July 20-the day before the Commission's recommendations were to be officially released. The Commission revised its findings and "cordially invited" Frequence Gaie to use the 90 Megahertz FM band for a full 24 hour day. The station will also receive a govern­ment grant to finance its broadcasts and pay the salaries of two or three full-time employees. Slow Food in San Diego Pacific news Service A San Diego woman says she didn't get up and walk away from her dinner-until her dinner got up and walked away from her. The Chicago Tribune reported the woman claims a local restaurant gave her an order of escargot, with one snail still alive and kicking. The plaintiff says she was "disgusted and distressed," ran out of the restaurant and fell downstairs-breaking her ankle. Do you hear "lawsuit?" You're right-to the tune of $350,000. Fast Food in Russia Fast food has come to Moscow-but it takes a long time to get it, reports the Times of London. The Soviet capital has its first pizza parlor-serving pies topped with tnozza­rella, pepperoni and traditional Russian her be. The reetaurantie eo popular that Musco­vites have been waiting in line for up to two hours for their first taste of Western fast food. Liddy Debuts as Television Anchorman Convicted Watergate burglar G. Gordon Liddy ie about to make his debut as a TV news anchorman, reports the New York Post. Actually, he will be playing an anchor­man in hie first acting role in a wilderness movie called The Outdoorsters. The role represents quite a change for Liddy, who eaye he was once ready to fol­low orders to assassinate newspaper columnist Jack AndllI'Son. SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 /MONTROSE VOICE 13 UNDETECTIBLI With your natural weave-you 're going to look better, feel better, and act better. You'll be a winner. And everyone loves a winner. What are you waiting for? I. SWIM in it The Hair Weavers, Inc. Houston Office 1200 S. Post Oak Rd.,. Suite 420 Houston, Texas 77056 (71J) 622-3290 Call our Representatives Call tomorrow for a no obligation personal interview. r----------------------- 1 THE HAIR WEAVERS I I Suite 420, 1200 South Post Oak Rd., Houston 77056 I I [ ] Please send free literature on rour hair weaving technique. I I Name II Address Phone --- ---- : City Staie --ZIP I -----------------------· Letters Reader Urges Gubernatorial Debates to Include Libertarians From Gayle Wakefield In 1980, being a John Anderson supporter, I was pleased that the League of Women Voters included Rep. Anderson in their plans for the presidential debates. This year, while by no means a Libertar­ian, I hope the League includes Dave Hut­zelman, the Libertarian nominee, in the planned gubernatorial debates. All viewpoints should be heard, and I think the voters would be well seved by including this added dimension in the debate series. Restaurant Owner Irate About Damage from Driver From Ron Bilbo and Tim O'Riley Tim'• Coffee Shop We would like to call attention to the per­son driving around in their Cadillac Eldo­rado Biarri tz. We didn't appreciate your hitting and damaging our hot water heater in the rear of the building last Monday afternoon and then driving off without even the courtesy of informing us about the accident. You were seen, and we are now waiting to see if you are the honorable person that you are supposed to be. Republican for State Representative Blasts Danburg, Democrats From Wilmot Hill McCutchen Republican Candidate for State Representatiue, District 137 I commend the GPC for resisting the seduction of Ms. Danburg and the Demo­crats who tried at the endorsement meet­ing to make it a blindly partisan Democrat rubber stamp organization. To preserve its clout, the GPC should preserve its free­dom of choice. Hostile candidates, like Mark White, should not expect the obei­sances of the GPC even if they have been anointed by the labor unions. Mark White did not get what he did not deserve, despite the frantic efforts of party hack Dan burg. My chagrin at being rejected in favor of Ms. Danburg is somewhat mollified by seeing how blatantly partisan some of the other endorsements were-particularly the infamous Democrat judge, Jimmie Duncan. And even though my opponent has been endorsed despite a record of inac­tion and betrayal, I will not waver in my determination to be a State Representa­tive this district can be proud of. My firm commitment to individual liberties is rooted in basic Republican principles: respect for the individual and the Consti­tution in defianceofthecultoftheomnipo­tent state. If electd, I will repeal 21.06 and I will define "moral turpitude" in state law to exclude victimless activities. Ms. Dan burg and her minions are no big obstacle. As she admits, the district is now 58% Repub­lican. Throughout the state, we Republi­cans are determined to make this the year we bring fiscal responsibility and prin­cipled government to Texas. Mark White and Debra Danburg will finally face the verdict of the voters-this is not a one­party state any more, and even many Democrats are dismayed at the slippery and foolish candidates they're stuck with. Choling an attorMy I• cr11<lal ta only an• v•ry Important ~rson ... you. At our lnltlal cansultatlan you wlll l.arn what I can do far you. Han•>tly. Canfld.ntlally. M. ROBERT SCHW.AJ ATIORNEY·AT·LAW 713/526·9139 14 M ONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 10. 19 82 8th Anniversary, Oct. 1, 2 & 3, $169 (based on double occupancy) Includes round trip air fare, 2 days, 2 nights, French Quarter hotel, round trip transfers, cocktail parties, poker walk, Cajun brunch, pins, trophies, banquet, and drink and discount tickets for bars, restaurants. DENVER WEEKEND 3 days, 2 nights, hotel and round trip air fare, welcome cocktail, many other special attractions. Hosted by Charlie's Bar of Denver. $249 based on double occupancy. Call for details. 2506 RALPH, 522-8747 MONTROSE TRAVEL WATCH THE MEN COMING OUT .ALL OVER MR. CLUB DALLAS CONTEST 9:30 PM THURSDAY 30 SEPTEMBER AT THE OAKLAWN TRANSFER lST PLACE ROUND TRIP FOR 2 TO a.us KEY WEST 4 DAY STAY 500.00 CASH , 250.00 GIFT CERT I FICA TE TO NEIMAN MARCUS, DINNER FOR 2 AT THE MANSION WITH LIMOUSINE PORTRAIT BY GRAHAM 2ND 350.00 CASH 100.00 GIFT CERTIFICATE TO UNION JACK TWO DINNERS FOR 2 AT RATCLIFFS PORTRAIT BY GRAHAM 3RD 250.00 CASH 50.00 GIFT CERTIFICATE TO HIGH VOLTAGE PORTRAIT BY GRAHAM TICKETS ON SALE AT THE CLUB DALLAS, FROM THE EMPLOYEES OF THE CLUB DALLAS AND AT THE OAKLAWN TRANSFER The Club Dallas 2616 SWI SS AVE. DAUAS, TEXAS 821"1990 . ..................... ., ................. . SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 Feature 'I have a good time working for the city' Councilman George Greanias Talks with t~e Voice By Johannes Stahl Councilmember George C. Greanias was elected to represent District C-which includes Montrose-last fall. He, more so than many other politicians endorsed by the Houston Gay Political Caucus, can attribute his successful race to that endorsement; he beat his opponent by a mere 842 votes. GPC picked a highly-qualified candi­date in Greanias. He graduated from Havard Law School in 1973. His legal and management expertise has led him to write articles, book reviews, case materi­als and technical reports. His writing abil­ity was further expressed by writing two plays: Wilson and Hello Hamlet! Since his election, Greanias has been very visible and accessible to his constitu­ents, including civic clubs and groups and to the gay community. He was selected to read the proclamation from Houston Mayor Kathy Whitmire for "Gay Pride Days 1982" at the beginning of the cele­bration, not at the very last moment as was the case in previous gestures from City Hall. Greanias is proud of his accessiblity to the public. The number of phone calls his office gets could be called staggering. The calls run the gamut from potholes to murders. He doesn't seem to mind; it's all part of the job that he says he enjoys. Why did you decide to run for Houston City Council? I grew up in a small town in Illinois­about 90,000 people-and my family had some political people in it. I had one uncle who was a Republican county judge. He was a judge for about 16 years and then when he retired, that very same year, another uncle of mine ran as a Democrat to be State's Attorney, which is like our District Attorney here. There has been a considerable amount of political activity by my family where I grew up. I guess I got that sort of sense that was something good to do. I pretty much geared myself to doing something publicly all along, and got a law degree, but after Iran the race in 1979, when I ran in that 13 person field and lost in the run-off by 50 votes, I decided that was pretty much it and got very deeply involved in teaching at Rice and opened a consulting practice. The spring of 1981, when I heard that Lance Lalor might run for Controller, I was so far from thinking of running myself that it took me about 45 minutes to realize that his council seat would be open and I might want to nm for it I felt that, by that point, I had picked up a fair amount of expertise in management, had a considerable amount of direct expe­rience in various kinds of problems that any business operation faces and felt I could take a substantial amount of that and apply it on the city side. Also, I felt I could bring a considerable amount of energy to the job and push things along that needed to be done. I felt the best thing was to be sure to be involved directly in a number of issues that are going to make or break the city. How instrumental do you feel the Gay Political Caucus endorsement and the gay uote in the election were to your uictory last fall? When you win by 842 votes, everybody and everything that was done was impor­tant. It's obvious that without the support of the Gay Political Caucus, I would not have been elected. I think equally obvious, without the strong showing we made in the run-off in the Westbury and Fondren-Southwest area, we didn't carry but we doubl~, trippled and quadrupled the vote I got m the general election. I wouldn't have won without that either. But I think even that speaks well of the Gay Political Caucus because one reason we did as well as we did in the suburban areas, is that we had a very vigorous mail out campaign and phone calling campaign. GPC volunteers formed a very large part of the group of people who were working. I remember a couple of nights during the campaign, when we were doing the big mailouts, and the most heartening thing I've ever seen was walking into campaign headquarters and seeing 55, 60, 70 people in a district council race madly stuffing envelopes to get it out in time. So, the people who went out and voted directly from the GPC, who followed the endorsement and those people who were willig to put time in it, were all instrumen­tal elements in my election. Were there any negative aspects of the endorsement? I think there were fewer than I antici­pated and that others who were working for me, including those in GPC, antici­pated. In partbecausewedidn'tbackoffin terms of the endorsement. The best evi­dence of that is at the Westbury Civic Club where I was asked quite specifically how I could say that I was for better police enforcement at the same time I was endorsed by GPC. The person who asked the question obviously felt that anybody who was gay didn't want police around at all which is not the case. I think it's the quality of police protection that was at issue. I talked about it from that point of view and did rather well in the Westbury area. Every­body knew I had the endorsement-it was no secret. I don't think that the gay issue was all that serious with a majority of the voters in the city. There are studies to verify this. I have fairly strong faith in the electorate and think if you face them candidly and you explain your reasons and your rea­sons are good, as "Why did you accept that endorsement?" or "Why did you seek it?"-you're going to get a fair portion of people to support you. I had good reasons for getting the endorsement and I think, vice versa, the GPC had good reasons for endorsing me, above and beyond my stance on gay issues. That involves things like my man­agement expertise and my commitment to certain kinds of programs to improve the city. One reason the GPC did as well as it did last year in terms of winning candidates, was that it picked quality people. That's a key-you don't run with a slow horse. It's the first rule of politics when you endorse people. Do you intend to run for re-election and if you do will you seek GPC endorsement? Gee, I should be real coy and say, "I don't know, it's too far ahead to tell." Bar­ring any unforseen circumstances, I cer· tainly intend to run again and I will seek the GPC endorsement. I hope I receive it. As Councilmember for District C, what do you feel to be the greatest problems facirw Montrose? I I - The greatest problem is preserving the integrity of an area or neighborhood. Mon­trpse has a very unique character. It's got a unique mixutre of lifestyles, of business and residential establishments and of land uses. Even the visual, it looks differ· ent from place to place within the area. Trying to preserve that is a very difficult process for a variety of reasons. One reason is the security problem. Although the crime rate in Montrose is statistically no worse than anywhere else, it is certainly perceived to be a very dan­gerous area of town. Unfortunately there are often incidences there, because of the way they occur or who they occur to, which gives rise and further enhances that image of violence. Traffic will increasingly become an issue for a variety of reasons. One is the problem of limited off-street parking. As more people move into that area, it becomes more urbanized and parking problems are going to get worse, unless we take some steps to alleviate it. Also, as the city moves forward on pro­grams to move traffic throughout the city more quickly, the Montrose area, because it's inner city, is going to face the constant dilemma of becoming a way-stop for traf­fic moving in. The question is to what extent do we balance the intersts of the Montrose area against the interests of the city as a whole in terms of moving traffic. One of the stickiest problems of the Mon­trose area-because it has the highest concentration-is the sexually oriented businesses. Massage parlors come to mind. Some people have problems with the book stores. I don't think anybody objects to them; most people I've talked to are more concerned about the flashing signs and the aesthetic image of it. What is council doing to alleuiate these problems? In the area of security and police, I think the first step was the hiring of Lee Brown as the police chief. He brings a managerial ability and a toughness to the department that it really needs. I think he'll be the first chief I've ever heard of who will essen­tially develop a plan for the department including specific goals of where it's going rather than going sort of pillar-to-post. If you think about it, one of the things the police department has not done over the last 10 years is evince any sense of direction. They always say they're behind in acquiring new officers, but there's never been a plan. Brown is putting that together. The council and mayor are both taking more serious of a look at the budget for the police department than the kind of sup­port it needs. This year we added a supple­mental item to the budget for civilianization, where we take officers from behind the desk and put them on the street. We've also scheduled overtime for the officers. Assuming these programs are success­ful, we'll expand those next year in the budget. It wasn't extremely popular in all sectors, because it included a penny increase in taxes. I believe people will sup­port that kind of thing if it yields officers on the street. We've also gone into a preventative maintenance program to improve vehicles and we've started buying a considerable amount of cars. We just approved the let­ting of bids for 60 more vehicles. This year, total, we will have well over 400 new cars for the police department. In terms of traffic, we are looking at an ordinance to deal with off-street parking. That's in the works and moving forward. When someone comes in and converts a house into a business, they'll be required to provide adequate off-street parking, not place a greater burden. We also need to look at to what degree are we going to allow residents first priority on parking in neighborhoods. Finally, we need to look at the possibili­ties of when a development goes into an area, and it creates a bad traffic situation, the city is the one which ends up havingto pay for those improvements and yet the primary beneficiary is that development. So we need to think about how we can charge more of a portion of that cost to the development. We're working on an ordinance on sexu­ally oriented businesses that will, I think, be comprehensive and defendable in court. It will take a wise approach that we're not going to get rid of them, what people do personally is their own business. But we can strike a better balance between the community as a whole and private action. That's sort of the theme of the ordi­nance. Montrose is deueloping rapidly with residential and business highrises. Do you think restrictions or euen zoning ordinan­ces are likely? I don't perceive zoning. I don't think it's a practical, political reality. However, the traffic improvements ordinance we dis­cussed, which would provide adequate off­street parking, is reasonable. I think it will come into play. When someone is trying to choose a land site, they'll be required to take into consideration the effect on their neighbors. Traffic on Richmond between Shepherd and Yoakum has been hindered by exten­siue road work. What are the plans for the street? For a long time there have been plans to widen that street. That plan was held up for a couple of years becuase of the 62 streets that would be affected. I took the position that in order to make Richmond a good artery, we need to finish that last stretch of road. It should be widened and have an esplanade, but since you're going to loose trees, you need to think about it and be sensitive to it. Public works, at my guidance, has come up with a new plan for this street; I guess this is the first public announcement. There will be a new street with an espla­nade and 250 trees will be planted to replace the trees that are lost. You can move traffic without destroying the neigh­borhood. In three or four years, when it's completed, it'll become a major improve­ment for the area. I hope it will be a proto­type of such projects around the city. Right now, I understand they're doing sewer work and if we go ahead with con­struction plans for next year, there's no sense to top it right now. In light of the recent decision ruling Texas' 'Homosexual Conduct' law uncon­stitutional, will you introduce gay right legislation before council? If so, what kind and when? We haven't even begun to think about that yet, because we're helping to look into current city policy to see where we might be in violation of the law, as it now stands 16 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 with the judge's ruling. I think that review is the first step. Until I know what we are doing and how this ruling by the judge in Dallas changes those operations, I really don't know what other legislation is needed, so I have to wait to see what the survey looks like. We are certainly looking at things like the questions that are asked potential employees and practices within the departments. Once we know how close we are to conforming with the law, then we'll see what more needs to be done. It's at least a two-stage process. I'm hoping at some point in the near future, that we can bring together people who are leaders in the gay community and form a small, informal group to solicit and deal with various proposals that might come up along those lines for specific action. What do you think about the possibility of openly gay and lesbian police officers? My feeling is that anybody who wants to be on the police force, as long as they meet the physical and intelligence require­ments, ought to be on the force. Candidly speaking, if somebody come to me and said, "I'm gay and I want to be on the police force," I'd have a long talk with them about wanting to be on the force at this particular time. Not on terms of any objection I would have, but whether or not it would be a wise decision for them with the kind of environment they'd be going into. My attitude is that sexual preference doesn't have anything to do with how well you can do that job. It shouldn't be a crite­ria for whether or not you're in the police department. There are obviously people who disagree with that. What do you feel are the advantages, if any, of placing low-income housing in middle to upper middle-class neighbor­hoods? Unless the project can be shown to improve the situation, without causing problems to the residents already living there, I have serious doubts as to whether it does any good. That is a social theory that grew out of the 60s, that complete and absolute integration of everybody no mat­ter what, was the answer. In our case it runs larger than that, even if there is some meat to that theory; the Houston Housing Authority, has not been a model for anybody. It has been a poorly ·M A Sunday: Beer Bust & Live Band, "Automatic," 5 till 9 R Y, Tuesday& VVednesday, Movie, "The Greek Tycoon" 1022 VVestheimer 528-8851 s run, poorly administered operation. Even the people who live in the projects have complained, and rightfully so, that they haven't been getting a very good deal out of the situation. How has council met challenges pre­sented by President Reagan's "New Fed­eralism" and cuts in federal aid? We are finding that people from a lot of programs that were previously federally funded are coming to the city to seek money from us to substitute for federal money. I don't think we're going to be able to pick up very many of those programs. We don't have the money for them and we have such a big need for basic city services that we're going to have to focus on that. I think where we're going to do some important things in terms of finding alter­nate funding for various kinds of activi­ties. We're going to have to get creative about the financing of tansportation; there is to my mind, not any money there for any kind ofrail system. We need to figure how we can finance it pretty much on our own. We've got a mayor and now a MTA exec­utive director who's committed to getting something accomplished and have accepted the idea that federal funding is not there and will proceed on alternate finanacing. That may actually make things move forward more quickly. What message do you haue for citizens in Montrose? If you've got a problem, give us a call. It's a simple thing but very important. I think that on a lot of fronts we're mak­ing substantial progress. There are changes that have been talked about for a long time and we're doing those. I think there are a lot of things that were never really considered before that we're going to try now. I really appreciate the chance to do it. I'm having a good time. I very much enjoy the work and the sense tht we are accom­plishing something certainly encourages me. I'm sure from time to time we're going to stub our toe badly but overall we really have a unique opportunity give the eco­nomic health of the city and the changes in leadership. I think that anybody who'd want a chal­lenging job, working for the city of Hous­ton in this new environment, could have a lot of fun. I'm certainly having a good time. TIB BARN Houston's Friendliest Country&. Western Bar Serving Breakfast 7:30-10:30am Mon.-Sat. StnrDAY: Buffet for MDA. KON.SAT: Open 7am. KONDAY: Barn T-Shirt Night & MSA Bowlers Night. ~DAY: Steak & Marguerita Night. WEDNESDAY: White Light'n Night. THURSDAY: Club Color Night & Pool Tourney. 710 PACIFIC 628-9427 Member Houston Tavern Guild & Home of the Mustangs Congratulations and Best Wishes to the American Leathermen on their Anniversary Club Houston 2205 Fannin 659-4 98 join Me ... The Water's Fine BC P,ur 11! l·,1n1.:<l .md dl'lt1r1rn:d Cont•· m:n1,li hl.u.~am1~1r) ''1th l'll·ltrifil·<l 1.".&ndi:l,1hr.1' JnL1al 'iolllll\\.OO<l and maho).:an' >mall >11c<l I kppl<·· v. huc ''~ kd !'>l'HC· tan boulr..c:Jw SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 3 DAY SALE lt.:.uurm~ Properq from the 'collection of GE'.\E T IER'.\E\ ' <Mrs. Howard Lee) fine Anuqut: Furm,hin~\ and Obfects of Art From a Courtland Place Mansion A Substanual C.11lenwn of Anuqut: Oil Parnunp Deacctssiont•<l from a Prcsu,:::mu~ Lvul Gentleman's Club J1..._/ - Important Collection of Antique and New ~~ This. our firs.t sale of the Fall Season, prom_1ses to. be a truh uc..uinJt cvt'nt I\ It includi:s an_ incred1ble amount of ~omt.' of the finc3t merchandise v.e ha"·e e\·er been privileged w offer at public auction. From such notable sources ~ lt..,teJ aboH, wHh adduions from other coll«tmm and local t-3tates. v.e have amassed a thrtt da\ aucunn qje fe.atunng such spe­cial ncms ~ a ra.r'e amiqut: v.alnut ladies' Carlmo ~t\ led d6k: a unique pair of serpenune_ ma.hogam­G~ ·orf:ian (h~b of drav.e~ cirn 18SO; oil pai~ungs b, ~uch nmeJ anms as fmil Carlsen. :'\.A., Ben,a.min F~~tcr. :\.A .. Rolw:n \\ c"td, G. Kock and others; a 1-tlttmtn'! "'O p1t:<.'1.: ~t of \\ atcrford Cf1Stal, a superb Philadelphia st~k<l "'alnut h1f;:hbl.>). circa 1s;o, a ma1tnifio:nt tau: (1curJ.:1.in \1:tpent1nt: linen press. a Shcffidd c;ih:er foottd rurnn and much, much more. Plca"f.' mal..e pl am hi ant.·nd ..,. hat \hould be a \'CC) special c..ale. AUCTION SCHED ULE FRIDA' f\ f:\11\G, Scprcmbcr IOth ...•.•.. ':10 P.M. SL'iDA' AFTER"IOO'i. Scprember IZth . . . . 1:)0 P.M. and cununuin~ SL \DA' AFTER\00:\, Seprember 19th ..•. IJO P.M. PR EV I EW THl R~DA', Seprember 9rh. . . 9:00 A.\I. rrll 8:00 P.M FRIDAY. Sept<·mbcr 10th ..... 9:00 A.M rill Sale Time SL\DAY, S.·ptcmber 12th ...... 11:00 A.M. rill S•I< Time SL '\DAY, 5eprcmber 19rh & llrh.11:00 A.M. rill S•I< Trm< WE DO NOT UIARGE A BUYER ·5 PREMIUM (Cmnplimentary cacaloJ:Ul"S a,·ai/able ac the door) Rart' anu<jue.: "al· nuc Quu·n Annt· sr~l&.-cJ U:rlron <It-• )IJ,rn "nun1: <lt..')k. Palace: iiz&..J pair of ~uzcndorf urn~; full n:ltcf floral <ll·· c:nrauon~ w·· ht. Pair o l \1t.·1'"'"·n ' "'""'" "" ""' "A Trusted Name serving Houstonlam r°" Over Four Decades." 2030 West Gray (near S. Shepherd) 524-2979 523-7389 18 MONTROSE VOICE/ SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 BRB Places Second in South­west Invitational Tournament Have it your way now with Tuesday and Thursday Night Beer Busts 9pm-2am VENTURE-N e 2932 MAIN ST. e HOUSTON By Billie Duncan The Brazos River Bottom softball team took a tnp to Tulsa Oklahoma last week to play in the Southwest Invitational Tour· nament. They not only played. out they played well, coming in second in a field of ten. Their hitting was led by Generoso Chang, who sent no less than six balls to homerun heaven during the tournament. B. Powell was smack dab behind him with a total of four goodbye balls. The batting averages for the team dur­ing the tourney were pretty impressive, with Bob Long leading the pack with a whopping .867. The pack was close on his heels, however, with all but one player bat­ting over .500. The lowest average was .489. Not bad. BRB started out the tourney on the right cleat when they defeated Dallas' Zapp 24- 7. Then they came up against Kansas City Cabaret and went down 6-2. Since it was a double elimination tour­nament, the pressure was on. Their third game found them matched with a team from Stillwater, Oklahoma. BRB marched ahead to the tune of 19-13. They kept on marching and stomped right on over the Tulsa Outlaws to an even sweeter tune of 19-8. By then, they were really on a roll. They faced the Kansas City Open Range and cooked them, 25-3. That put them in the finals. Their opponents in the finals were none other than the Kansas City Cabaret. You remember those guys who beat them in the second game of the tournament? Well, this time, the BRB team was pre­pared. They aimed their bats and smashed their way to victory. That was the first defeat for Cabaret. So, now each team had HAPPY HOUR 4PM TO 8PM MONDAY THAU FRIDAY FREE HORS D'OEUVRES OPEN DAILY 10AM SUNDAY AT NOON Brazos player from file photo. one loss. They had to play another game to decide who should walk away with the crown. The River Bottom was tired. They played hard and well, but the final tally on the old scoreboard was 16-10. In Cabaret's favor. But they still make it to second and that was good enough to put smiles on their faces. HOUSTON 2700 ALBANY 523-4084 SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 Sports Houston Takes a Broom to TROT Tourney DeSale said that since next year's series in Chicago will be 100% gay, he is thinking of having no non-gay players on the Dirty Sally's team at all, so that the team will not be disrupted if they make it to the By Billie Duncan The Montrose Sports Association bowlers swept up 22 out of 30 prizes at last week­end's Texas Roll Off Tournament (TROT IV). Prize money for the whole tournament totaled $4350. Although first place in the team compe­tition went to Dallas' M&Ms, all other prize money in that catagory went to Houston. In both doubles and singles, Houston walked away with the top three spots. The bowler who may have gone home the happiest was Chuck Rodriguez who took took home trophies and prizes for first place in the singles, second place in doubles with partner Jim Reagan and second place in team competition with Houston's Number One. Another shining face was that of Mar­tha Ritchie (president of MSA Women's Softball), who was on the number three team and took second place in the singles. Mike Steiniger and Don Housen won in all three events. And nine Montrose bowlers placed in two events each. Besides Ritchie and Reagan they are Keith Sher­wood, Steve McConaughy, Steve Ste­pleton; Paul Buenger, Nick Escobedo, Butch Irish and Dave Adler. Dallas won six awards (including the top team prize) and Seattle and Corpus Christie each took home a prize. Peter Intravartola of Seattle was the top bowler from the farthest away. At the awards ceremony later, he said, "I had a great time. I have a lot of friends here." Even if a person did not have a lot of friends before he came to TROT IV, he would leave having made them. Half the fun of the tournament was getting together with new people or seeing people from out of town who became friends dur­ing the last tournament. The tournament organizers had a shut­tle bus service that made regular rounds to all the bars picking up and depositing bowlwrs who were getting their arms in shape for the next day's play. When the play was over, the "play" con­tinued, with the Brazos River Bottom host­ing the troups for barbeque and country music by Ab and the Rebel Outlaws on Sunday. Endings and Beginnings for Monday Bowling MSA Monday Night bowlers will be pre­sented their trophies tonight (Friday) at 8:30 in the Magnolia Room of the Bismark Hotel said Mike Steiniger, MSA Monday Night Bowling League president. An organizational meeting has also been set to discuss the winter bowling league. This meeting will take place at 7:00 p.m. Monday, at Stadium Lanes, 8600 Braesmain. "All teams planning to bowl in the league must have at least one representa­tive ~t the meeting," Steiniger said. "There is limited space available, so call 960-1518 to make reservations." Bowling will follow the organizational meeting at 9:00 p.m. MSA Monday Night Bowling SUMMER SEASON RECORDS Top Team Overall- Galleon I (Roll Ott Tournament) Top Team Handicapped- Cherry Pickers (Total Pin Handicap Tournament) Division A 1 Daddy's 2- Eurotan lnt'I 3 Low•t lane Otvialon B 1. E/J'1 P't'n Splmt 2 Bu1hwacker1 3 5E .. yPlecet Divlaion C 1. Cock-Tellers 2 Citizen Pane 3 Slow Hand Division 0 1. Happy Trails 2 Galleon I 3. Gator-Aide High Team Scratch'Happy Tr1ila, 2750 High THm Handlcapped- 0-1 Leath« 3183 High Team Scratch- Tammany Hall 925 H1gn Toa., Garo• Hondlcapped-ltJtor~ ~ ........ Reagan/Rodrequez and Housen/ Irish, top doubles winners. Sally's Returns Dispirited from Gay World Series By Billie Duncan "It seems like we let the whole league down," said Jerry DeSale of Dirty Sally's. "If we had gone out there and done our best and lost, it wouldn't be so bad. But we didn't do our best." Dirty Sally's returned last Monday from playing in the Gay World Series in San Francisco. Out of eleven teams entered, Sally's ranked seventh or eighth. The first day they lost to Milwaukee's Wreck Room, the team that wound up in second place in the series. On day two (Thursday) Sally's squeaked by New York's Eagles Nest, 8-6. But on Friday, they said goodbye to any more play when they faced Boston's Chaps and ate it 6-2. The were chapped, to say the least. Herb Meunchow of Sally's cited the com­petition as a factor in their losses. "We kinda ran roughshod over the league here and people look at us like King Kong. But the other cities have strong teams that have played a long time." He added, "We have played some better games this year than we did out there. But the competition was very tough." gets involved in the community." Muenchow said that the Houston dele­gations have been in favor of the "80-20" rule which would allow a team to have 20% non-gay players, but the rule has not passed so far. "It's been close," said Meun­chow. series airain. · Good news for Houston fans is that the 1984 Gay World Series will be held here. Houston's exceptional handling of the Lone Star Classic this summer was a major factor in the decision. "We are anticipating about 20 teams participating by then," said DeSale. Despite the letdown of their World Series loss, DeSale still has a sense of pride in what the team and the league have done. "There was no team out there, I feel, that was any better than our team or the Galleon. We just didn't play up to our capabilities." Tennis Championships Approaching the Net Montrose Sports Association Tennis will hold its summer championship for levels one, two and three-as soon as 19 more entrants have been found. "As of this moment, we have 13 entrants," Rich Corder, president of MSA Tennis, said. "We'd like a total of32-first come, first volley." Monthly dues for the league are $5. There is also a $2 charge for guests who want to check out the league. Corder said interested tennis players could contact him at 524-2151 in reference to either tournament or regular season play. Glenn Burke The reasons for their losses were many and varied according to DeSale and Meun­chow. Said DeSale, "Part of it was that our season ended three and a half weeks before. We hadn't played anyone. We were a little bit flat. Also, the weather may have had something to do with it." Muenchow also mentioned the weather. "There was a big adjustment to the weather. It was awfully cold. We played in 48, 50 degree weather." Ex-Dodger Baseball Player 'Comes Out' He also blamed the physical layout of the field for some of their problems. There were no fences, and Dirty Sally's is a power hitting team that loves to knock them over the fence. So, all the outfielders had to do to make an out was to stand as far back as possible when a big hitter came up. "You can hit it a mile," said Meunchow, "but if the outfielders could get that far back, it was an out." Both Meunchow and DeSale stated that the absence of Vernon Harris hurt the team. Harris was not allowed to play because he is not gay. "He's one of the people who's sort of a spark plug out on the field," said DeSale. "Vernon is just a very, very good ball player," said Meunchow. "He doesn't make mistakes. He's very fast, so he's a threat out there on the bases. He also fita in real well with the rest of the £eam. He Gay Press Aaeoclation Wire Service Former Los Angeles Dodger Glenn Burke, profiled in the October issue of Inside Sports, to go on sale September 13, becomes the first major league baseball player to talk openly about his gay life. Burke, 29, a resident of San Francisco, was the 17th-round draft choice of the Dodgers in 1972, but played well enough to earn a berth in the majors by 1976. He was a popular figure in both Los Angeles' and San Francisco's gay com­munities, mixing his private life with his public career. But the pressure of a dual existence increased as he became more well-known, and in 1978 he was suddenly and unexpectedly traded to the Oakland A's "to give him more playing time," the Dodgers claimed. Burke and Mike Smith, author of the article, think otherwise. The~ suititest the Dodgers learned of Glenn's private life and, not wanting the bombshell in their backyard, dumped him. Candid state­ments made by some of Burke's former teammates seem to corrobrate the story. "By 1978, I think everybody knew," Davey Lopes, former Dodger captain is quoted as saying. The players didn't care about Burke's lifestyle-they liked him. "He was the life of the team." But the higher-ups, it is said, wouldn't tolerate an openly-gay person in baseball. Since leaving the A's in 1980, Glenn has been active in Black and White Men Together and, of course, in gay commun­ity sports. He's a member of San Francis­co's champion softball team, the Pendulum Pirates. The profile is taken from an anthology of gay black and white men to be pub­lished n.ex~ y~r by Gay ~UIUl~llE1; ~· .._. • ,• 20 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 Movies Garp's Not Sharp, But Woody's a Goodie &bin Williams in the title role, and though the actor is good, he does not domi­nate the film. This is probably not his fault, since he appears to ba ve subdued his usual flamboyance to become part of the acting ensemble. Rather, it seems to be a miscalculation by director Hill, who has placed everything in too low a key. Garp is intelligent and tasteful, but it needs a bit more friction to keep it going. By Dick Rogers Stonewall Feature• Syndicate The saying "Just because you're paranoid doesn't mean you're not being followed" might have been coined for Woody Allen. • The self-deprecating filmmaker has taken a beating with hislastfewfilms. Interiors, Stardust Memcries, and to an extent, Manhattan were accused of being deriva­tive, pretentious and self-indulgent. Now Allen has returned to a sweeter, simpler kind of film, but many of the reviewers are still not appeased. A Mid­summer Night's Sex Comedy is being called shallow, lightweight and deriva­tive. Beneath the critical barrage, one senses a note of resentment that the writer/ director/actor has not shown proper appreciation to the powers who made Annie Hall a super-hit. Allen seemed more embarassed than thrilled by all the hoopla surrounding his multiple Oscar win, an attitude that won him few friends in criti­cal circles. The squabble took on the earmarks of a full-scale feud when he lambasted fawn­ing critics in Stardust Memories. Considering the range of Allen's cine­matic output, it's odd that his recent work is measured against Annie Hall. Woody's valentine to Diane Keaton was no more typical of his work than What's Up Tiger Lily? or Sleeper. He uses a different approach in each one of his movies. Annie Hall just happened to be the one that became the most popular. A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy is another of his experiments-a warm weather confection that's both light and refreshing. A loose update of Shakespeare, it echoes the original without plagiarizing it. In fact, part of its charm lies in knowing ..~...-.~... . fiJ' ~ ~ the basic plot line and watching how gracefully the director assembles his three sets of lovers for a pastoral, though not so restful, weekend. Supplied with Allen's gently satiric and mildly ribald lines, the expert cast makes the film an easygoing delight. Sex Comedy is not one of Allen's funniest comedies, but it is a highly polished and sophisticated parody of the eternal mat­ing game. Allen's small group of actors works effectively in roles which seem more improvised than written. Especially effec­tive are Jose Ferrer as a pompous prof es-sor and Julie Hagerty as a sexually liberated nurse. The film is also enhanced by Gordon Willis' lush color cinemato­graphy and the classic Mendelssohn score. One of the secret pleasures of flimgoing is the possibility of surprise. It doesn't happen too often-most films are aimed too close to the center of public taste to take us off guard. But with filmmakers like Woody Allen, there is always a poten­tial for the unexpected. A John Wayne movie was always John Wayne, and Clint Estwood is always Clint Eastwood is always Clint Eastwood. But Woody Allen? What next? The World According to Garp is one of those rare films that is both blessed and damned by the integrity of those involved in it. Blessed, because the fimmakers obviously admire John Irving's best­seller, and have attempted to recreate Garp's world faithfully on screen; damned, because reverence for the written word seems to have paralyzed them. George fu>y Hill's film traces the life of T.S. Garp, a writer whose overriding pas­sion becomes protecting his family from the madness of contemporary society. llut Irving's sprawling novel covered three generations in multiple plots and sub­plots. In short, it was basically unfilma­ble. Screenwriter Steve Tesich has done an extraordinary job of translating many of Irving's scenes to the big screen. Where he and the director have failed is in building any urgency as the story progresses. One gets the feeling that the screenplay for Garp reads beautifully, but on screen, the scenes have a sameness that eventually dulls their impact. The material is clever, sensitive, humorous, and sad, but it sel­dom catches fire. What intensity Garp does have is mainly supplied by the actors. Glenn Close is a perfect Jenny Fields, a no­nonsense Meryl Streep type who refuses to compromise. Broadway actress Mary Beth Hurt likewise captures the inner strength and beauty ofGarp's wife, Helen. And John Lithgow turns in a hilarious and touching performance as Roberta Muldoon, Jenny's transsexual companion who was once a tight end for the Philadel­phia Eagles. But Garp pivots on the performance of The World According to Garp is one of those films in which the pieces are nearly perfect, but the whole is flawed. The dia­log, the acting, the crisp New England backgrounds-all are beautifully realized. But there is little sense that one scene builds from the last, and there is almost no clue as to which are the "little" scenes, and which are the dramatic highlights. Ironically, Irving's tale of madness and random violence eventually collapses from a lack of dramatic tension. •1982 STONEWALL FEATURES SYNDICATE Insurance Policies Stronger than Kryptonite Actor Christopher Reeve says insurance companies have done what Lex Luthor could not: turn the man of steel into a wimp. Reeve, now filming Superman Three in Canada, complains the regulations laid down by the company insuring the film "are a real drag." So far, reports Canada Press, they have prevented him from going up in a hot air balloon-or even driving his own car. "You can't do anything except walk," he says, "and even that they don't like. INTERNATIONAL CLUB RESTAURANT t t ~ 243 WESTHEIMER (in Montrose, near Downtown) Tel: 523-2795 A GOOD PLACE FOR YOU TO ENJOY "CHINESE LUNCHEON BUFFET" ALL YOU CAN EAT ... 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SAVE WITH THIS COUPON I : LAUNDERED Regular 95C : I SHIRTS Special 65C I II One I HOUR . 1 : ''fllAllTID/l/OG_" : I THE MOST ,;·~·~v CL~ANIN; I I I I Coupon expires October 8, 1982 I I COUPON MUST BE PRESENTED WITH GARMENTS I I (NO LIMIT) I I Good only at 1224 Westheimer location I L-----------------------J Kindred Spirits invites you to a and their new single "Without My Friends" benefiting the Montrose Counseling Center Special Guest: Debra Danburg Sunday, September 12 5:00 .. 8:00 p.m. 50e of each sale goes to MCC. 5245 Buffalo Speedway (713) 665-97 56 SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 BED HOUSE SALE! SALE! SALE! Simmons Beauty Rest Discount Center Kings, reg. $600.00, now s199oo Queens, reg. $400.00, now s199oo Full Size, now s12900 Other Sizes Available 2115 Norfolk, 10-7 M-F 10-6 Sat 523-8278 LAST BIG WEEK Exclusive Houston Engagement Fre'e Validated Parking Greenway Plaza Underground Highway 59 at Buffalo Speedway 626-3339 22 M ONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 FULLFILLMENT vs STRESS-PAIN-FEAR Hypnosis can change your life today. Rid yourself of nega­tive thoughts .and habits. Private and Group Sessions. James D. Kristian, Ph.D. HYPNOTHERAPIST / PSYCHOTHERAPIST 14 years of experience, co-founder of prescription Hypnosis and acceleration Therapy. We know Physical and Emotional Pain can be helped. YOU CAN OVERCOME Weight • Smoking • Fears • Anxiety • Guilt • Depression • Drug Abuse • Alcohol Abu~ • Anger • Loneliness • Stress • Nervousness • Pain • Problems YOU CAN IMPROVE Self Confidence • Self Wonh • Shyness • Memory • Concentration • Relationships • Love Emotions • Make Friends • Be A Success in Relationships • Sports • Business. We'll show you how! LEARN SELF -HYPNOSIS $250 CALL TODAY 977-2485 Need a Guest Speaker for your gro up? Call for information MEMBER HOUSTON PROFESSIONAL HYPNOTISTS ASSOCIATION D~naore's ~ ITALIAN U CONTINENTAL RESTAURANT Zl9 Westhelmer SZO·l864 A casual yet elegant experience for lunch or dinner. Our complete Italian and continental menu and extensive wine list will tempt and please you. Relax and enjoy the only balcony terrace overlooking old Westheimer. We're open Tuesday thru Sunday 11:30 a.m. to ??? Closed Monday. We Accept Major Credit Cards Orders to Go Private Party Rooms Parkins In Rear ,--- - -- - ----------~----- -- ----------- : FREE! VALUABLE COUPON FREE! Buy One Dinner at Regular Price Get One Dinner Free Excluding Veal, Steak & Seafood Dishes Free dinner must be of equal or less cost of regular dinner. Coupon expires Sept. 19, 1982. FREE! D'Amore's _____F_R_E__E_! __ _J Another Woman's Alternative 523 Lovett, Houston Maryanne Mahoney and Mata Hari Entertaining Every Fri. & Sat. Evening SPECIAL GUEST APPEARANCE MARTHA TURNER Sunday, Sept.12, 8to12 HAPPY HOUR 4-7 TUES-FRI WELL DRINKS 2 FOR 1 BEER 85¢ Live DJ 4 nights a week Marquerite at the piano for Happy Hour Wednesday-Friday We're open 6 days a week for your rinking & dancing pleasure (closed Monda (713) 523-3396 We wish to thank all our many friends and supporters who have stood by us after the loss of The Hole. The Hole will reopen in early October. THIS WEEK AT Ht.PPY TRAILS Happy Trail Riders Fri.-Sat. 9:30-1 :30 Dixie Kings Sunday 5-8 with complimentary buffet at 2pm Wednesday, Sept. 15, MOM presents the Dixie Kings 8-11pm A special benefit to replace Keoki Kona's keyboard organ lost in the fire at The Hole. MOM asks for the support of the community Join Dee every morning at ?am for 50¢ Amaretto and Schnapps Now open daily 7-7 for Happy Hour Saturday 7am-2am with drink specials Sunday Happy Hour noon-3 The Hole is hold ing court at the Happy T rails 715 Fairview 521-2792 SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 Dionne Warwick, Barbara Mandrell and Melissa Manchester Beautiful Women Making Beautiful Music By Jeffrey Wilson Barbara Mandrell {MCA)-she isn't just for country anymore. From the title track, "Why Am I Still In Love With You," and "SomeThingsNever Change," their gentle, pop-ballad deliver­ies let your ears notice that country music has become deliciously versatile. The hint of R&B rising in "Black and White" dominates "Getting Over A Man" and "Operator, Long Distance Please" with a plucky, mid-tempo styling much like Dionne Warwick's. " 'Ti! You're Gone" gives us a flavor with a modem Motown taste. And how about this-Ms. Mandrell truly gets soulful on "The Thrill Is Gone" accompanied by none other than the tune's originator-Grammy Award win­ning Mr. B. B. King. This is not an imita­tion folks. Neither is it a "shot" or loose attempt at "crossing over." We're talking about a very impressive, professional delivery at the top of the scale. Equal blends of pop, country and R&B with flowing background vocals produces a very nice "You're Not Supposed To Be Here." Sprite and lively piano also adds to this song's appeal. "Rolling Stone" is augmented with pow­erful acoustic and bass guitars. The lyrics are delivered with great feeling making this an impressive rock-type ballad track. 3012 MILAM • 528-6720 Some of the best tunes contained herein are written by Kye Fleming and Dennis W. Morgan. Guitarist Gene Miller gives a fine performance on the title track's duet. Packaging of this product is dramatic with outstanding cover photography by Mario Casilli. The silver-colored inner sleeve will provide the buyer with some of the best lyrics around this season. Sweet Melissa was once one of Bette Midler's outrageous background vocalists in the Harlettes. As most pop enthusiasts know, Melissa Manchester (Arista) has enjoyed many recent years as a true super­star through the magic of her musical writings and singing. Her newest production, Hey Ricky, is some of what Melissa does best and some very uptempo pop. That's Melissa singing the chart-topper "You Should Hear How She Talks About You." Another former Barlette, Ula Hedwig, sang background on this sensation as well as on some others in this album. In this powerful vein of pushing pop is the Bernie Taupin co-written title song and the Carole Bayer-Sager co-written "Looking For The Perfect Ahh." There are four ballads included that are just incredible. My favorite is "I'll Always Love You," which almost comes off as a duet as Manchester is joined in the back· ground by the song's co-composer Tom Snow. WOULD You LIKE TO BE A STAR? EACH MONDAY STARTING AT 9PM. THE KEYBOARD HAS OPEN MIC· PIANO POLICY. ExPERIENCE THE THRILL OF PLAY· ING TO AN APPRECIATIVE AUDIENCE AND ENTERTAIN YOUR FRIENDS AT THE SAME TIME. IF CHOSEN, YOU COULD BECOME OUR COCKTAIL PIANIST FOR THE FOLLOWING WEEK. ENJOYING EXTRA MONEY, EXPOSURE. FUN, PLUS TIPS. COME IN BEFORE 6PM ON MON· DAYS TO SIGN UP. OR SEE YOUR FAVORITE BARTENDER TO REGISTER. OPEN 2PM-2AM The stated duet on this album is shared with former lead singer of the group Bread, David Gates, as these two fine har­monizers deliver "Wish We Were Heroes." "Race To The End" (the theme from Chariots Of Fire) drives with compassion and motivation as Manchef!ter backs her­self vocally in timed perfection. Perhaps the most beautiful tune is the Gershwin brothers' classic from the 1920s "Someone To Watch Over Me." This is Melissa Manchester at her cabaret best, jazzy and torchy, and just right. Included from an earlier LP is "Come In From The Rain," co-written by Manches­ter and Sager, recorded by Toni Tenille and Diana Ross to name a few. This pla­teau collection will be around for quite awhile and the artist will really have to dazzle the public to surpass this project. Packaging includes some great portfolio photography by the famous Hurrell. Arista Records' other fetnale superstar is Dionne Warwick. Her new album reads like a musical Who's Who with cour­tesy credits going to Stevie Wonder, Michael Omartian and guitar great Steve Lukather, to name a select few. Warwick is joined by Columbia Records' Johnny Mathis for two superb ballads, "Got You Where I Want You" and the first single release, "Friends In Love." This combination of talent and vocal quality/ Hot Wax compatibility is astounding. "Never Gonna Let You Go" is another pretty ballad in the more recent style of Warwick's Arista success. The album opener, "For You," is light and airy with a crisp pace for starting the set. "More Than Fascination" (penned by Tom Snow) could commercially make it as a moderate single. The majority of this product is stuck in a groove falling short of a shadow on the heels of her successful Dionne and No Night So Long albums which brought this artist out of hiatus. Other than the tunes mentioned, War­wick is a talent much more deserving. How could she settle for material such as this after working with Barry Manilow and Steve Buckingham? As far as packaging goes, I understand Davenport's direction. It's just that David Vance's pictures don't quite make it. Dionne has spoiled us with those last cou­ple of fantastic LP's so this one comes across rather bland. Rocky Goes Disco Sylvester Stallone is reportedly working on a screenplay for a sequel to Saturday Night Fever, says the Chicago Tribune. The new film called "Staying Alive," will also star John Travolta, although Stallone is said to be thinking about writ­ing in a role for himself. 24 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 It Took Eve Arnold Fifteen Years to Get Inside China for Photography Expedition By Drorit Szafran Fifteen years-rather a lengthy journey in this jet age. Nonetheless, that's how long it took Eve Arnold, world reknowned pho­tojoumaliBt, to arrive in the People's Republic of China. "I had tried to go to China for 15 years, Arnold said, but with their lack of diplo­matic relations with the United States, it was impossible." Richard Nixon's 1979 visit to China changed that. China's new leadership, following their 10-year Cultural Revolution, r e­established diplomatic relations with the United States, thereby making travel pos­sible once again. Appealing to Chinese Embassy offi­cials, Arnold requested the opportunity to travt;. not as a member of a group with a 21-de.y visa, but rather, freely on her own. She presented her project to the govern­ment as " ... ameansoffurtheringWestem understanding of contemporary China." Within 3 days, the visa was granted. Arnold made two trips to China in 1979. The first, lasting two months, was during the Chinese winter and included the more familiar places: Peking, Canton, Shanghai, and Chungking, as well as a week on the Yangtze River. The second trip, lasting three months, was more complicated. Taking in places not normally visited by foreigners, Arnold logged over 40,000 miles across the interior of China from Singkiang, not far from the Russian border, in the northwest; to Hsishuang Panna, on the Burmese border, in the deep south; to Tsingtao on the east coast; to Inner-Mongolia and Tibet. "My goal was to clear up the misconcep­tions and stereotypes, and make a photo­graphic statement about the lives of the people." "I wanted to get beneath the surface and beyond the endless blue 'Mao suits' and bicycles we've been seeing pictures of for so many years." Actually, the "Mao suit" is a misconcep­tion. Sun Yat Sen, the "Father of the Chi­nese Revolution," originated it for efficiency and economy. Most Chinese, in addition to the blue suit, do wear vivid colorful clothing and native dress. There were many changes that occurred between the winter and summer of 1979. Upon her arrival, Arnold found the Chi­nese people in a euphoric state, literally dancing in the streets. Americans were highly prized by them and treated " wond­erfully." By summer, the Chinese, though still happy to see the Americans, were more subdued. Their euphoria had vanished, as did the dancing in the streets. While still treated with kindness and respect, Ameri­cans were now common-place. "An interesting thing, Arnold said, is -- L.I t that when I first arrived, the people were writing their feelings on billboards near the Great Wall of China. By the time I returned, there were advertisements for heart medication and Lucky Cola in their place." Whether traveling by plane, ship, car, train, bus, jeep or on foot, Arnold's idea wasn't simply to photograph and observe, but rather, to talk to the people and inter­view them. These interviews took her directly to the people, wherever they were to be found. Her visits included factories and com­munes, movie sets and radio stations, mil­itary outposts and palaces, as well as the private homes of people. "I entered everything from a cave built into the side of a hill below road level in Sian, to a bookkeeper's home outside of Peking, to a barefoot doctor's dwelling in Tibet. (Barefoot doctors are sometimes barefoot, and tend about 90% of the sick, much like American paramedics, through­out China, Inner-Mongolia and Tibet.) "I even got to visit a mayor and his depu­ties, a Shanghai millionaire (yes, they still 522-8227 Windjammer Cruises Houston Departures Thanksgiving-Nov. 21 -27 Christmas-Dec. 20-27 Call for Details Serving the Gay Community exist), a representative of the People's Congress, Vice Chairman Liao (who had gone on the "long march"), and Madame Chiang Kai-shek." "Madame Chiang Kai-shek was in her 70s when I met her, a beautiful and gra­cious woman who loved her people." Contrary to popular thought, reli~on still exists in China. There are 56 separate languages and minorities, making up six percent of the population-roughly 60 mil­lion people. The government has undertaken the restoration of old and damaged Buddahs, smashed during the Revolution, as well as the creation of new Buddahs. While some of the Buddahs are housed in temples, others are part of museum col­lections. "It is quite a sight to see military officers standing along-side monks admir­ing the Buddahs." "The Chinese have a great love of art. In fact, they have been using Michaelange­lo's "David" to teach their drawing classes. Imagine, future propaganda pos­ter painters are being taught to draw using such a masterpiece." NEVER A COVER CHARGE Another incongruity is the Chinese beer industry. When the travel restrictions were lifted in 1979, the West Germans decided to bring beer to the Chinese. They taught the Chinese how to brew the beer, and even supplied the necessary hops. Now, three years later, the Chinese have a thriving beer industry-one that exports heavily to West Germany. In addition to her vast travels within China, Arnold also spent considerable time in Inner-Mongolia and Tibet. "I knew that l'd love China, Arnold said, but I had expected Tibet to be the high point of the trip. That didn't tum out to be so. While Tibet was the peak, Inner­Mongolia was really the ultimate peak." While in Inner-Mongolia, Arnold was permitted to photograph military maneuvers in progress. There, women as well as men, were being trained along with their horses. "It was amazing to see a trained militia horse remain perfectly still while a 16 or 17-year old girl lay flat on her stomach shooting, resting her rifle on the horse's chest." "Though there is little expectation that a girl on horseback, armed only with a rifle, can combat a Russian tank, there is a feeling of readiness that is radiated." Just as there are cowboys in the United States, there are also Chinese and Tibetan cowboys. They just look slightly different. Like their American counterparts, Oriental cowboys tend horses. Unlike American cowboys, they also tend yak. In Tibet, the government has funded the building of permanent houses, rather than tents, for the cowboys, so as to allow their children to regularly attend school. Using bamboo poles with hooks to round up horses and yak, the cowboys ride along the range under clear blue skies. "You can see for miles in Tibet and China because there is no pollution. The skies, as well as the waters, are perfectly blue." While in China, Arnold amassed hundreds of photographs, along with countless interviews and reflections. These became the basis of her best-selling book, In China, published in 1980. That book, in turn, spawned the exhibi­tion "In China: Photographs By Eve Arnold," currently on display in Houston, at the Museum of Fine Arts until October 24. China isn't a bleak and boring country made up of faceless masses. It is mystical, in addition to being bright, beautiful and diverse. It has beaches, modem citys­capes, legal abortions, once-a-month birth control injections, and close family ties, despite the advent of the commune. There is laughter and humor, Chinese­manufactured televisions, and political, romantic, or melodramatic films in full ­color. There are young girls with straight black hair having permanents put in. Even haute couture has hit Peking­Pierre Cardin now displays his newest fashions in front of the Great Wall of China. Sunday, Sept. 12 8-lOpm John Day & Company Tuesday: Steak Night Thursday: Pool Tournament lOpm Movies nightly on the patio OPEN 7 AM-2AM 1213 RICHMOND 527-9071 Extra parking on the comer of Mt. Vernon & Richmond NEVER A COVER CHARGE SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 25 Montrose Art Chinese Photograph Exhibit at Museum of Fine Arts By Drorit Szafran If a picture's worth a thousand words, then the exhibit, "In China: Photographs By Eve Arnold," currently on display at the Museum of Fine Arts, must be worth a soliloquy. Comprising 104 photographs taken in 1979 on her 2 visits to China, Inner· Mongolia, and Tibet, Arnold has man· aged to convey a sense of innocence and tranquility in her portraits of a people. Concentrating heavily on faces, she has transcended the confines of her camera, and allowed us a rare and intimate glimpse of one of the world's oldest cul­tures. The "flavor" of the exhibit is estab­lished from the very first photograph-a remarkable shot of a retired Szechuan worker. Capturing a face that radiates warmth and wisdom, the photograph sets the mood for the ensuing 103. Ironically, this photograph was a fluke. Arnold was photographing a crowd scene and this woman just happened to be a part of it. "I didn't set out to focus on her face, Arnold said, or feature her specifically­that came about when I viewed the deve· loped film." Arnold saw a beauty and dignity. as well as a warmth and wisdom etched into the lines of her face. The appeal was uni· versal. Her secret fantasy, she says, is to return to China and locate the woman. "She's come to mean quite alot to me­afterall, she's the opening shot of this exhibit, as well as the cover of my book. I doubt seiously, though, if I ever will." That book, In China, published in 1980, was the foundation upon which the exhibit was built-that, and a sponsor· ehip from the Exxon Corporation. Arnold's photographs make good her claim that China is "no land of faceless masses." There is quite a broad spectxum of faces-ranging from the "traditional" Chinese face to off-white, brown, black, and red Chinese, Mongolians and Tibe· tans. Arnold's favorite faces in the exhibit belong to two Buddhist monks from Suz· hou, featured in two photographs. "They have the most wonderful expres­sions," she said, "full of compassion and an inner-light. I met them on my first trip to China during the winter of 1979. They were prepared for my visit and met me in The most photographed face in the exhibit, this retired Scechuan worker introduces Arnold's special interest in ChiM8e faces. A girl and her horse: Thee members of the Inner·Mongolian Militia are in trainined to combat Soviet tanks. their beautiful flowing robes. We became fast friends despite the obvious language barrier.'' "When I returned in summer, though, they didn't know I was coming. I found them sweating in the garden in T-shirts and dirty trousers." In addition to her study of faces, Arnold has spent considerable time focusing on the different land and cityscapes through· out China.In their own way, they are as expressive of China as are the faces of the people. They, too, are diverse, and range from a holiday beach, a peasant's home, or Shanghai river traffic, to factories, indus· trial complexes, or the Potala Palace in Tibet-the once home of the Dalai Lama. There is an austere beauty to this exhibit, one brought about by the uncom· plicated nature of the photographs. Arnold, quite happily for the viewers, has not succumbed to the temptation of "dramatizing" her photographs. Rather, she gives their simplicity full reign, exploiting it to the best possible outcome. She even offers a glimpse of the humor· ous and whimsical nature of the Chinese, with photographs such as a circus goat walking a tightrope, not to mention the exhibit's closing shot-a small black and white television mounted on a wooden table covered in lace, which in tum is mounted on a large wooden table, covered in linen. The sheer incongruity of it all is delightful. In China: Photographs By Eve Arnold is a most beautiful and worthwhile exhibit. It offers Westerners an exciting inside look at an ancient culture steeped in mystery. The exhibit housed in the Weiss Gallery at the Museu~ of Fine Arts, will remain on view through October 24. Art and China lovers, take time out of your busy schedules for a short jaunt to the Orient. The photographs are truly uni· versa!, and speak for themselves. 26 MONTROSE VOICE/ SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 Heritage ) Late Nite New Hours 11 to 2 New Happy Hours 11-7, 90¢ drinks \ Happy Hour midrnte to 2 _) 90¢ drinks ' lr \ \ THE DEEP \ I l Grant at Jackson 528-8234 The 'Queen' of America? Why Did Men of Suspiciously Similar Back­grounds Band Together in Early America? By Patrick Franklin Stonewall Features Syndicate After the first flush of success in 1776, when the United States proclaimed its independence, the patriotic fervor of the War for Independence carried the fled· gling nation along in spite of the obvious insufficiencies of its governmental sys­tem. After the victory at Yorktown in 1781, when the country settled down to what was hoped would be a normal way oflife, it soon became apparent that the Articles of Confederation, the statement of how our central government would function, were far too weak to be functionaL Anarchy threatened. There is a happy ending to this, of course. But it took six years before what we know as the Consititution of the United States was ratified in 1787. In the mean· while, a number of proposals and schemes arose, including one that came within an inch of succeeding; one that would have had far-reaching repercussions for the gay world, perhaps even today. That was the drive to institute a consti· tutional monarchy here, much like the one that rules England today. It's not the idea itself that is of interest to us; it is the com· position of what can only be called a gay cabal that stood behind the idea. Dealing with a world that still regarded kings as a class removed from the normal run of human beings, it was perhaps only logical that the founding fathers would look to this hope as a solution to their prob· !ems. Indeed, the first person offered the monarchy was George Washington, who as we all know, turned it down. But the idea didn't die there. Kingship still seemed to many to be the only positive possibility for a strong cen­tral government. The search was on for likely candidates, and on November 2, 1786, Baron von Steuben, one of Washing· ton's eminent lieutenants, wrote to Henry, Prince of Prussia, conveying his support for Henry's coronation along with that of Alexander Hamilton, James Monroe, and Rufus King. Nathaniel Gorham, the presi· dent of the Continental Congress, was also in favor of Henry, and Benjamin Franklin, an aficionado of things German (he had proposed German as our official national language), was believed to be sympathetic. How gay was this? To begin with, Henry was the brother of Frederick the Great, known to be gay, and documented in his own words and those of Voltaire. Henry's homosexuality was recounted by Mira· beau, the French Ambassador to the Court of Berlin. The prince's relations with some of his lovers were so blatant that even Frederick felt compelled to intervene in the interest of decorum. Alexander Hamilton's love letters to John Laurens are now well known; it is obvious that the two men had far more than a platonic relationship going for them. James Monroe's relationship with James Madison was extremely close and has been a source for speculation for decades. Rufus King, the Senator from Alabama in later life, maintained a liason with President James Buchanan so strong that Andrew Jackson referred to King as "Miss Nancy," and another politician of the period called King's appointment as Minister to France his "divorce" from Buchanan. Baron von Steuben, the writer of the let­ter to Henry, may have been forced tojour· ney to America and take part in our revolutionary history because of "having taken undue familiarity with young boys." Steuben's not inconsiderable estate was left to two young men, William North and Ben Walker, both of whom took roles in the later government of the country. Little is known about Gorham, except for his intimate partnership with another man in business dealings that were so unsuccessful that he died of apoplexy at age 50 when they collapsed. Franklin, whose sexuality was doubtlessly non-gay, abandoned the project early on. Most of the men involved joined the Constitutional Convention and signed the document in 1787, achieving positions of prominence in American government in the years that followed. The spark of monarchical fire flarPd only for a brief moment. But for today's gay people, there has to remain a question, an intriguing mystery. Why did those men of such suspiciously similar background band together? Why did they choose a candidate for kingship who was known to be gay? Was there, at that early point in our history, an attempt at formulating gay rights, or even a gay hegemony? Did the United States almost have a real queen? Perhaps some day, we'll know. 01982 STONEWALL FEATURES SYNDICATE SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 27 Viola Wills at Numbers By Nick Fede There is no one who performs soulful old standards that have been revitalized into dance music better than song siren Viola Wills. The singer was in concert on September 6 at Numbers, 300 Westheimer. She sang some of her biggest hits that including "Stormy Weather," "Maybe This Time," and her well known version of Gordon Lightfoot's "You Could Read My Mind." Her force-filled vocals come unexpect­edly, because she sings with such set con­centration that her high notes, when held, can shatter the strongest glass-or so it seems. She moved gracefully at varying times through the crowd, creating a visual bond Viola Wills that had them shouting encouragements while moving to her music. Her voice never cracked throughout her hour and a half appearance. That accom­plishment is one that many performers constantly strive for. She invited crowd members several times to join her on the stage which left those who were chosen smiling brightly long after her performance had ended. Finishing with a Sound of Music med­ley, Viola seemed to have half the club crowd up on the stage with her. This made watching a chaotically exciting treat. "I don't like the rain, so we've got to Automatic bring a little sunshine here before I leave Sergui Comissiona the stage," she said. There was sunshine written all over the crowd's faces when the songstress threw handfuls of small glossies into the eagerly waiting hands of the crowd, and they quickly seized upon the photos that had fallen around their feet. Viola Wills was the perfect end to the long Labor Day weekend and it was all reflected in the ecstatic looks on the faces of the crowd when they left. Hot Trix By Drorit Nu-wave is alive and well and living in Minneapolis? The Specimens, the toast of the Minnea­polis nu-wave scene, will return to Joe Starr's Omni tomorrow and Sunday at 9:30 p.m. The Specimens, who were so impressed with the Houston nu-wave scene, are con­sidering a permanent move. Minneapolis' loss may well become Houston's gain. The gay bars to rock and rolL .. Rock and roll comes to Mary's Sunday, when Automatic returns for their second big week, between 5:00 and .~:00 p.m. "This is quite a departure, Larry Sotoo­deh drummer and band spokesman, said. "U~til recently, Jive rock an~ roll bands haven't concentrated on playmg the gay bars." . . Automatic, a trio featunng. bass, gmtar and drums, has a new smgle, to be released in the next couple of weeks. "Confused," which will appear on 97- FM's Home Grown album, has even begun to get airplay. Member of the Specimens Sotoodeh feels that Mary's is giving the band a good opportunity to expand their horizons. "We always enjoy doing the most outra­geous things we can," he said. "Mary's is giving us the chance to reach new lows." Kindreds to host record release bash •.. Kindred Spirits will be hosting a record release party Sunday, September 12, between 5 and 8 p.m. featuring Reynolds and Rand playing their new single "With• out My Friende." • The party, with special guest star Debra Danbury, will benefit the Montrose Coun­seling Center. Symphony to open with Beethoven .•• The Houston Symphony Orchestra will open its 1982-83 season on Saturday, Sep­tember 11; Sunday, September 12; and Monday, September 13. Artistic Advisor Sergiu Comissiona will lead the Houston Symphony, Chorale and soloists in Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 "Choral." Opening the conceri will be the Bach-Stokowski "1'.occata and Fuge'in D-Montrose Live· Minor," and the Bach-Stravinsky "Choral Variations on Von Himmel Hoch." Saturday and Mondays concerts will begin at 8:00 p.m. Sunday concert will begin at 2:30 p.m. All concerts will be held in Jones Hall Clogging their way to stardom .•• The Montrose Country Cloggers, an all­male group, began teaching their craft to Houston women over Labor Day Weekend at Kindrd Spirits. Because of the interest generated by the women, a women's clogging group is being formed. Interested potential cloggers should call 665-9756 for more information. Nightclub Entertainment This Week In Montrose (Friday, September 10, through Thuf"lday, September 16) •PIANO Montgomery. Mayes & Stritch 9pm Friday & Satur­day: Mary Hooper & Bill Hudson 9pm Monday: & Linda Petty 9pm Tuesday-Thursday at Rascals. 2702 Kirby, 524-6272 Martha Turner 8pm Sunday at Bacchus, 523 Lovett, 523-3396 Jim Cater & Tom Williams Spm Friday & Saturday; Greg Davis 8pm Sunday & Wednesday; Tom Williams 8pm Tuesday; & Mickey Rankin 8pm Thursday at Keyboard. 3012 Milam, 528-6988 Richard Askin & Dana Rogers 10pm Wednesday­Saturday al the Copa (piano bar). 2631 Richmond. 528-2259 Sheila Ceasar & Joe Thal ken 9pm Friday & Saturday; Uonshare 9pm Sunday & Monday; & Karen & Lam­bert 9pm Tuesday-Thursday at Ba1a·s, 402 Lovett, 527-9866 Alexandra Haas & Michael Bailey9:30pm Friday. Sat­urday, Wednesday & Thursday; & Marquerite 4pm Monday-Friday at Arno's. 4002 Montrose. 528-2993 • ROCK 'N ROLL Automatic 5pm Sunday (weather permitting) at Mary's. 1022 Westheomer. 528-8851 Buxdelux 6pm Sunday at Gorky's. 623 Westhelmer. 527-9971 • COUNTRY 6 COUNTRY/ROCK The New Happy Trail Riders Country-Western Bog­gie Band9:30pm Friday at Happy Trails. 715 Fa1rv1ew. 521-2792 Ab & the Rebel Outlaws 9:30pm Friday & Saturday & 8:30pm Thursday at the Exile. 1011Bell,65~3; & 8:30pm Sunday at Brazos River Bottom, 2400 Brazos. 528-9192 Flying Blind Band 9pm Tuesday-Saturday & Texus 4pm Saturday & Sunday at Moss Charlotte's, 911 Drew. 528-8840 Mustang Band 9:30pm Friday & Saturday & 8:30pm Wednesday & Thursday at Brazos River Bottom. 2400 Brazos. 528-9192 •GUITAR "L" 9pm Friday & Irish Folk 9pm Wednesday at the Parlour, 2402 Mandell. 529-8069 Susan Christian 5:30pm Friday; Reynolds & Rand 5:30pm Monday: Rawslyn Ruff on 5:30pm Tuesday: & Lyra 5:30pm Wednesday & Thursday al Kindred Spir­its. 5245 Buffalo Speedway, 665-9756 • SHOW GROUPS Dixie Kings 9pm Saturday & 8pm Sunday al Happy Trails. 715 Fairview, 521-2792 Mata Hari 9:30pm Friday & Saturday at Bacchus. 523 Lovett, 523-3396 John Day & Co. 6pm Sunday at E/J's, 1213 Rich­mond. 527-9071 •JAZZ The ADO Jazz Quartet 8pm Sunday & Thursday at Harrar's, 428 Westheomer, 526-2895 Robert Ceballos Group 9pm Sunday 9pm Friday, Sat­urday. Wednesday & Thursday at Las Brisas, 614 W. Gray. 528-9959 •COMEDY The Best of Comedy Worksh1p Volume 118:30 & 11 pm Friday & Saturday & 8:30pm Wednesday & Thursday: Manuel Labor 1s the Not the President of Mexico 8:30pm Sunday & Monday at Comedy Workshop. 2105 San Felipe. 524-7333. Stand-up comics n•ghtly atComm1xAnnex, 2105San Felipe, 524-7333. • IMPRESSIONISTS Donna Day. Naomi Sims & Hot Chocolate Sunday evening at the Copa. 2631 Richmond. 528-2259 Little Bobby, Tracey, & guests Sunday evening at Exile, 1011 Bell. 65~0453 "Playgirl Follies" 10:30pm Saturday at Pink Elephan1, 1218 Leeland, 65~0040 •NU WAVE The Trouble Boys 9:30pm Friday; & the Specimens 9:30pm Saturday & Sunday at Omni. 1540 West­he1 mer. 528-4230 • MISCELLANEOUS NTalent shows Tuesday evening at the Copa, 2631 Richmond. 528-2259; Wednesday evening at M1dnite Sun, 534 Westhe1mer. 526-7519; Thursday evening at Twins, m 'flesllyjomer 520-0244, & 10.30pm Tlirus­day at Brazos River Bottom. 2400 Brazos. 528-9192 28 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat SEPT SEPT 10 11 SEPT SEPT SEPT SEPT SEPT 12 13 14 15 16 For 1dd1tt0nal 1nformatlon about events listed below, k>ok for the sponsoring organization under "Organ1utkm1· In the Montroee Directory Selected Events through 7 Days •FRIDAY: Interact' a Commu­nity Coffeehouse 7:30pm­midnight, 3405 Mulberry mFRIDA Y: Lambda Alanon meeting at First Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin mFRIDA Y-SATURDAY: Midwest Gay & Lesbian Con­vention in Chicago flSUNDA Y: Montrose Sports Tennis, 10:30am, MacGregor Park • TUESDAY: Montrose Sports Volleyball League games 7:30 p.m., Gregory-Lincoln School, 1101 Taft • TUESDAY: MSA Women's Softball League "Variety Show" 8pm, Sept. 14, Numbers 2, 300 Westheimer •THURSDAY: Montrose Sports bowling, 9pm at Sta­dium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain • THURSDAY: Wilde 'n Stein gay radio show lOpm-midnight on KPFT Radio, FM-90 Selected Events in Future Weeks mJN 1 WEEK: 3rd Annual Gay American Arts Festival in Chi­cago opens Sept. 17, lasting to Oct. 10 •IN 1 WEEK: Colt 45s hold Country/Western Carnival, 8pm, September 18, 2400 Bra­zos, a benefit for Gay Switch­board, Neartown Association, Autistic Children and Kaposi's Sarcoma Committee • IN 1 WEEK: Montrose Sports Association Monday night bowling league begins winter season Sept. 20, Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain • IN 4 WEEKS: Gay Academic Union 8th national conference and "Discover '82" exhibition and workshops Oct. 8-10, Con­rad Hilton Hotel, Chicago m!N 4 WEEKS: lat Annual • Conference of National Lesbian/ Gay Pride Celebration Coordinators in Boston, Oct. 9-11 • IN 4 WEEKS: Columbus Day, Oct. 11 • IN 6 WEEKS: Gay Atheist League of America national convention in Houston, Oct. 15-17, Americana Hotel, 3301 Southwest Fwy. • IN 6 WEEKS: Westheimer Colony Art Festival Oct. 16-17 • IN 7 WEEKS: Halloween weekend, Oct. 29-31 •IN 7 WEEKS: Elections, Nov. 2 m!N 10 WEEKS: Thanksgiv­ing, Nov. 25 • IN 13 WEEKS: Chanukah, Dec. 10 •IN 13 WEEKS: Human Rights Day, Dec. 10 • IN 16 WEEKS: Christmas Day, Dec. 25 • IN 16 WEEKS: New Yea r's Eve, Dec. 31 •NEXT YEAR: Gay Pride Week in late June mNEXT YEAR: Reno National Gay Rodeo Sept. 1-4 BUSINESS OWNERS. (1) WelisrfreeeachwHk In this directory (a) business establishment& &ervinQ as distribution.points for the newsp1,,.r, (b) current display advertisers, (c) all Houston gay bars & private club• ( lor the benefit of out-of­:;:,;~ ni~::=) and JdJ non-profit community e lndlcatn MontroH Vok:e dletrfbutktn pofntl COMMERCIAL SPACE Montrose/St. Thomas area for lease for office &/or efficiency apt. 1625 Richmond. Just remodeled. $375/ mo. 522-6054, 665-5207. DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES Ga)'. male executive professional. early 30s, desires successful lesbian profeu1onal career woman to share lu,.;urious 2BR/2--car garage townhome near SW Fwy. & Hillcroft & LOoP. Robb, POB 36174, Houston. TX 77236 WANTED, MALE TO SHARE HOUSE WITH SAME IN SCARS­DALE. $200/MO. 112 UTILITIES. CRAIG 424-0076 AFTER 5. Montrose/St. Thomas area for lease for office &/or efficiency apt. 1625 Richmond. Just remodeled. $3751 mo. 522-6054, 665-5207. HUNTSVILLE. Share home near campus with 27, professional. Dis­crete, non-smoker only. (713) 295- 4991. Large 1 bedroom In 1mall, friendly complex. Branard and Mandell area. Only profHalonal and/or 1erlou1 need apply. $350 + electrlclty. Dep­oalt required. 523-2114 after 5pm. RESPONSIBLE G!W/M WOULD LIKE SAME TO SHARE 2 BEDROOM IN OLD APARTMENT HOUSE. HELP PAINT & DECORATE. $160 MONTH. BILLS PAID $80 DEPOSIT. AVAILA­BLE IMMEDIATELY. CALL DAVID. 521-9736. The Voice has more news, more Houston advertising, more Houston readers EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED Pianist needed: mature, over 40? Who knows how to tickle the ivory from the ol' days withg love. Call 757-9978. Leave message. Movert, drlvar (with or without truck). Full/part-time. Burton. 521- 3155. Houston's leading gay pub­lication is the Voice GAY BARS (A) Houston Tevem Guild member 1ndlcatton, placed m this directory at their request eBACCHUl-523 Lovett-523-3396: live enter­tainment See our ad elsewhere this issue eBAJA's-402 Lovett- 527-9866 with restau­rant. live entertainment See our ad elsewhere this issue Randy Alfred's 'Dateline S.F.,' twice a month in the Voice e AllARN- 710 Pacifac-528-9427· country See our ad elsewhere this issue e BRAZOS RIVER BOTTOM- iol-00 Brazos- 528-9192: countrv Montrose Classified eBAIAR PATCH-2294 W HOiCOrTibe-665- 9678 eCHASES-1 416 Richmond- 520-1646: disco eCHICKEN COOP- 535 Westheimer- 526· 2240 eCOPA-2631 Aichmond- 528-2259- disco with shows See our ad elsewhere this issue COVE- 2912 S. Shephord- 524-0170 There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice e THE DEEP-2212 Converse- 528-8234 See our ad elsewhere this issue e OIFFEAENT DAUM- 1732 Westhe1mer 528- 8528- leather See our ad elsewhere this issue e>.OIRTY SALLY'S-220 Avondale- 529-7525 See our ad elsewhere this issus eooueLE A SALOON-5731 Kirt>y-521-1444 See our ad elsewhere this issue eE/J's- 1213 AIChmond- 527-9071 See our ad elsewhere this issue e>.EXILE- 1011 Bell- 659-0453: country Pulitzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice e GALLEON- 2303 Alchmond- 522-7616 See our ad elsewhere this issue e GAY BOY INTERNATIONAL (G .B.1.)- 1419 Aichmond-528-8903 9 GAANT STREET STATION-911 Falrvlew- 528-8342 See our ad elsewhere this issue Montrose Classified Advertising Rates You have a choice of these styles: 10¢: per regular word or 15C: PEA ALL CAPITAL WORD in 6-Point type, as shown here. {If using few words in this size or If centering on a line, compute at 80¢ a line, using maximum 7 regular words or 5 ALL CAPITAL WOADS to a line.) 25¢ per regular word or 40¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD in 8-point type, as shown here. (If using few words in this size or if centering on a line, compute at $1.50 a line, using maximum 5 regular words or 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) 40¢ per regular word or 60¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD in 10-point type, as shown here. (If using few words in this size or if centering on a line, compute at $2.00 a line, using maximum 4 regular words or 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) 50¢ per regular word or 75¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD In 10-polnt bold type, as :ioe per regular word or 45~ PER shown here. (If using few ALL CAPITAL WORD In &-point words In this size or If cen­bold type, aa •hown here. (If ualng terlng on a llne, compute at few words In thl1 alze or If centering on a llne, compute at $1 .50 a une, $2.00 a llne, using maximum ualng mHlmum 4 reguler wordl or 3 regular words or 2 ALL 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a llne.) CAPITAL WORDS to a llne.) Individual or few words in any one size should be computed at the per line rate. You may freely mix ALL CAPS and lower case words, and regular and bold words, provided they are all the same type SIZE (6, 8 or 10 point). Simply compute each word individually. You may NOT mix type SIZES on the same line. THERE IS A MINIMUM charge of $3 per classified ad. BLIND BOX NUMBERS can be assigned for $2 per week extra. Run the same classified 4 weeks in a row and deduct 15%. If your classified is lengthy, you may want to consider running a "display" ad instead. Call our advertising sales department for information. WRITE OUT your ad on a plain sheet of paper. Include your name, address, check and signature, and mail or bring it to the Montrose Voice, 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006. Ads received by 5:30pm Tuesday will be in that week's newspaper. ALL CLASSIFIED ads must be paid in advance. Sorry, but we cannot bill and cannot accept classifieds over the phone. Murphy's ManorayKurtErichsen H<Z<j, Marl: last W«.k I saw ibis gay film- Wa~ 1.4>! Its about tt-.e first maltz S<lamsmzss in a rnift<ZJ'l factory. tt's called Making (jhw- ~ bos5 stags wi~ his wik, and h htn> marries tt"z gii-1 nut door, and has ten kids. That way, apparr:nt~ being gay is ol<acj. You could W he was ~till gay, 1ho1.1gh- he had "r111 f:/dy • fa~d on tis fbrchcacf. •HAPPY TAAILS- 715 Fairview- 521-2792 See our ad elsewhere this issue eHOLE HOUSE-109 Tuam-522-6178c closed due to fire eJ.R 's-808 Paclflc- 521-2519 eJUST MARION & LYNN'S-817 Fairview- 528-9110: lesbian •KEYBOAAD- 3012 Mllam-528-6988: piano entertainment See our ad elsewhere this issue Support, join your community organizations eKINDRED SPIRITS- 5245 Bullalo Speedway-665-9756: predominantly lesbian See our ad elsewhere this issue eLAMPOST- 2417 Times Blvd.-528-8921c les­bian See our ad elsewhere this issue •LAZY J - 312 Tuam- 528-9343 eLOADING DOCK-1735 Westheimer-520- 1818: leather disco •AMAAY'S-1022 Westheimer- 528-8851 See our ad elsewhere this issue ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations e AMIDNITE SUN- 534 Westheimer - 526--7519: disco, shows eMISS CHARLOTIE'S-911 W. Oraw- 528- 88-40: country •MONTROSE MINING C0.-805 Paciflc-529- 7488 eNUMllERS 2- 300 Westholmor-528-6551c disco See our ad elsewhere this issue eOFFICER'S CLUll- 2701 Albany- 523-4084 See our ad elsewhere this issue eONE ON ONE- 1016 W. Gray-52&-6503 •PINK ELEPHANT- 1218 Leelond- 859-0040: with shows See our ad elsewhere this issue eRANCH-eB201> Meln- 528-6730 eRASCALS- 2702 Klrby-524-6272: with res­taurant. live entertainment See our ad elsewhere this issue eROCKY'S-3416 W. Oallat- 528-8922: lesbian eTWtHS- 535 Weanielmer- 520-02«: lesbian d/SCO The number one source of community news in Montrose-the Voice eVENTURE-N- 2923 Maln- 522-0000 ORGANIZATIONS A CAPELLA Chorus: part of (Montrose) Church of Christ - ACLU- 1236 W. Gray-524-5925 AMERICAN LEA THERMEN (social club)­meets at Different Drum, 1732 Westhelmer- 528·8528: club night Wed. Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 ASTRO RalnbOw Alliance- 524-4793 (voice & TTY) BERING Memorial Methodist Church-1440 Hawthorne- 526-101 7· United Methocll.st wor­ship serwce 10:50sm Sun. BETWEEN TWO Worlds-529-1913: mHts•v•ry other Thurs. BLACK & WHITE MEN Together (BWMT)-529- 5006, 747·9812 (Montro.se) CHURCH OF CHRIST-520-K West­heimer- 7n-9286: worship serviees 12:30pm Sun. 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment CITIZENS FOR HUMAN EQUALITY (CHE)- 609 Fannin #1301 -236-8~: board meeting 2nd Tuesdays COLT "'5'S (social club)-meets •t Brazos River Bottom, 2400 Brazos-528-9192 •COMMUNITY COFFEEHOUSE-project of llH Inc.: 7:30pm Fridays et 3405 Mulberry CONG. AYTZ CHA YIM- meets al MCCR, 1919 Decatur-552-1340. 688-8f197: service & soc1•I 8pm 2nd & 4th Fridays CONROE AREA Gay Women- 756-035"' CRISIS HOTLINE-228-1505 The Voice has more news, more Houston advertising, more Houston readers Voice Comics • 1982 MONTROSE VOICE, HOUSTON Do you come with the lunch or iust a la carte? DIAL-s-Gsy-Atheist-524-2222: project of Gay Athei.st League o f America DIANA FOUNDA TION-2700 Masoo-524·5791 DIGNITY-mHts st Catholic Student Center, 1703 Bolsover-520-9269, 528-76«: meetings 7pm Saturdays Houston's leading gay pub­lication is the Voice FAMILY & FRIENDS of Gays-464-6663: meets 2pm 3rd Sundays st Community Coffeehouse, 3405 Mulberry FIRST UNITARIAN Church-5210 Fannin- 526- 1571: worship service 11; 15am Sun. GREENSPOINT/ FM1960 Ares Far-Away Friends-821-9681 GAY & ALIVE Sharing Experience (GASE)- 528-1311, 528-0891 Randy Alfred's 'Dateline S.F.,' twice a month in the Voice GAY ARCHIVES of Texas: project of Interact GAY A THEIST League of America-524-2222 mltlonal convention Oct. 15-17, Amencan• Hotel. 3301 Southwest Fwy., Houston GAY HISPANIC CAUCUS- 2722 Newman 1112- 521-0037: meets 3rd Thursdays GAY ITAL/AN Group - 526-9844 GAY NURSES & PHYSICIANS of Houston-clo GPC-521-1000 GAY POLITICAL CAUCUS (GPCJ-POB 66664, 77266-521- 1000: meetings 4600 Main 11217 7:30pm 1st & 3rd W6dnesdays There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice GAY SWITCHBOARD-529-3211 Greater Montrose BUSINESS GUILD: sponsor­ing members are El J's club, Frame of Rtference, Montrose Voice, SpHdy Printing, Spud-U-Llk•. Travel Tech travel agency HEPA TITUS HOTLINE, project of GPC's Mtdl­cs/ Committee-521-1000 HOMOPHILE INTERFAITH Alllance-129 Manor-523-6969 Pulitzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice Houston Ares GAY & LESBIAN ENGINEERS & Sci•ntists-526-7386· meets 7pm 4th Wednesday& SEPTEMBER 10, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 29 Commentary Good Food for Gay Brains By Allen Young Stonewall Features Syndicate "Support your independent bookseller." That brief but important message is featured in a small article in the current "book news" from Alyson Publications (Box 2783, Boston, MA 02208), one of the new gay-<>wned publishing companies that is enriching our lives with interesting writing. The Alyson people mention that all their books are availble by mail, "but," they add, "first we hope you'll ask for them at your local independent bookstore." Since Alyson can make more money on a direct-mail sale, they explain their rationale: "Most large and medium sized cities have at least one such (inde­pendent) bookstore, run by people who want to supply the community with a wide variety of reading m
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