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Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987
File 021
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Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987 - File 021. 1987-03-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 6, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/871/show/862.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-03-20). Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987 - File 021. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/871/show/862

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987 - File 021, 1987-03-20, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 6, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/871/show/862.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date March 20, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 021
Transcript 20 MONTROSE VOICE / MARCH 20, 1987 'Beyond Therapy' May Be Just That (left to right) Tom Conti, Jeff Goldblum, Julie Hagerty, Chris Campion. Christopher Guest and Glenda Jackson in "Beyond Therapy" Houston Screens by Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice □ Beyond Therapy Beyond Therapy? Well, if you've been reading my theater columns, you'll know that Christopher Durang is not my favorite playwright. Oh, he cooks up a funny premise and a good beginning. He adds an enjoyable middle that's controversial enough for several good arguments. The man simply cannot write an ending. Sooner or later a revolver is fired, his idea of a climax. Then, rather than resolving anything, everything unravels fairly quickly. However, I can read box office figures as well as the next man. Durang does have a following. The production of Beyond Therapy at Houston's Stages was quite popular. So one may wonder what happened with the first movie of one of his major works. In some ways, the Stages production was a lot better. Charlotte, the childish psychologist, was a lot more fun. Two- time Oscar winner Glenda Jackson is woefully miscast here. She seems to miss the point entirely. Everything she does is so adult and dignified. The show involves a bisexual man, Bruce (Jeff Goldblum), who finds a lady, Prudence (Julie Hagerty), through a personal ad. He obviously did not clear the ad with his lover, Bob (Christopher Guest). Naturally, this upsets Bob. Rather than accord the lovers' relationship the same dignity they would a marriage, thus being forced to understand Bob's outrage, the filmmaker's attitude can be summed in in a quote from a press release, "Bob, a psychologically unstable individual intensely jealous of his live-in lover." On stage, Bob was a fruitcake as in nutso. But, he was no stranger than any of the other characters. In the movie, most of the other characters have been deflated a little, down to basically life size. It now looks as if Bob has been singled out for more ridicule than the rest. And no longer do Bruce and Prudence keep visiting a metaphysically empty restaurant where the waiter is never seen. The waiter is now threaded throughout the entire work and his character changed in ways that might best remain a surprise. He is played by Chris Campion, whose boyish beauty was thought by many to be the only redeeming value in Polanski's Pirates. The restaurant and its habitues actually becomes one ofthe most interesting characters. It's now Bruce's own fault that he is never waited on. On the other hand, the naturalness imposed on the script by its new medium does reign in the worst of Durang's excesses. This new discipline does pay off at times. Director Robert Altman adds some weirdness of his own, though. For example, he thought of this as a French-style farce. So he shot it in France with a French crew and supporting players. This story about Yankees who occasionally wish they could go to Paris now has the feel of a foreign art film. I wouldn't be surprised if this film does eventually do well in art houses. However, I wonder about its success in general release. I don't even really expect it to find a large cult following. But I've been wrong about Durang's audiences before. each killed individually. Both entertainingly and inventively, each expires for some specific reason. Partly because of that, perhaps partly because of a fairly weak musical score, the screen is not crammed to bursting with action. The pace is more natural, less frenetic. The aim is for more suspense, more meaningful action. The sex is very graphic, but only verbally. The pretty boy does eventually get his addenda threatened and then shallowly slashed with some shears. Then that act is questioned by a mafia don. But at neither time do we even get a rear shot. The plot is not handed to the viewei on a silver platter, either. You have to work your own imagination to link everything together at first. I liked the chal lenge. The film's return to conservative values might make it feel a little old- fashioned, but I would welcome more like it. Too many people have lost sight of what "gratuitous violence" means. d Openings Burglar—Whoopi Goldberg and Bernie Rh oden barr The Good Father (Belair) My Sweet Little Village (Belair)—the Czechoslovakian nomination for the best foreign film Oscar One Woman or Two (Greenway) Lolita: The Ixrved One (Rice Media Center, 20)—ONO! True Stories (Greenway and River Oaks, 20) Bernie Rhodenbarr (Whoopi Goldberg) and Carl Heffler (Bob Goldthwait) plan how they will circumvent the police and find the murderer for the crime Bernie is suspected of in "Burglar" Bob (Christopher Guest), Bruce (Jeff Goldblum) and Prudence (Julie Hagerty) find themselves in a strange and uncomfortable situation in "Beyond Therapy" a Heat Burt Reynold's latest movie, Heat, is probably not going to be as big a hit as Lethal Weapon. That's really sad, because it's a better-made movie. The pretty boy who has a twisted psychotic need to hurt other people is the villain, not the hero. When he says that he didn't do anything wrong when he savagely beat a woman because she's a whore and it's impossible to be cruel to a whore, you know not only that his days are numbered but also that they deserve to be. The hero does not glorify in violence. It is only something that he does well The necessity of it gives him headaches. This is the kind of movie where you should count every bullet. But the filmmakers don't stop there. They accord human life the same honor. There are only as many people on each side of the conflict as there logically must be. Those who must die are Tutti a Casa (MFA, 20)—Everybody Go Home! ONO! To Be or Not to Be; Miss Tatlock's Millions (Rice Media Center, 21)—the Jack Benny original. ONO! La Voglia Matta (MFA, 21)—Crazy Desire. ONO! Fundi: The Story of Ella Baker (Rice Media Center, 22)—biography of a woman wh committed her life to the American civil rights movement. Risate di Giola (MFA, 22)—Joyous Laughter. ONO! Bad (River Oaks, 23)—by Andy Warhol 81/j (River Oaks, 25)—by Federico Fel- lini Nosferatu (Goethe Institute, 26)— Klaus Kinski as the vampire. Freebies. ONO! The Rules of the Game (Rice Media Center, 26,)-ONO!
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