Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987
File 018
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987 - File 018. 1987-03-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/871/show/859.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-03-20). Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987 - File 018. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/871/show/859

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987 - File 018, 1987-03-20, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/871/show/859.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date March 20, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 018
Transcript MARCH 20, 1987 / MONTROSE VOICE 17 Anti-Viral Drug Fights AIDS-Related Infection By Larry Doyle UPI Science Writer CHICAGO (UPI)—An anti-viral drug appears effective in controlling an unusual oral infection associated with the AIDS virus and could also lead to therapy for people chronically infected with a form of mononucleosis, researchers reported March 13. The drug, called desiclovir, is not likely to be a treatment for acquired immune deficiency syndrome, but Dr. Deborah Greenspan ofthe University of California-San Francisco said researchers want to see if it could help prevent someone with the AIDS virus from developing the deadly disease. "All of this is quite speculative, but I think you could say we're opening up some very promising avenues for research," Greenspan said at a meeting of the International Association for Springbreakers Fear AIDS DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (UPI)—The scene is the same—college students from the North soaking up sun and suds on Florida's beaches—but the fear of AIDS apparently has ushered in a time of less sexual promiscuity. Although the collegians said in a recent poll that warnings about acquired immune deficiency syndrome had not dampened the party atmosphere of the annual 350,000-student pilgrimage to Daytona Beach, most admitted the AIDS epidemic has made them less promiscuous this year. "You don't go around jumping anyone you want to, like last year," said Ric Arcadi, a sophomore at Mercyhurst College in Erie, Pa. To help combat the spread of AIDS during spring break, a Catholic priest in the spring break mecca of Fort Lauderdale undertook a beachfront "safe sex" campaign to distribute condoms and pamphlets to college students. This action followed Surgeon General C. Everett Koop support of the use of condoms to fight the disease. The makers of Trojan condoms, in a stepped-up promotional campaign following Koop's report, said they also planned to pass out samples and literature this week at Daytona Beach. Students surveyed by The Orlando Sentinel seemed to agree with Koop. "We're worried about it," said Gina Johnson, a sophomore at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Va. "You can get it so many ways." "We've heard it over and over, 'If you go to Florida (for spring break), don't pick up any diseases,'" said Nancy Neil- son, another sophomore at Old Dominion. Brian Fierro, a junior at the State University of New York Maritime College, the Bronx, said it was tougher this year to get women to dance in bars. But he also said he and his friends were being more selective in seeking dates. As an alternative to using condoms to fight AIDS, a Volusia County Chrislian group called The Spring Break Challenge is promoting the idea to students that abstention from sex before marriage is the best precaution against AIDS. Challenge spokesman Bernie Yan- dura said the students need religion instead of sun, sex and beer, and that providing a birth control tool—such as condoms—to students only encourages sexual activity. Dental Research. Greenspan, an associate clinical professor of oral medicine, and her colleagues have been working with patient afflicted with hairy leukoplakia (HL), a whitish patch that appears on the tongues of people who are infected with the AIDS virus but who have not been diagnosed with the disease. HL is technically considered a form of AIDS-related complex, and is considered a marker for later progression to a full-scale case of AIDS. Proposed AIDS-Free Card Draws Mixed Reviews ARLINGTON, Texas (UPI)—Health counselors and gay community leaders fear that cards being sold by a Michigan company, which guarantees that the bearer has tested free of AIDS and serious venereal disease, will impart a false sense of security to those being tested. Peace of Mind Inc. earlier this month said it planned to open an office in the I )allas and Fort Worth area to perform a range of tests and sell the warranty cards at prices between $99 to $649. AIDS educator Dianne Garcia, who works with the Oak Lawn Counseling Center in Dallas, said the program could give those tested the wrong idea. She said it takes four weeks to six months before a person exposed to AIDS, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, tests positive. "If you don't tell people that, they may not be aware there is a window of time where it may actually be just forming the antibodies, but not be detectable," Garcia said. Daniel T. Michaud, co-founder of Peace of Mind Inc., said the card indicates only that the bearer was free of disease when tested. "Now, they must be concerned with (those sexual partners) they meet since the date of the test," he said. The company will test customers at regular intervals. If results are negative, the clients will be issued plastic cards with their photographs, descriptive information and the date of testing, he said. Private physicians and local health centers offer the same battery of tests. Michaud said Peace of Mind will perform two AIDS tests every six months for $99. The next plan, for $225, tests for AIDS, genital herpes, gonorrhea and yeast infections on the first visit, and then again for AIDS six months later. The deluxe package, for $649, includes tests for venereal disease every three months. Bruce Bernard, director of the hospital laboratory and vice president of Harris Methodist-Fort Worth, said tests alone are worth little without interpretation by a physician. "Without the presence of a clinical confirmation, lab tests are pretty much a useless venture and a waste of money," he said. Craig Hess, volunteer coordinator for the Dallas Gay Alliance AIDS resource center, also is skeptical about the program's worth. "I question the accuracy of it (testing) and what people are going to do with the information once they receive it," Hess said. In a recent experiment, Hpeoplewith HL were either given desiclovir or a dummy drug. All eight people treated with desiclovir experienced completely or dramatically reduced lesions. No change was seen in the control group. Greenspan said the finding was particularly interesting because HL appears to be caused by the Epstein- Barr virus, the agent responsible for infectious mononucleosis and which is linked to several cancers. Tissue samples taken from the patients showed no presence of EBV after the drug was administered. "What is exciting about this study is that this drug is clearly effective against Epstein-Barr virus," she said. "What role, if any, this will have in AIDS I really don't know at this point." Scientists have speculated that EBV, as well as other viruses, may be necessary to cause a person infected with the AIDS virus to develop the disease. Greenspan said that if this is the case, desiclovir may help prevent progression to AIDS in some patients. About 90 to 95 percent of adults carry the EBV virus without becoming ill, but some apparently develop an unusual chronic mononucleosis-like syndrome, in which they experience depression, lethargy and an inability to concentrate. Dr. Gary Holmes, epidemiologist with the CDC, said he had not seen Greenspan's research, "but if she's got something that controls EBV, she's really got something." He added, however, that acyclovir, a drug related to desiclovir, has been shown to be ineffective in controlling EBV. $1000 off CLIP THIS AD and attach it to your next order for S 10.00 off any of the following items: (Minimum Order $50) • Letterheads • Postcards • Brochures • Multipart Forms* • 2-Color Printing • Fryers • Contracts • Menus • Resumes • Envelopes • Announcements • Invitations • Business Cards • Door Hangers • Report or Booklet Copying • Invoices MONTROSE BUSINESS GUILD MEMBERS may substitute 10% Discount SPEEOY PRINTING SERVICE cm TEXAS Fast Reliable Service. _._..._. Excellent Ouality, Low Cost iflBl S4O0 BELLAIRE Convenient Southwest Location '■ Wort Mil of Crwmey Roc- M M_p*ridg. CALL 667-7417 PICK UP AND DEU VERY MEMBER GREATER MONTROSE BUSINESS GUILD; GREATER BEU^IRE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Please, one coupon per customer and/or order; cannot be combiner! with other drscounts of special often >AMR BAY TYPE SETTERS A NEW DIVISION OF THE MONTROSEVOICE We'll typeset your Flyers, Menus, Business Cards, Letterheads, Resumes, Brochures, Forms, Ads— and hundreds of other items— the Same Day (Sometimes You Just Want It Right Now!) Get it to us by Noon (or call for a pickup by 11am) and we'll have it ready by 5pm (size of the job permitting) NO MINIMUM TIME LIMIT! If your typesetting really only takes 10 minutes, you'll only be charged for 10 minutes) 81 TYPESTYLES TO CHOOSE FROM Pick Up and Delivery Available ($5 charge) 408 AVONDALE — 529-8490
File Name uhlib_22329406_n334_017.jpg