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Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987
File 015
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Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987 - File 015. 1987-03-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 9, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/871/show/856.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-03-20). Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987 - File 015. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/871/show/856

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987 - File 015, 1987-03-20, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 9, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/871/show/856.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date March 20, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 015
Transcript 14 MONTROSE VOICE / MARCH 20. 1987 CAN XX) UUEft THIS GUV JESS HW? THE CMAJRWN OF A. UNNEPSTfy B0AR> OF REGENTS, CAMWGHIN& TOR MM HKHfcEWCftN mm UKE A, COMMON WWrtStf DOESTH'GW JUSV HASTE NO IKA OF A UNWERSITY PEGEKY'S RJpPfifV WNOmT Government Announces Nationwide Blitz on AIDS By Jan Ziegler UPI Science Writer WASHINGTON (UPI)—The government, beginning a nationwide information blitz to combat the spread of AIDS, will recommend that tens of thousands of Americans, who received routine blood transfusions be tested for the AIDS virus. The U.S. Public Health Service, in a bulletin that was expected to be released Thursday, will say physicians should consider offering AIDS tests to people who had transfusions from 1978 when the disease first began appearing to April 1985 when blood banks began better screening, NBC News reported. It also will suggest tests are more important for those who received multiple transfusions and for sexually active recipients because if infected they would be more likely to pass the disease along. M. Roy Schwarz, director of medical education for the American Medical Association in Chicago said on the NBC "Today" program that a "very, very small" percentage ofthe approximately 34 million to 36 million Americans who received blood transfusions between 1978 and 1985 may find themselves in a "high-risk" situation—people who received multiple transfusions and live near New York. San Francisco and Los Angeles. Schwartz said the odds are 0.06 percent that a person would be found to have the virus. "But I think if you're a person who had multiple transfusions, those numbers don't mean anything. You ought to know if you are at risk." Estimates of those who received the transfusions and may have the AIDS virus range from 12,000 to 20,000 people. Rep. Henry Waxman, D-Calif., told CBS's "The Morning Program" that the government does not have the funds for AIDS testing or counseling. "And we don't even have the confidentiality in place, which would allow people to feel free to come forward for that testing." Waxman said there are waiting lists for people who want to be tested in New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles. "We need more testing facilities. We need more people to counsel." Waxman said testing is "going to be a very, very expensive proposition. If we ask people to pay for it themselves, just the testing may well be $50 to $200." The government information plan released Monday does not address testing, concentrating, instead, on mass media advertising and school education to get people to be more cautious about their sexual contacts and is also designed to induce drug abusers to avoid sharing needles. "Our best hope today for controlling the AIDS epidemic lies in educating the public about the seriousness of the threat, the ways the AIDS virus is transmitted and the practical steps each person can take to avoid acquiring it or spreading it," Health and Human Services Secretary Otis Bowen said in a preface to the plan. The acquired immune deficiency syndrome virus is spread by intimate sexual contact and contaminated blood or needles. People are being urged to remain in strictly faithful monogamous relationships or use a condom. The plan was released Monday by Dr. Robert Windom, assistant secretary for health, before a subcommittee of the House Committee on Government Operations. The plan uses as a base the 22 guidelines on AIDS issued between 1982 and 1986 by the Public Health Service and calls for cooperation among all branches of government, professional and service organizations and the private sector. "Everyone must be aware of behavior that puts them at risk," the plan said. To reach the public at large, the plan recommends a mass media campaign under contract with a major advertising agency, forming a coalition of public and private sector groups to exchange and coordinate education efforts, setting up an information clearinghouse and continuing to support a toll-free AIDS hotline, in existence since 1983. Among the recommendations for education of school-age and college stu dents are a national coalition on AIDS education, development of programs especially for black and Hispanic youth and providing extra help in areas with a heavy percentage of AIDS cases. "The scope and content ofthe school portion of this AIDS education effort should be locally determined and should be consistent with parental values," Bowen's statement said. Public Health Service spokesman James Brown said an advertising agency will be contracted in June, while the national coalition and clearinghouse are in the works. Plans are just beginning for the school coalition, he said. The cost of starting programs called for in the plan will be covered by the $70 million education appropriation in the 1987 budget and the $104 million requested in the fiscal 1988 budget, he said. The financing does not, however, include another tactic under consideration at PHS: direct mailings about AIDS to every household in the country, Brown said. AUTOMOTIVE SPRING SPECIAL Air Conditioning Check & Charge 26.95 Oil & Lube 24.95 Cooling System Service 27.95 1411 Tafl ;-(EE>) 522-2190 TRANSMISSIONS Legislators Grill Health Commissioner on AIDS Programs By De'Ann Weimer UPI Capitol Reporter AUSTIN (UPI)—Conservative lawmakers grilled State Health Commissioner Robert Bernstein March 13 for not advocating abstinence as a way for gay men to avoid contracting AIDS. "Organized agencies have joined in what I consider a propaganda campaign of delusion, (by saying) that this disease AIDS is not particularly related to the homosexual community," charged Rep. Bill Ceverha, R-Dallas. Bernstein and Dr. Ron J. Anderson, chairman of the Board of Health, appeared before the House Appropriations Committee to testify on the Department of Health's budget for the next biennium. Some lawmakers chose to question Bernstein and Anderson on the Health Department's seeming failure to lobby for stricter laws to control the spread of AIDS. "I certainly cannot tell people when to have sex and who to have it with," Bernstein said in response to Ceverha's suggestion that the state consider making sexual activities between homosexuals of higher illegality than its current level of Class C misdemeanor. "What bothers me about the whole thing is somehow or another our official agencies, yours included, are trying to perpetuate a myth that says 'don't worry homosexuals, this is not a homosexual disease,'" Ceverha said. "And what we're telling those people is to go ahead and go on about their business, practice safe sex," while the accumulated evidence shows that gays still run the risk of contracting the disease, he said. "That is totally unfair to those young individuals who are involved in that activity. I have never seen anything come out that said, 'Don't engage in homosexual activities because you stand a good chance of contacting the disease and you're going to die,"' Ceverha said. Anderson argued that sodomy laws are not effective because they drive AIDS victims underground, making it impossible for health officials to track the epidemic. "I'm a First Baptist and so I'm not trying to tell you I'm for an alternative lifestyle," Anderson told committee members. "But at the same time, I think sometimes we let our prejudice towards homosexuals get in the way ofthe public health problems we have to deal with. "The most fundamental of us are having to work this out and sort out our priorities," he said. Comparing the disease to an epidemic of small pox, Rep. Tom Waldrop, D- Corsicana, queried Bernstein on the feasibility of quarentining AIDS patients and carriers. Unlike small pox, Bernstein said someone must "go out of their way" to contract AIDS and quarentining would serve no purpose because the disease is spread by intimate sexual contact only. Anderson worried that discrimination against AIDS victims has placed the burden of carrying for victims ofthe disease on the state. Individuals identified as carriers frequently lose their jobs, homes, and insurance because their tests results become public.
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