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Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987
File 013
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Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987 - File 013. 1987-03-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 13, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/871/show/854.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-03-20). Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987 - File 013. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/871/show/854

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987 - File 013, 1987-03-20, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 13, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/871/show/854.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date March 20, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 013
Transcript 12 MONTROSE VOICE/MARCH 20, 1987 'Much Ado' Over at Main Street Houston Live by Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice I know some of you are afraid of Shakespeare. You associate his name with blown-up ham actors chewing the scenery. Or with archaic language that's difficult to understand. Or ancient people fighting over things that don't matter to us now. Besides, how can anything that's supposed to be that good for you ("the greatest English dramatist that ever lived!") be any fun at all? There is nothing to fear and much to enjoy in the Main Street Theater production of Much Ado About Nothing. There is no overacting. If anything, some of the characters are a little underacted. Nearly everyone, however, is very believable in a very modern way. These people might live next door, if you live in River Oaks. Spoken with clarity, accompanied by actions and emotions we hold in common, the words are actually very easy to understand. These are not street people. I, for one, am glad of that. Right now there are too many plays colored red, what with profanity and other gutter vulgarities. In this production, by and large, here we have the muted pastels one imagines he might here in any boardroom." Steve Garfinkle plays Dogberry in MST's "Much Ado About Nothing" in love with each other. How can they admit it to each other without losing face? Can the day really be saved by Dogberry (Steve Garfinkle), a pompous lower-class ass with a flair for mala- propisms. Shakespeare did have one habit that rehearsal clothes. The whole effect is interesting, at times very pretty. It is never allowed to intrude into the action ofthe play. In fact, it has no interaction with the play itself whatever. Several of Shakespeare's plays were witten to be plays within plays, but this wasn't one of them. However, this approach is not without solid precedents. In Shakespeare's day, the actors wore hand-me-downs from rich fans. They made no attempt to fit the clothes to the locale and time. Evening in a garden, sure—but a hundred years ago in a foreign country, forget it! There's even a famous example where the playwright himself mentioned a clock in a play set long before they were invented, right there in the dialogue. In our own day, Richard Burton's most successful Hamlet was done completely in rehearsal clothes. If it feels good, do it. If it works, emotionally and aesthetically use it. Bless historical accuracy! Send it to heaven and get it out of our hair! (Unless, of course, it would work better.) So, if you've never seen Shakespeare, this would be a good spot to dip your toe in. If you have, this is a welcome visit with an old friend. Whatever, this is a most enjoyable show. □ Notes Don't forget the Houston International Festival, all thir. week! The Alley Award, Houston's most prestigious theater honor, is given each year in recognition of a lifetime's efforts. This year the husband and wife acting team—Jessica Tandy and Hume Cronyn—are the worthy recipients. Their careers, separate and together, have spanned many decades and many styles, originating roles in several modern classics. May they live long and never retire! Well, all ofthe entries are in for Chocolate Bayou's Preston Jones New Play Symposium. There are some 200 plays from all over the country and only three can be chosen. John Pierson, the symposium's coordindator, tells me that each year's crop often reveals trends The distinguished acting couple of Jessica Tandy and Hume Cronyn are recipients of the 1987 Alley Award. The Tony Award-winning couple will discuss their careers in "A Conversation with Jessica Tandy and Hume Cronyn" Saturday, March 21, 6:00 p.m. on the Alley Theatre Large Stage There are two plots. In one, handsome Claudio (Dane Cruz) falls in love with shy Hero (Vicki Luman). His friend Pedro (Tim Plaumbo) helps them become engaged. But on the evening before their wedding, instead of a bachelor party, they're tricked by nasty John (Ray Simmons) into believeing that Hero has been sleeping around. Claudio reacts much as any conservative fiance would today. Her father (Vaughn C. Johnson) takes his side, too. How can poor Hero ever prove her virginity? In the other plot, Beatrice (Claire Hart-Palumbo) and Benedick (Jerry McCulley) are always reading each other's beds. They might remind you of Benson and Krause. But then their friend tricks them into realizing they're not all of our contemporary playwrights do. He always looked at the down side of his funny situations and the funny side of his catastrophes. It makes for a well- rounded play. But with all the insults, the teasing and other word play, the overall mix in this play is hilarious. To point up the play's relevance and to excuse any small errors in authenticity that might be made to help the audience understand the finer details, director Rebecca Greene Udden has turned this show into a play within a play. When we arrive, the actors are doing their warm-ups on stage. Kathleen Lipscomb's sets all face away from the audience. Only half of the period costumes ever reach the theater. So the actors are partly in costume, partly in characters, whether their orientation is central to the plot or not. John also points out a trend away from something. Every year ther have been several new, lousy rewrites of Medea. This year, thankfully but surprisingly, there are none! By the way, they've been able to bring John Henry Faulk's one man show back. It will open March 26 for a three week run. So, if you couldn't get tickets the first time, here's your chance. The Houston Community College production of Kopit's Chamber music, which opens there this Thursday, has already won several top honors at the Texas Junior College One Act Play Competition. When Babes in Arms was translated from the stage to the screen, it became the first of the several in which Judy and Mickey rounded up the kids to do a musical in an old barn. Now, real kids are doing the original at the HITS Unicorn Theater. The Human has traced along Houston city streets to form the giant outline of a man. In the works since 1982, the first phase is now done. You can get maps and see an exhibit at Diverse Works. Then, if you drive the route, you will find permanent markers at the top of his head and the tips of his hands and feet. The tour will take you through a wide diversity of Houston neighborhoods, but not ours. His right bicep touches Westheimer down at Baldwin. Eventually, the sponsoring group hopes to paint the entire route to make the silhouette visible from the air. Richard Fluhr and 100 of his students from the Art Institute of Houston will be completing a mural for the City Wide Club of Clubs Family Recovery Center (4715 Caroline St.) this week. They should have it finished by the evening of March 20. This 145' x 8' mural will fit inside the walls of the existing, two- year-old mural there. Prepaid RSVPs must be in by March 25 for CACH & Business Volunteers for the Arts' 11th State of the Arts Luncheon, March 30 at Two Houston Center. Writer Philip Lopate, artist Derek Bosher and curator/ critic John Caldwell will discuss The Creative Arts in Houston: The Challenges, The Opportunities. $12.50. 658-2483. d Celebrate! March 25, 1903—A court of inquiry was Randy Brecker and Eliane Ettas perform at the Spring Jazz Festival of the Houston School for the Performing and Visual Arts towards certain subjects. From the ones I've read (I'm helping to judge it.), this year's trend seems to be towards gay ordered to investigate charges that Sir Hector "Fighting Mac" Macdonald, one of the most admired generals ofthe Brit-
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