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Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987
File 009
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Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987 - File 009. 1987-03-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 13, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/871/show/850.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-03-20). Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987 - File 009. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/871/show/850

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987 - File 009, 1987-03-20, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 13, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/871/show/850.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date March 20, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript 8 MONTROSE VOICE /MARCH 20. 1987 No Condoms for Texas Prison Inmates HUNTSVILLE (UPI)—State prison officials, citing security and ethical reasons, said they have decided against distributing condoms as a method of curbing the spread of AIDS among Texas inmates. Prison doctors instead will launch a massive educational campaign to teach inmates more about the disease, said Dr. Vonda Reeves, director of the AIDS program at TDC. "This is an institutional issue that basically, at this point, we've made a decision not to issue the condoms," she said. "This is not a firm decision, but at this point we're following the lead ofthe two larger prison systems (California and New York) in the United States." "As the disease changes, so will we modify our protocol and procedures to adapt, to try and address what is happening with it." The Texas Criminal Justice Task Force has recommended that condoms be distributed to Texas prison inmates as a possible way to help curb the spread of AIDS in state prisons. Dr. Lawrence Cunningham, TDC medical chief of staff, said security was a major consideration in deciding against such a policy. Corrections officials are concerned about the potential for inmates' smuggling drugs in prison with the help of condoms, he said. Prison officials also are concerned the distribution of condoms would promote homosexuality. Indians Get AIDS At first it was thought AIDS was a non- Indian problem, but 32 cases have been reported among native Americans since 1981, according to the government's Indian Health Service and Centers for Disease Control. The cases were reported in 14 states as of Feb. 20, according to Pat Johannes, communicable disease activities coordinator for the CDC in Phoenix, Ariz. The total number of deaths from AIDS was 17, with 44 percentof them in California and New York. The age of the patients ranged from 17 to 53 years old. "There is enough evidence to suggest that despite the remoteness of many Indian reservations, even those communicable diseases dependent upon lifestyle for transmission will affect Native Americans, and considerable effort must be put into their identification, treatment and prevention," Johannes wrote in an IHS newsletter. Burt on AIDS By William C. Trott United Press International Burt Reynolds is still irked by rumors that he has AIDS and credits girlfriend Loni Anderson with helping him deal with the reports. "It's real difficult to have any dignity and class when people are saying you're dying of a disease and saying the things they were saying about me," he says in an interview that was to be broadcast last week on "Hour Magazine." "Loni was sensational. When they write about this, somebody should write about how much class and dignity she had through it all. "If, in fact, I had this dreaded disease, then she should have it too, orfe would think. Nobody ever talked about that. Nobody asked her opinion. It was if she didn't exist." In the meantime, Reeves said, prison officials will initiate an informational drive on AIDS within the prisons. "We're launching a massive program of education for inmates," Reeves said. "It will be group education sessions and we will utilize pamphlets and audio visual materials." Cunningham and Reeves spoke with reporters following a daylong TDC seminar for about 400 prison medical workers on the medical, ethical and legal issues of AIDS in prisons. The seminar is the first of several workshops the TDC will offer its personnel. Fifteen TDC inmates have died after developing acquired immune deficiency syndrome, the latest this month. At least five others have AIDS and 32 more have tested positive for the AIDS virus. Two suicides have also been reported among inmates diagnosed with AIDS, Reeves said. The TDC does not screen inmates for the AIDS virus and does not routinely isolate all AIDS patients, she said. Currently, the TDC isolates only those AIDS patients in high risks, such as known homosexuals or intravenous drug users, Reeves said. We're Houston's largest Gay Audience. We're the readers of the Montrose Voice. We're the people you reach when you advertise in the Montrose Voice. We're about 27,000 readers weekly. (There's still another 26.870 of us not pictured above.) You know what else? We, the readers of the Voice, spend somewhere around $6,000,000 weekly on the things we buy—clothes, partying at night, apartments, cars and repair, hair care, serious things and silly things. (Yes. that's $6 million weekly.) Got something to sell next week? We've got the money to buy it. Maybe all you have to do is ask—by advertising to us through our newspaper. The Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE DIAL 529-8490 lor ADVERTISING or HOME DELIVERY Here s how we figured Ihe figures Base t Tuesday temporarily suspended ) Assume readership appro* 27 000 \b\ allowed for re J22S a week (on everything in hie), then we lay (5000 Copies
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