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Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987
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Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987 - File 008. 1987-03-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 10, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/871/show/849.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-03-20). Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987 - File 008. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/871/show/849

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987 - File 008, 1987-03-20, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 10, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/871/show/849.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date March 20, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 008
Transcript MARCH 20, 1987/MONTROSE VOICE 7 Nation's Controversial No.2 Health Official By Tamara Henry WASHINGTON (UPI)—Dr. Robert Windom has explained health issues to patients for 27 years as a practicing physician and for 10 years as a Florida television host, but as the nation's No. 2 health official, he may have some real explaining to do. Windom, who has been assistant secretary of health nine months, was criticized earlier this month when he tried to explain to a Senate subcommittee why he wanted only a 28.5 percent increase in federal dollars for AIDS research and education. He also landed in hot water late last year when he mistakenly told reporters at a luncheon that the Taiwan A flu vaccine should be taken by everyone under 35 years old and over age 65, when, in fact, key health officials recommended the vaccine only for persons with severe health conditions. And in less specific matters, Windom struggles to explain the recent rapid technological advances within the health care industry and refuses to predict the future, only to say: "I hope in the next period of years we could have every disease prevented by certain forms of medical intervention, like vaccine." Part ofthe problem stems from the job itself. As assistant secretary for health, Windom directs the activities of the Public Health Service, a component of the Department of Health and Human Services, which with a $360 billion budget is one ofthe largest federal agencies. Windom has served as assistant health secretary since June 1986, after Texas Firm Optimistic in Finding a 4 Super' Vaccine SAN ANTONIO (UPI)—Testing of a single vaccine designed to target three sexual disease—AIDS, herpes and hepatitis B—is under way at the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research. "The approach looks very promising," Ronald C. Kennedy, an associate scientist at the San Antonio research center, said Monday. "What we're doing now are potency studies to determine how powerful it is in small animals," Kennedy said. The basis for the experimental vaccine is a weakened smallpox virus, Kennedy said. New York scientists, who first developed in 1985 a combination vaccine by splicing herpes simplex II and hepatitis B genes into the weakened smallpox, invited the foundation to add genetic material for AIDS. Scientists at the San Antonio center last month cut into the smallpox genetic code machine-made parts of AIDS virus genes. Work is under way to make sure the right AIDS genetic material spliced into the unusual vaccine produces the desired antibodies. Some studies have indicated certain antibodies produced in more traditional vaccine approaches actually help the virus infect white blood cells. "If you make antibodies do the wrong thing, you enhance infection," Kennedy said. "We are still trying to determine which pieces stay in and which pieces come out," he said. being nominated by President Reagan and confirmed by the Senate. Before joining HHS, he was a practicing physician, for 26 years, specializing in internal medicine in Sarasota, Fla. For 10 years, Windom produced and was the host on regular television programs on health topics in Florida. The Public Health Service includes the Health Resources and Services Administration, the Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Administration, the Centers for Disease Control, the Food and Drug Administration, the National Institutes of Health, and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. "It's a constantly evolving and moving organization," said Windom in an interview. "On top of that, we get new diseases, new threats—tampering, for example—and we get problems of new diseases, like AIDS, and other manifestations of old diseases. "The Public Health Service has evolved and is going along with the times, and even been ahead of it at times," said Windom. Acquired immune deficiency syn- 10 Million May Have AIDS Virus GENEVA (UPI)—As many as 10 million people are believed to be infected with the virus that causes AIDS, the director of the World Health Organization's AIDS program said Thursday. Dr. Jonathan Mann said between 4 percent and 15 percent of healthy adults in some parts of the world carry the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and related retroviruses. But the figure is as high as 60 percent to 80 percent in high-risk groups, Mann told an international symposium on immunization. Mann said prospects appear encouraging for a vaccine against HIV, the virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome. People with the virus do not necessarily develop AIDS. "However, the development of a vaccine of proven efficacy and safety, should it be feasible, is a long-term objective that, at best, will take several years to accomplish," Mann said. He said the current 42,000 reported cases of AIDS worldwide "represents only a fraction" ofthe real total because of "reticence in reporting from some areas combined with under-recognition of AIDS and under-reporting to national health authorities." It is more significant, Mann said, that 91 countries have by now officially reported cases of the disease to WHO. That figure is more relevant when assessing the "extraordinary scope and unprecedented urgency ofthe HIV pandemic," he said. "The numbers of AIDS cases provides, at best, an inaccurate and, at worst, a misleadingly optimistic view of the real extent and intensity of HIV infection," Mann told the symposium. "WHO estimates that between 5 million and 10 million persons are currently infected with HIV," said Mann, an American. Testing possible AIDS vaccines will be "complex, difficult, and time- consuming," he warned. "An AIDS vaccine for general use will not be available, if at all, before 1991 and is unlikely to be available before the mid-1990s," Mann said. drome has become a key focus of the Centers for Disease Control based in Atlanta. The National Institutes of Health recently announced the development of a new vaccine for whooping cough that may eliminate the serious side effects of the current vaccine. A pilot study of 100- 150 children 18 months old is about to start in Massachusetts. Windom describes the NIH as "the mecca of health research in the world," starting in 1887 as an attic-room laboratory in the Marine Hospital on Staten Island, N.Y. It is considered the symbol of high-technology medicine; the last- resort clinic where people may turn for the latest experimental therapies when conventional remedies have failed. Even the Public Health Service itself had humble beginnings. It came into being in 1798 as the Marine Hospital Service when President John Adams signed into law an act providing for the "care and relief of sick and disabled seamen." With all the recent changes in the health care field, Windom rejected the idea that society may be moving toward socialized medicine. "This pendulum has been swinging for a long time, you know," Windom said. "There are trends that go back and forth." -L-U HENRY'S nrffm PHOTO * UJ. £ __■ WE'VE MOVED Now located at 408 Avondale The Montrose Voice Building— Around the corner from our old location OPEN DAILY 9-6 CLOSED WEEKENDS The Hills Are Alive. "^arista. Lary/CfhompSOn, D.J., Thurs.—Sun. nights en a. £ O Morning: 7am-Noon Monday ' <-=7 Afternoon: 6pm-8pm Monday-Friday Evening: il 39pm 1230a.. Can Beer Si 25 Draft Beer 75C Well Dr.nl.sSl 7£ 1022 Westheimer naturally Montrose, TX 77006
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