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Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987
File 004
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Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987 - File 004. 1987-03-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 6, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/871/show/845.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-03-20). Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987 - File 004. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/871/show/845

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987 - File 004, 1987-03-20, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 6, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/871/show/845.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date March 20, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript Senate Adopts Bill on Designer Drugs MARCH 20, 1987 / MONTROSE VOICE 3 By Mark Langford UP I Capitol Reporter AUSTIN—The Texas Senate this week passed bills that would crack down on so-called designer drugs and speed labs and require the parents of unwed teenage children to be financially responsible for their grandchildren. The Senate also passed a House resolution Wednesday creating a Tax Equity Commission. Sen. Ray Farabee, D-Wichita Falls, sponsor of the child support bill, said the measure was not only designed to make parents financially responsible but also help prevent teenage pregnancies. 'It would discourage parents from putting their teen children and their children out on the street," he said. "It would involve parents to a greater degree to influence their children not to become pregnant." Under the bill, the parents of unwed teenagers who have children would be financially responsible for those children, until they reach age 18, and their grandchildren. The bill, adopted on a voice vote, would not apply to the parents of married teenage parents or those teenage parents who can provide their own financial support. Farabee said Texas has the second highest number of teenage pregnancies in the nation and is first in the nation in the number of births to girls under age 14. In 1985, 18,600 babies were born to unwed Texas teenagers, Farabee said, adding that 80 percent of all pregnant teenage girls do not finish high school. Despite a current law that makes par ents financially responsible for children under age 18, Farabee said many teen mothers are being forced to seek public assistance for herself and her child or go without any financial support. Farabee also sponsored a bill that would amend the Controlled Substance Act to reduce the proliferation of "speed labs" and designer drugs. The bill, adopted on a 28-0 vote, would require chemical manufacturers and retailers to keep records of sales transactions of certain "raw" chemicals used in the manufacture of methamphe- tamines. Farabee said the measure would allow law enforcement agencies to find out who is buying the chemicals and trace them to the illegal manufacturing facilities. The bill would also reduce the manufacture of illegal designer drugs that can be made legal by slight changes in their chemical makeup. The bill adopts language in current federal law that makes illegal any drug that is substantially similar in chemical makeup and has the same effect as the controlled drug. The Senate also unanimously adopted the House-passed Tax Equity Commission, which will conduct a comprehensive study of the state tax system and make recommendations for possible changes. "In today's changing economy ... we need to study what would be in the best interests of the state as a whole," said Sen. Grant Jones, D-Temple, the bill's sponsor. The Senate added an amendment providing that the lieutenant governor and House speaker jointly choose the commission's chairman. Survey: Americans Favor Contraceptive Ads on TV By Aurelio Kojas LOS ANGELES (UPI)—A majority of Americans believe television portrays sex as "all fun and no risk" and that broadcasters should encourage the use of contraceptives, a Harris Poll commissioned by Planned Parenthood says. Planned Parenthood Federation of America will use the findings of the poll in an effort to influence the television networks to broadcast contraceptive commercials, President Faye Wattleton told a news conference Wednesday. Seventy-four percent of the respondents favored contraceptive advertising on television after being reminded that the surgeon general had called for the increased use of condoms to reduce the spread of AIDS. Sixty-three percent ofthe 1,250 adults surveyed nationwide Jan. 28-Feb. 1 said they believed that most television programs give the impression that sex is "all fun and no risk." Wattleton said 64 percent of those polled believe that watching television encourages teenagers to be sexually active and contributes to the fact that the United States has the highest teen pregnancy rate of any industrialized country—more than 1 million a year. "We know that the networks air more than 20,000 sexual references in one year, but birth control is mentioned only on rare occasions," Wattleton said. "Consequently, the message our teenagers get is that sex is fun and exciting, but that there are no consequences to worry about." The survey also found that 83 percent of Americans believe TV exaggerates the importance of sex. Wattleton said it also rebuts the contention of many local television stations and the three major networks that have refused to air commercials for contraceptives on the grounds they would offend viewers. "Our poll shows that a clear majority of Americans, 60 percent, believe that television stations should be allowed to air contraceptive advertising," she said. "Sixty-four percent disagree with the statement that contraception is too controversial to be mentioned in television programs, and a large majority of the American public—72 percent—would not be offended by contraceptive advertising on television." The survey reported that "... there is more support for contraceptive advertising than there is for the advertising of beer and wine (53 percent to 45 percent), and for feminine hygiene sprays (58 percent to 39 percent), both of which are frequently advertised on television." Wattleton called on the networks to show a more realistic picture of the world in their programming and commercials, and said the networks were "completely out of step with the great majority of the American people" on the subject of contraception. Wattleton said that only 11 percent of Americans have a religious or moral objection to birth control and family planning. Neighborhood Sports Sports News from Montrose & Community Groups HMorris Stays On Top of Houston Tennis Club Ladder Andrew Morris defended his No. 1 ranking in recent Houston Tennis Club action with a 6-1. 6-1, 6-4 victory over No. 2 Mark Pack. Pack went on to defend his No. 2 position with a 6-4, 6-2 win over No. 6 Spike Siegel. In other action Mike Houston defeated No. 10 Rich Corder 6-3,3-6.7-6 (7-2). Corder was able to defeat Armi Alabanza 3-6, 6-3, 6-3. No. 14 Ronnie Moss won over Randy Lunsford 6-4,6-4. New challenger Thalia Thompson fell to Gary Schwartz 6-4,7-5. Shawn Paulk held onto his No. 13 ranking with a 6-2. 6-4 defeat over Schwartz. Lunsford met the challenge from Eff Reyes for the No. 16 rung of the singles ladder 7-5, 6-2. New doubles team Mark Pack and Spike Siegel took over the No. 2 doubles ranking from Bruce Willis and Rich Corder. 6-2, 6-2. The club is making good use of the early spring weather with some good challenge matches during regular club play from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Sundays and 7:30-9:00 p.m. Wednesdays. For more inforamtionon the Houston Tennis Club, call Rich at 524-2151. HGarage Sale to Benefit Tournament A Trash & Treasure Garage Sale will be held in the parking lot of The 611 on March 28-29, 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. Donations will help sponsor the Houston Billiards Invitational to be held May 23-25, 1987. Persons needing items picked up may call 529-7438 or 772-2895. The Montrose Voice If s The Place to Advertise IS BACK!! Now Open: Daily 4pm-2am; Sat. & Sun. noon-2am We're not ready but we're open! We Hope Houston's ready! To Celebrate, Join Us For Happy Hour All Day/All Night Fri. March 20- Thurs. March 26 2517 Ralph Street at Westheimer 527-9071 It's fine to park across the street at Ralph's parking lot until ours Is finished.
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