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Montrose Voice, No. 16, February 13, 1981
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Montrose Voice, No. 16, February 13, 1981 - File 001. 1981-02-13. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 1, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/8629/show/8608.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1981-02-13). Montrose Voice, No. 16, February 13, 1981 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/8629/show/8608

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 16, February 13, 1981 - File 001, 1981-02-13, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 1, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/8629/show/8608.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 16, February 13, 1981
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 13, 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Fundamentalists plan maior aHack on San Francisco Montrose Voice · ISSUE #16, PUBLISHED WEEKLY Music profile: Chet Atkins, ''I VIas lucky'' Friday February 13, 1981 Good Evening Latest on the Arts Fest and the McCoy trial-inside plus Art, Movies, Corntnentaries, Theater, P ople & Places--ins·de ,. ' PACE 2 J MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 13, 1981 Trademark, © 1981 Houston Muscle & Power Co. ''Where the world meets Houston'' Jo6 Avondllle/Houston, Te-.s 77006/(7!3) 530-9767 We honor American Express, Carte Blanche, Diners Club, Visa and Mastercard. FEBRUARY 13, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 3 Trial date set for McCoy A May 11 date has been picked for the trial of a Hous­ton police officer accused of negilent homicide in the shooting death of gay rights activist Fred Paez. State District judge J.D. Guyon selected the date after refusing Friday, Feb. 6, to throw out the indictment against Officer Kevin McCoy. McCoy's lawyers had asked Guyon to quash the indictment on the grounds that it did not accuse McCoy of committing a specific crime. Lee Harrington, a member of the Fred Paez Task Force, which conducted its own investigation into the killing, said they would hold a com­munity meeting at 3:00PM Sunday, March 8 "for the purpose of giving the Task Force an opportunity to make a progress report in its efforts so far." The Oct. 15, 1980 indict­ment says McCoy, "while under the influence of an alcoholic beverage, placed a cocked, loaded pistol against the head of [Pae~) and as a result thereat said pistol dis­charged," killing Paez. The misdemeanor charge is punishable by a year in prison and a $2000 fine. Pro­secutor Brian Rains said the case is being tried in felony court because McCoy was a public official. Paez was an administra­tive assistant for the Gay Political Caucus when he was shot June 27, 1980. A grand jury investigation had prompted the charges of negligent homicide against the 25-year old officer. McCoy was relieved of official duty but with pay after being indicted. Paez served as office secre­tary for GPC, an appointed position, and encountered McCoy at a warehouse where the officer was work­ing an off-duty security job. McCoy. a four-year police verteran, said Paez made sexual advances toward him in an alley, and, in the alleged attempt to arrest him, the officer's gun discharged. McCoy admitted drinking beer the night of the killing but denied beinR intoxicated. Reward oHered in murder case The family of a Houston teenage girl who was raped and strangled is offering a $1000 reward for informa­tion leading to the arrest and indictment of suspects in her killing, the Houston Chroni­cle reported Feb. 10. Cynthia.. Darlene Johnson, 18, of 935 Shawnee, was last known to have been seen New Year's Eve at the Copa Disco, 2631 Richmond. Her body. which had been raped, was found in a field in the 9600 block of Carsondale Road in southeast Houston about lO:OOAM the next morning, said homicide detective S.J. Garza. Friends said they saw her leave the club alone in her 1979 Mustang Cobra, white with a green stripe down the hood and trunk. The car was found wrecked and aban-doned on the service road of the 8600 block of the Gulf Freeway near the Monroe exit, about a mile from where the body was found. She was wearing blue jeans, a light blue wind­breaker, a light blue sleeve­less vest and a red print short-sleeved shirt. She was 5 feet 5 inches tall, had brown hair and brown eyes and weighed about 124 pounds. Garza said detectives are investigating the possibility her murder may be linked to other rape/killings here. The bodies of three other women have been found along road­sides in recent months near Houston. Persons with information about the case were asked to call Garza or Detective D.W. Autry at 222-3651. The MONTROSE VOtC:f: is pubhshed weekly. Offices: 3520 Montrose. suite 227. Houston. TX 77006- Phone (713) 529-8490. Contents r.npyn~ht 1981 OH1cr hour~: nnon~ 7pm . ~DMIN1STRATIVEIEDITOR1~L Henry McCiur)(. publishertrdilnr. F.d Martine1., associate edatnr. Subscribm.M membrrs ur San Frandscu <;:h~uni.r.le FPRturrs and Surhurhan ff"Riures nf NPwspaper f.nterpra~r Assucuttum J'C)STMASTER: SPnd addrrU r.nrrer.tif!ns to 3520 Mnntrn!\e, ~UIIf' 227. Hnus· tun. TX 77006. Sub~cripiHIO rniP In liS: S29 prr year. 52 iS!'iUP!Ii, nr S19 rnr SIX mnnths. 26 IS!\UP!\ ~DVERT1S1NG Randy Brown, advrrtuun~ director Advrrtasin~ dradlinr Tuf"t~dAys. 7:00 p.m !\"atwnal advrrflsan)( reprrsrnt.tiJvr: R1vrndrll Markrtin)(, Nrv. Yurk Montrose News Formal request made to close Westheimer Several Montrose business owners appeared before Houston City Council Wednesday, Feb. 11, to for­mally ask for the closing of Westheimer Road betweem Bagby and Montrose for the Westheimer Colony Arts Festival. Warren Duncanson of Byman's Furniture made the request to the mayor and council members. Duncanson said he had talked with political leaders "everywhere" soliciting their help in convincing Houston City Council to authorize the street closing. "We talked to Debra Dan­burg (state representative from Montrose) and Mickey Leeland (U.S. representative from the area) and even tried to talk to Vice President George Bush." Duncanson said both Dan­burg and Leeland offered their moral support even though the issue is strictly in the jurisdiction of the city government. City Council said it would make a study of the request. Mayor jim McConn had said that the city ~auld clast off Westheimer during the festival "if we can legally do it (but) if it violates city ordi­nance, no." In past years, city govern­ment head s have made nm-ilar statements but the street Margulies has yet to be closed for the twice-a-year festival. The arts festival is nor­mally held every six months but was .not staged last time. Association president jerry Vann and six others appeared before Houston City Council jan. 28 to ask for permission to use the city's right of way between the sidewalk and the street, a routine request they make each time which is expected to be later approved. They did not at that jan. 28 meeting ask for permission to have Westheimer closed off but the subject came up then anyway. "If it means changing our ordinances, we should tell them we'll do it. If we're not going to cooperate and change the ordinances, we should tell them now," said council member Lance Lalor, who represents District C, which includes Montrose. "We Always keep them dangling," he said. City Attorney Ed Cazares was asked to act promptly in determing if city ordinances concerning street closings for such events would have to be changed, and "if it means changing some ordi­nances we can go ahead and do it," Lalor said. Association members have ma~ th~ o~u~ ~ the last five years. The festival normally stretches for ten blocks from Bagby to Montrose and draws hundreds of thou­sands of people into the area. Republic of Texos Savings moving Republic of Texas Savings Association will move its home offices out of Montrose March 1 to new corporate headquarters in southwest Houston. The savings and loan com­pany has made 1001 West­heimer its home office for about seven years. The company has six branches in Houston and one in Port Arthur. Allied Ame ricon Bank plans fall finish Allied American Bank expects its new four-story contruction at 1500 Waugh to be completed in September. The new addition, along with renovation of the exist­ing two-story building, will more than double the bank's -.!- ...__ ~-.~-,--- - they said. SAY. ~D. DOES THIS LOOK MORE LlKE. A S1X a{ AN E!G'HT TO YOO ? ... WOOLD YOO SAY THIS IS ASEVEN O~ANlN'E? .. , IS 11-HS SUPPOSED TO 'BE A ONE OR A SEVEN?... CAN YOU TELL IF TillS'S A S1X ~ A. FlVB? ... DO YOO ~AD THIS AS A NlNB ~AN EIGHT? ....... , .... PAGE 4 I MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 13, 1981 Texas Gay News County AHorney ~dmits to presence of gay political power DALLAS-A court docu­ment recently filed on behalf of the state in the lawsuit seeking to overturn the Texas sodomy statute has paid a considerable compli­ment to the political success of the gay rights movement, said the Texas Human Rights Foundation. Dallas County Attorney Henry Wade, in a motion for summary judgement before a Dallas federal judge, report-edly said, "The gay rights movement seemed to exer­cise a considerable amount of influence in the 1980 elec­tion, thus opening an avenue of approach to the state legis­lature to address the feasibil­ity for the continued need to proscribe homosexual conduct." Wade reportedly con­tinued, arguing for the neces­sity of laws against private homosexual acts between consenting adults, citing "the deaths and abuse of young men by homosexuals and violence associated with homosxual conduct in general." Wade was said to have described sodomy as "abomi­nable and detestable crime against nature." The trial, seeking to deter­mine the constitutionality of section 21.06 of the Texas Penal Code defining A message for Montrose business owners: homosexual acts as illegal, is scheduled to convene June 15 in Dallas. The Texas Human Rights Foundation said it has many expert witnesses lined up to do battle with Wade. The suit was filed by Donald F. Baker, currently the president of the Dallas Gay Political Caucus and a former Dallas public school teacher. The Texas statute applies exclusively to homosex- We're the Montrose Voice. uality. Baker filed the suit in 1979. The Texas Human Rights Foundation is an organiza­tion headed by Houston attorney Mort Schwab. The group's phone number here is 526-9139. "Contributions to support this undertaking are tax deductible as the foundation was awarded charitable, tax exempt status by the IRS in 1978," the organization said. We're the weekly community newspaper for your neighborhood, read by 10,000* people each issue. We reach the full spectrum of Montrose, including the large, influential, economically­powerful gay population. And the Montrose Voice is growing rapidly. Soon, we'll be issuing new estimated readership figures. There'll never be a better time than now to team your business up with the Voice. More and more businesses in Montrose are discovering the Voice-quite simply because we offer effective, low cost advertising in our neighborhood. Montrose is maturing. For the first time'ever, our neighborhood has a real communit)' newspaper. And in regard to advertising, we do what a newspaper does better than an)' other type of publication-reach large amounts of the right people for very little advertising cost. The Montrose Voice reaches one-fourth the population of the total neighborhood each week. And our fourth, we belie~·e. is the preferred fourth. The fourth that is more politically-aware and community-minded. The fourth more likely to have a good job and have the money to spend with you. Advertising rates in the Montrose Voice, like any good newspaper, are surprisingly inexpmsive. For example: an ad the physical size of this flyer is $109 (or less) in the Voice. An ad about the size of a business card is $19 (or less) in the Voice. Directory listings are available at $8 an inch. (These rates valid until March 15.) Join us this week and take the opportunity to tell our 10.000 )oval readers, our one­fourth of Montrose, about your business. Call Randy Brown, advertising director, 529-8490. Office hours noon-7pm. The Montrose Voice Dependable, effective, inexpensive advertising for Montrose "'l'h" '''llmal!·d w•·•·l..h n·ad<•r,hrp lr~11n· .IIHI all ollwr lt~llr<'' and n·ad<·r,hrp Ia< lor' .on·'" 1omprkd I" :'l<lorllro'<· \'oi«· r<'"'ardt and w<·n· dk!ll\1' for J.m l.i .. I!JKI. .ond ·"' "'h)<'< 1 10 '"nr' qualrlicauon< .\nual weeki) di•mbu1ion· ·1000 mpi<''· :\\crOtl/:1' n·llnn' . ~90 "'i''"'· .\" ·rOt~<' 111'1 < rr< ill.uron 1i10. hum01u·d pa"·oll ralt'. 2.!! humart•d an·ragt· n·adt·r,h•p: IO.itiO wt·<·l..h FEBRUARY 13, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 5 Find a MAN at the Largest C& W bar in Houston Tuesdays BEER BUST 7pm till? Sundays BEER BUST 4pm till ? with live band Live Band ==-AVAr)l Tht .... c~ft)'..­Friday and . starting 6 Saturday, 9pm to lam In our Cabaret, we proudly present Linda Petty live Feb 13 through 15, 9PM-1AM also Feb. 19 & 20 Hours: Noon-2am 7 days a week Happy Hour 4pm .. 7pm Monday-Friday No Cover Thursday, Friday, Saturday 2700 Albany (security parking) • 529-7848 PAGE 6 I MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 13, 1981 National Gay News Fundamentalists plan maior attack on San Francisco SAN FRANCISCO-Calling San Francisco the "Sodom and Gomorrah" of the nation, a coalition of fundamentalist groups, which includes local Moral Majority members, said it will spend $3 million on a media campaign attack­ing homosexuals-as soon ss the "explosive" repercus­sion• from their initial announcement subsides, they said. Monday, Feb. 9, in a televi­sion interview. Gay people here, and in other cities, have complained in recent months of an increase in violence against them by homophobes and some have expressed con­cern that the planned cru­sade will heighten tensions. "It certainly is a situation of grave concern," AP quoted Richard McQueen, editor of The Advocate, a nationally­circulated gay newspaper based in nearby San Mateo. "It sounds like things could get pretty ugly," the editor added. The Moral Majority apparently mailed leaflets to the newspaper's advertisers. According to Zone, whose "In God We Trust Inc." group is spearheading the cam­paign, $3 million will be spent, beginning with a mail and media blitz. The group announced no legislative lobbying efforts, either to make homosexual acts illegal or to replace existing anti-discrimination laws. But organizers said they would watch lawmak­ers in Sacramento for any legislation they feel favors gay people. Harry Britt, an openly-gay city supervisor [council­man), was quoted by the news service as saying, "If they think they have a chance in San Francisco, they don't know this town." Wycoff lead a successful campaign last year in conser­vative Santa Clara County, forty miles south of San Francisco, that defeated two proposed gay rights ordinances. The coalition said it will buy advertisements to build anti-gay feeling in the com­munity and attempt to per­suade homosexuals to give up their lifestyle. "I agree with capital pun­ishment, and I believe homosexuality is one of those that could be coupled with murder and other sins," Dean Wycoff, a spokesman for the Santa Clara Moral Majority, one of the groups involved, was quoted as saying. Congressman arrested on sodomy charge, plans resignation After that quote was broadcast on San Francisco television, the Rev. Richard Zone, a partner of Wycoff in the proposed campaign, said he received death threats himself. He blamed it on the television station. We will start our campaign after "the explosive after­shocks of what KRON-TV did with our interviews can die down," Zone was quoted as saying. Wycoff was said to have called San Franci-sco "the Sodom and Gomorrah of the United States and the armpit of this perverted movement." San Francisco has one of the highest-perhaps the highest-concentration of gay people in the world. The Rev. Charles Mclll­henny of San Francisco's First Orthodox Presbyterian Church joined Wycoff in denouncing homosexuality, saying "according to the Scrir,tures, it is against the law. "We want to minister 'to homosexuals and win them to Christ and stop their sin­ning," he reportedly said WASHINGTON, D.C.-U.S. Congressman jon Hinson, a second-term Mississippi Republican charged here in early February on a misde­meanor charge of "attempted sodomy," intends to resign, an aide said Monday, Feb. 9. Administrative aide Mar­shall Hanbury told the Jock­son Daily News by tele­phone, "We're in the process of getting the paperwork done now." Hinson, personally, had refused to make any com­ment on the subject. Meanwhile, at the request of a member of the San Fran­cisco Board of Supervisors (city council), the clerk of the board there will prepare and send "a letter of condolence" to Hinson. The letter was requested by Supervisor Carol Ruth Silver, who criticized Washington police for "sneaking around" in search of homosexual activity in a public men's room. She said they should spend their time dealing instead with violent crime. U.S. House Republican leaders joined in the chorus urging the 38-year-old and slightly pudgy congressman Outdoor stairways cannot be 1gnored the way those indoors are. Inside the house a stairway may develop a squeak but it isn't likely to fall down. Outside, wind and rain take the•r toll of stairs. Even if you never used the stair­way it would need attention. Regular maintenance and more frequent repairs are necessary whatever the material in use - wood. concrete or brick. to resign. A spokesman for the two leaders said neither had had direct contact with Hinson, who was arrested with 28-year-old Harold Moore in a men's room­room 1422-at the House Longworth Building across the street from the Capitol Wednesday afternoon, Feb. 4. Moore was said to be a Library of Congress employee from suburban Oxon Hill, Md. Two other men were arrested two hours earlier at the same location, police announced. They were iden­tified as Kerry Lee jones, 36, an employee of the Demo­cratic Study Group, and Jet­ton Scott Douglas, 28, a consultan,t lobbyist. They were charged with "oral and rectal sodomy." Hinson initially posted $2000 bond that afternoon to prevent himself from having to spend the night in jail. The other three men reportedly remained in cus­tody until the next day. Hinson entered Washing­ton Sibley Hospital for coun­seling and treatment after pleading innocent to the charge. A spokesman for GOP Hcuse Leader Robert H. Michel said that Michel thinks "it would be in the best interests of all con­cerned" if Hinson resigned, AP reported. GOP Whip Trent Lott, also a Mississip· pian, was quoted by the news agency as saying, "I am extremely disappointend in jon Hinson and feel he should resign." Hinson's staff said the con­gressman voluntarily entered a Washington hospi­tal for counseling and treat­ment for "intense emotional and physical exertion." Superior Court judge Wil­liam Thompson scheduled a jury trial for May 4 for both Hinson and Moore and released the two men on per­sonal recognizance. Both were originally charged with "oral sodomy," a felony, but the U.S. District Attorney's office reduced the chargfs to "attempted sod­omy," a misdeameanor. They said this was standard procedure when both parties appear to be consenting adults. W.O. Mounger of jackson, a leading Republican finan­cial contributor, said Hinson was "sick" and had no option but to resign. "We trusted him, nnd he just didn't play the game This Old Montrose House Wooden stairs, naturally, shol!ld be checked frequent­ly for signs of weakness and decay . Examine the stringers (the s1des that hold the steps) for crackmg. You can strengthen a stringer by bolting an additional piece of wood along its length Use a 2x4 or a 2x6 and use carriage bolts to fasten it Nails might cause further splitting. Treads (the part of the step you put your feet on) are attached to the stringer by cleats fastened to the insid.e of th~ stringer or by grooves cut into the stringer. Loose cleats can be tight­ened with new screws. Badly damaged or decayed cleats should be replaced. If the wood around grooves has started to sphnter or decay. . retnforce with cleats When dotng th1s ktnd of work, remove the tread carefully Tap hghtly on the unders1de of each end to avo1d cracktng. When you straight with us," Mounger said. Washington Deputy Police Chief Gilbert Abernathy said the men's room was under police surveillance following an alleged tip that it was the scene of homosexual activity. Hinson is the congressman who last fall, during his ree­lection campaign, admitted being arrested in 1976 at the Iwo jima Memorial, a popu­lar cruising spot in surbur­ban Arlington, on a charge of .. committina an obscene act." The charge was later reduced to "creating a public nui­sance" and he was said to have paid a $100 fine. Also he revelaed that on Oct. 24, 1977, he was one of four survivors at a Washing­ton theater specializing in gay movies when it caught fire. Nine people died in the fire. After these earlier instan­ces came to light last year, Hinson held a press confer­ence in jackson, with his wife at his side, and asked the public to support his re­election campaign, announc­ing, "I am not, never have been and never will be a homosexual." Mississippi voters then re­elected him. Hinson lives in surburban Alexandria, Va. with his wife. replace the tread, renail completely. . Treads should be replaced 1f hadly worn. If a tread is worn slightly at the center get extra wear out of it by turning it over. Look for cracks in con­crete steps. Open them w1th a hammer and chisel so that all loose concrete 1s cleaned out Fill with fresh concrete after wettmg the surface Make the crack w1der at the bottom than at the surface Wet 1t for the next few days FEBRUARY 13, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 7 GAY MOVIES ON VIDEOTAPE Largest Selection In the Southwest Best Priees An~where Regular SJ4f9S movies DOWS'Jf'S Regular s99" movies nowssf'S Join our Trade-A-Tape Club Trade in ~our ga~ tapes and · pureli e new une-S fur s4ooo e~hange l:l szqqs e~hange Larce selection of regular x-rated movies S79'5 U •5995. Good Selecdon of rental x-rated movies only ••o. Join our Rent-A-Tape Club and rent all the latest regular movies, sueh· as ''Urban Cowbo~,'' ''Xanadu,'' ''Frida~ the Uth,'' ete. Commentary Patterns on the Potomac: Perspective By Ed Martinez Last week Bonzo (our esteemed president, Mr. Rea­gan. After all, if we lose the right to laugh at and make fun of our politicians, or anyone else, for that matter, what's America all about?) gave us our first lesson in applied Reaganomics. We learned that America is in the worst mess since the Depression, that it is all the fault of the Democrats and all the rest of, by implication, the commie pinko hippie fags, or whatever it is they're calling the far left these days. Further, we were told that everyone, that is, but eve­ryone will have to bite the bullet, that there will be drastic, if not Draconian, ~udget cuts in federal spend­mg. tax cuts for all, and after a couple of years, we'll all live happily ever after. Did you get that? We'll oil live happily ever after. The implication of Bonzo's address, filled with props, charts, enough sincerity to make you throw up, and, most of all, Ronnie Reagan in his biggest role, President of the United States, is that America has been selfish and self-indulgent for too many years and now the bill is due, and judgment day can no longer be put off. Boo, hiss, shame, shame, bad old Democrats for getting us in this mess. Bullshit! The facts that Bonzo either does not know or is unwil­ling to consider are that America has been experienc­ing the greatest economic boom in the history of any nation in the history of man. In the process, she suc­cumbed to a touch of national megalomania, and assumed that what is good fort he Uni­ted States is good for eve­ryone. She went to war, after her glorious victory with her Allies in World War Two twice; once in Korea and one~ in Vietnam, to prove forcibly by war that America's brand of democracy was good for everyone, whether they thought so or not. We know all too well the lamentable results of those two military adventures. Korea made us wonder about ourselves, and Vietnam threw us into the worst inflationay spiral in our history, one that is still going on. However, let it be said right here and now that these same mugwumps and know­nothings that are flapping the1r wmgs and screaming their hawklike cries around Reagan right now are the same assholes that were humping for increases in spending in Vietnam under that other great Republican, Richard Nixon. The military industrial complex was mak- PAGE 8 I MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 13, 1981 ing huge and obscene profits out of the war, and everyb­ody was getting a bellyful of good old American patrio­tism Unfortunately, that war almost bankrupted us, economically and morally. Thank you, Lyndon Johnson and Tricky Dick Nixon, not to mention Dr. Stangelove (Henry Kis.singer) and his able flunky, Alexander Haig. Why does that name sound so familiar? It does keep cropping up, doesn't it? Well, as the French say, the more things change, the more they remain the slime. So America wanted what it got, the transformation from a society after World War II when people were lucky and grateful to have one car to one in which prac­tically every family member has his or her own car. We are so damned affluent and selfish, so divorce, drug, and abortion prone that we are incapable of thinking of our­selves as a nation anymore. Letters Ray Hill announces quest for GPC post The following is an open Jeuer from Houston gay ac!JVJS! Ray Hill received at !he Voice The November 1980 elections were from the perspective of civil and human right causes, a disaster. However, things are never quite as bad as they seem nor qulle as good from anyone's perspective. After watching the opening session of the Texas ~egislature and exchanging mformation with observers in Washmgton, D.C., I see no immediate cause for alarm. The state and national political climate does however justify a reordermg of priorities and some fresh defensive and offensive strategies. Further the various elements of the gay and lesbian movement are going to need all the available energy they can gather for the tasks at hand. We can no longer afford the expensive loss of enerRv We are simply a conglomera­tion 0f indi'l.dual eg.:~s, shouting louder and louder "Me, Me, Me!" So let's not throw down on Mr. Carter, Mr. Johnson, or other departed politicos. They only gave us exactly what we the American peo­ple wanted. Now, as Mr. Rea­gan has so correctly pointed out, the bill is due. But let's also not put the hat where i des not belong, as incum­ent Republicans are so fond of doing. We, each and every individual American, are directly and totally responsi­ble for our problems to date. And no simple-minded grade B celluloid cowboy with a handful of flip charts and tin­sel smiles is going to change that. Only America, individ­ually and collectively, will do that. Or will continue to lie on her back with a whine and a scream refusing to make individual sacrifices for the collective good. used in working at cross purposes and duplications of effort. We can no longer afford the category of emiritus leadership. Those with skills and talents to devote to the cause should return from their lofty retirements and assume working roles within the community. None of us is too good to execute the will of the organizations serving our communities, nor are our personal and private affairs so important that we cannot share our experience for the benefit of the community. Toward that end I am announcing my candidacy for vice presidency of Houston Gay Political Caucus. I hope to be assigned the responsib i lity of recruiting and training new talent for future leadership. I support the direction of the established leadership and pledge my commitment to the democratically esta­blished will of the Caucus. I challenge the other members of the Texas' elite corps of organization founders and former title holders to report to their various groups for assign­ment. (signed) Ray Hill Montrose Theater Live Theater This Week Near Montrose 520..0055 James Baldwin's The Amen Corner Friday and Saturday evening~ and Sunday after­noon. Equinox Theater-3617 Waah­lnston- 868-5828 (Friday, Feb. 13, through Ronald Ribman's Cold Storage Thursday, Feb.19) (drama] starring Michael (Nina Vance) AUey Theater Fletcher, Joel Kenyon and Mary­( larp atase)-815 Texaa-228- belle Chaney, Friday, Saturday, 8341 Wednesday and Thursday Thomas Babe's Fathers and evenings. Sons (drama] starring Alan Hamman Hall-Rice Univenity Feinstein and Barbara Ander- c:.mpue-527·<10<10 son, Friday evening. Saturday What the Butler Saw Friday and afternoon and evening, Sunday Saturday evenings. afternoon and evening, and Main Street Tbeater-Autny Tuesday through Thursday House, 8285 Main-524-8708 evenings. W. Somerset Maugham's 1926 (Nina Vance) AUey Theater'• comedy The Constant Wife star­Arena Stase-815 Texaa-228· ring Shelia Mahew, Charles 83U Tanner, Ted Luedemann and Gordon Dryland's Think of Polly Macintyre Saturday Afr~ca pr1vate rehearsed read- afternoon and evening. ing Monday. Tower Theater-1201 Weal· Chocolate Bayou Theater-1823 heimer-522-2452 Lamar-758-88<10 The Best Little Whorehouse in Keith MacGregor's Renovallons Texas (musical comedy] Friday (world premiere] Fr~day and evening, Saturday afternoon Saturday evemngs. and evening, Sunday afternoon Comedy Workahop Cabaret and and evening, and Tuesday the Comix Annex-1805 S. through Thursday evenings. Shepherd-524-7333 . Vaudeville Theater-308 Anythmg for a Laugh Friday, Mllam-227-4477 Saturday. Tuesday. Wednesday Something Old Is New Again and Thursday evenings. Friday, Saturday, Tuesday, The Enaemble-1010 Tuam- Wednesday and Thursday Seibert On Backgammon By JAMES SEIBERT Copley News Service Wbite to play 3-1. Tbe doabliDg cabe ill not iD ue. II..ACK WHITE This situation conems it­self primanly w1th slotting. Wb1te's blot on the 16 pomt must be moved to safety now or h1s timing and game­plan go right out of the wm· dow Should white elect to shut down the 5-point (8/5, 6/5) cover be becomes vul­nerable on two shots, one di· reel and one indirect. If e1· tber blot is bit (50 percent) white must swttcb to a back· game. Backgames beautiful­ly timed and expertly exe­cuted are losmg propos1t1ons the maJority of the time. The ~pomt is always n1ce, but evenmgs. ngbt now thre are more pressing matters. Playing 16113 takes care of the three. Where to play the one is the question. Generally speaking, slot men from your top-heavy points (a point with four or more men stacked up on it) duplicate whenever and wherever possible, and last­ly, diversify your own good numbers. In this case slott­ing the ~point is inadvisable as it strips the &-point of builders. The point that is very top-heavy is the 24- point. The man sitting on top of white's anchor on the 24- point is virutally out of play and should be brought down to the 23-point. This play will diversify some of white's rolls. Threes are now play­able to the 20-point as well as fours and a lucky 4-3 shuts it down. There is one additional ad­vantage to having a blot-an­chor combination in your op­ponent's inner table. The blot becomes a fly in the ointment. Very few pips are gained by black (lost by white) should the blot be bit. Specific combintions of dice are required to bit and cover and usually "kllhng" two men in the process, i.e. tak­mg them out of play by pusb­mg them up aga1nst the 24- polnt, and black must now be very careful how he moves in hts mnter table and outer table as the blot is a free agent already thrown to the wolves Tbe points are numbered I to 24 starting witb white's bome board at tbe lower rigbt. A move, for example, from tbe 9-point to tbe 4- point Is written 9/ 4. 9/4• iD­dlcates, in addition, tbat a man was bit on lbe 4-point. 9/ 4(2) means tbat two men were moved to tbe 4-point. :EBRUARY 13, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 9 WINTER CLEARANCE SALE R ENTIRE INVENTORY A D MORE ON SELECTED ITEMS. fine furnishings and en11fronmental designs for purely personal tastes Joins in the attitude of Be Yourself and Not By Yourself Get ready to celebrate our Mardi Gras Party next weekend Saturday, Feb. 21 Food, party favors, $1.25 double drinks & 604 double schnapps all night. costumes will be appreciated 'lll.h~l"~~"llo. FEATURING QATOII'I 0.1 COY£ Happy Hour 4-7 Everyday! Double Shots of Schnapps 754 Everyday! Hot-Hot-Music Everyday I Coming Soon-the Pump Room, for men only 327 Westheimer at Taft, 526-7258 .no cover Montrose Art Art This Week in Montrose (Friday, Feb. 13, through Thursday, Feb. 19) Contemporary Arts Muaeum- 5219 Montroee Blvd.-528-3129 The New Photography in the Downstairs Gallery and Ansel Adorns and the West photo­graphy exhibiticn in the Upstairs Gallery all day Friday and Saturday, plus Sunday afternoon and daily Tuesday­Thursday. (Alfred C.) Gl•aaell School of Art- 5101 Montroee Student exhibition all day Fri­day plus Saturday morning and daily Monday-Thursday. H• rria G•llery-1100 Biaaon­net- 522-9118 Works by Tony Bass, daily except Monday. XXX. Moody G• llery- 2015-J W. Gr• y-528-9811 Assorted artists daily Friday, Saturday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. Museum of Fine Arta- 1001 Biuonnet- 528-1381 The Boston Tradition: Ameri­can Paintings from the Museum of Fine Arts of Boston in the Upper Brown Gallery; Theophile-Alexandre Steinlen: Illustrator in the Library Gal­lery; Honore Doumier Prints from the Collection in the Romansky Galleries; early Chi­nese art selections from the Asia House Rockefeller Collec­tion in the Lovett Oriental Gal­lery; and Impressionist and Post-Impressionist select ions PAGE 10 I MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 13, 1981 from the Beck collection in the Jones Gallery; open all day Fri­day and Saturday, plus Sunday afternoon, and daily Tuesday­Thursday. Robins on G•lleriea - 1200 Biaaonnet-521-9221 Show by 10 artists daily Friday. Saturday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. Rothko Ch•pel-1409 Sui Rosa Mark Rothko paintings and Barnett Newman's Broken Obe­lisk sculpture. St. Thom.. Univeraity Art Dept. G•llery-3900 Yo•kum- 522-7911 ext. 292 Houston Women's Caucus for Art exhibition Friday; "Women and Their Work" exhibition opens Feb. 20. Wil dutter- 3517 Wu h lng­ton- 889-5151 Oil industry-related works daily Friday, Saturday, Tues­day, Wednesday and Thursday. Discover the power ol the little Montrose newspaper. The Montrose Voice now reaches over 10,000 people each week. Discover the power of ~our Classified or Director~ advertising in the Voice. 25e a word or $8 an Inch. See the current Issue. Discover the power of ~our own home subscription. {It'll make ~ou the most popular kid on the block.) $29 a year or $19 for sb~: months. Mall to Montrose Voice, )520 Montrose #227, Houston, TX 77006. Discover the power of ~our displa~ advertisement reaching our rapidl~­developing lo~al following. Call 529·8490 dally, noon·7pm. Yes. The Montrose Voice. The power·full little newspaper. FEBRUARY 13, 1981 I M ONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 11 Coming? Watch for time and date in this space A Montrose Area Restaurant at 708 W. Alabama 528-8245 (closed Sundays) Chicken Fried Steak, our perennial favorite entree, is now inclued on both lunch and dinner menus everyday. Breakfast begins at 7am Lunch at llam Dinner at 5pm Special at Breakfast: Homemade bisquits and sausage gravy · Getting away with a group, a friend or just by yoiii'Self. Let us help. Serving the travel needs of Montrose. • .. Yoar Travel Ellperts 522-1922 3205 Montrose Houston Day in, day out, year in, year out, Mary's satisfies. Beer busts Sunday 4-9 and Tuesday 9-midnight After-hours seven nights a week - ·- '- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ·- :J_ 1022 Westheimer PAGE 12 I MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 13, 1981 CLOTHING FROM 30s, 40s, 50s • COATS, SWEATERS • FORMALS, PARTY ATTIRE • MEN'S SUITS (from $14.95) • MEN'S SHIRTS & PLEATED PANTS • SHOES, HANDBAGS, JEWELRY • THE INEXPENSIVE WAY TO QUALITY CLOTHING e, Tue.-Sat. 11-6, ~.. ..~ Thursday till 8 V \9' ,;,e ~ ~~0 ~,~~~ o"- ~ (,~ :v'~~ ~~~~0 c,O~o~"~-'"' ~'i) (,~ 1409 Richmond • Houston (/ 'Kro-nt!/ n pi cronies: a dose friend, esp. of long standing) Le Bar 8c Cafe Lunch from 11:00. Dinner from 5:30 After-Hours from 11:30 Sunday Champagne Brunch noon-5:00pm Specials Daily 1322 Westheimer 522-1521 Spani1-h 9-fowe't (Chapultepec #2) Mexican Restaurant New haurs: IAM-1 0:30PM dally 3921 North Main 869-1706 HIGH ROlLIN 5KATE5 COUPON Buy one breakfast, lunch or dinner and get one free, up to $4.50 value. Clip this coupon. (j) r'> .0, i Mon. \h.-U: ~a\. 1\'.()() lc ~:()()PK- 100-1£5S" ; 0 0 Sa\e'l 0 dhd OR_en\al> 0 () j ~ Mr. ~b\e 'Pacer- rarraq"l..~ ta\-\>1-o S\(a\c.:. OYI \-\a\':}h-\ 5\ar'IIV.ee\e~ ~acy FEBRUARY 13, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 13 He changed country, seriously By ROBERTP. LAURENCE Copley News Service HOLLYWOOD - So this is the most influential man in Nashville? By reputation, yes. Serious fans of country music know Chet Atkins was the man who changed its sound, who eliminated the whiney fid­dles and brought in the softer, slicker sound of the piano, who added a midtown mood to country and thereby spread its appeal far beyond the rural South, who claimed jazz immortal Django Reinhardt as one of his most important influences, not country great Lester Flatt. But to hear Chet Atkins talk about himself, one gets the impression that he was just in the right place at the right time. And to meet him in a poolside hotel suite, he seems to be one more vaca­tioning corporation vice prestdent. He wears a blue Oxford· style shirt wtth a button· down collar. loose-fitting denims and a pa1r of loafers that appear to be made of very soft leather No alliga­tor hide cowboy boots, no carved silver belt buckle w1th mother-of-pearlmlays. He considers himself a musician first, but he is more important than most. The resemblance to a corpo­rate executive is more than wardrobe deep. Beginning in the early 19~0s as a guitarist at RCA's Nashville studios. he was later placed in charge of a new set of stu­dios and in 1968 was made vice president in charge of popular artists and reper­toire in Nashville. "I was lucky that I was there," he says of his ear!y days in Nashville. "I was lucky I was able to spot tal­ent in other people." A few of the people whose talent he discovered were Don Gibson, Floyd Cramer, Connie Smith, Dottie West, Roger Miller, Boots Ran­dolph and Roy Orbison. Of them all, he is proudest of Charley Pride. Nashville musician and record producer Jack Clement brought him a tape of Pride singing, Atkins re­called, and Atkins took the tape to a meeting of RCA ex­ecutives in Monterey. "I played it for them, and they all liked it. Then I told them Charley Pride was black. So there was a long discussion. This was the mid- 1960s, and a lot of people were afraid of boycotts in the Southern states. But we signed him, and there was never a problem. His first record, 'Snakes Crawl at Night,' was a big hit," Atkins related. "He surprised a lot of people." Atkins did not have the same luck with Willie Nel­son, who now records for Columbia Records and sells discs by the jillions. "We had him for several years, and couldn't make a success of him. It was tim-ing. the public wasn't ready for him. Of course. Willie has since gone in for this outlaw thing. He's very sharp about giving the public what it wants. Back then, he dressed like a banker." Atkins learned to play the guitar by ear, even though his father taught classical piano and voice, but eventu­ally he learned to read and to assiJililate a great variety of stylistic influences. He even learned to play a little classical guitar, and brought classical and jazz influences to country music. "What they call the 'Nash­ville sound' is now a lot more pop than I ever brought it," Atkins said of his own work. "We began to use jazz and classical sounds, trying to make coun­try music more palatable to more people. "If we hadn't done it, Elvis Presley would have killed country music. Back then. Elvis was the biggest thing ever to hit the industry. And all the guys like him, Gene Vincent, Carl Perkins and the rest. were doing OK. But real country musicians were 10 trouble. I even tried to smg rock 'n' roll for about a year. It was pretty rough," he said. shaking h1s head. Now. as befits his elder statesman status, the 56- year-old Atkins is generous in his praise of other guitar­ists. though he kids that he listens most to piano record~ ing, "so I can find something to borrow from without peo­ple knowing it." Liberace's flamboyance due to previous life, says "He was a very great com­poser and ptanist m hts llme in Warsaw and m France. He was 80 years old when he worked wllh Ltszt and a httle b!l younger when he worked wllh Chopm. Chopm was very mfluenhal m brtdgmg the gap between the two composers. Wmchell named Lucy as bemg a "Commte pmko." "In September of 1953 at the hetght of the w1tch hunt­mg era . .. Lucille Ball was accused by Walter Wmchell of havmg Commumst lean­mgs. It happend the very week the Lucy was gomg back mto producllon of I Love Lucy. It was the number one show m the country­begmmng tis thtrd season," satd Andrews. psychic Porhons by D1ck Maur1ce C1981 Copley News Servtce Accordmg to psychtc regres­swmst M1chael Forrest, Llbe­race was a cardma l m a former hfe m the Roman Cathohc Church around 1000AO. "Thts ts one of the reasons he enjoys dressmg up m flamboyant a titre," says For­rest, "and all the jewels. Over the past ten most recent ltfe­llmes, each hfe has always had a lot on longev1ty. Each hfe he has hved to be 80 or 90." The Las Vegas star does beheve m remcarnatwn and feels that he was Chopm or Ltszt m a former hfe. Not so clatms Forrest. "He was ahve at the !I me of Chopm and Ltszt. He was a mustc teacher of both of them. He has a very close att­achment to both of those composers. "Ltberace had a great tmpact on the mus1c of that lime, but behmd the scenes. Phd Donahue m Chtcago last Wednesday, Feb. 11, taped an mtervtew wllh Chuck Silver­Item about hts book Mon to Man, the story of gay male couples. Stlverstem earher co-authored Joy of Gay Sex. The atr date m Houston for the 9:00AM program on chan­nel 2 was not tmmedtately determmed, but shoud be at least a few weeks from now. We'll keep you posted. Can you tmagme Amertca's Ftrst Lady of Comedy, Luc1lle Ball, accused of bemg a Com­mums!? Well. tt's true. Bart Andrews, author of the new book, l.ovtng Lucy. told shocked hsteners on Otck Maurtce's radto show from Las Vegas that Walter How dtd Wmchell come up wtth the story? "Lucy had brought her grandpa out to Cahforma m the late '30s. He had soctahst leamngs. He got the enttre family to stgn cards stallng that they would vote the Commumst t1cket dunng the next elecllon. Just to please the old man, Lucy, along wtth her mother, brother and cou­sm. Signed the card . As 11 turned out seventeen years later. that card turned up. It was to haunt her for ten days until she was completely exonerated by a commts­ston." Andrews, Lucy's number one fan . clatms that tl could have been the end of her career. "It was somethmg because the enhre Destlu emptre, whtch was enormous, was on the verge of collapse all m one week of llme." Lucy never forgave Wmchell far domg that on h ts coast- to­coast show. What's tromc ts, years later. Dest Arnaz htred Wal­ter Wmchell to be the narra­tor for the TV show The Untouchables. Lucy dtdn't QUtle agree that Wmchell should do that job. But Dest convmced Lucy to forgtve and forget the past. But Ia thts day, she never QUite got over 11. Peter Marshall telhng Lola Falana at dmner at Del mom­co's at the Las Vegas Rtvtera hotel about the ttme he was workmg at the La fin Quarter w1th Sophie Tucker. One of the dancers had a voodoo doll of Tucker made and stuck ptns mto the doll's left leg. That mght, nght on stage, Sophte Tucker fell down and broke her left leg. Montrose notes: Lmda Petty playmg at Houston Country has re c etved glowtng Music People revtews-and countless standmg ovallons from her audtence. Among the nota­bles seen dtmng recently at Cromes were Mmnesota's Dr. Lloyd W1lhams and Brtan Dav1es of the Dtabel!c Foun­datiOn m London. They were staymg m town a t the Hous­ton Guest House. And T1m Weaver gets the credtt for the success of the Dta na Awards S h.o w t r y o u t s a t t he Cockatoo. L1ly Tomhn too k a break from her movte career to ful­ftll a hfelong dream. She har ­m om zed wtth Barry Manl­low on "The Last Duet." a tune for hts current album. Barry. Mamlow wanted Lily nght form the begmmng. When she agreed, they went mto the studto tmmedtately and recorded the song, wtth Barry dmng lrtple duty as vocal coach, producer and smger. PAGE 14 I MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 13, 1981 .. PRIVATE SPECIAL REGULAR POSTAL zg.ss a·oo FOR PER BOXES SIX MONTHS MONTH OFFEREXPIRESMARCH31,1981 ~ Bring this ad to KWIK-KALL MAILBOXES. ~ ~ 3317 MONTROSE. Offer limited to new customers only - not good for renewals. ~ Kwik·Kall 3317 MONTROSE ll'l'.!., ,.:{1):4 ~ 522-6939 You've tried the bars, baths 8c bookstores! Now try the exciting new service that Houston Gays are talking about! Don't be left out! LAMBDA lc COMP A Compatability Matching Service Join TODAY -$15, three months Hurry, rates are going up March 1st 5PM-IOPM Monday-Friday NOON-5PM Saturdays Closed Sundays (713)721-5583 A Texas Beer for • Texas Men •..- , I ·~ . Ask for it at your favorite Montrose club or storel Available in boHies, cans and draft 1612 Westheimer 1620 Commonwealth mon..-o::~,ar •• Yarn-o1pm, 523-2927 Jim Reed, specialist in auto keys and locks, is an expert in repair, re-key and maintenance services for all types of locks and fasteners. More Cooling Comfort Less Cooling Cost I ri tf\ H f§ li freezes energy costs 1®45 COINDITIO•NIIIIG & HEATING 3210 North Freeway 695-0695 With ~allsf1Pd Muntru~e tustumPrs. mcludm~ the VPntur.-r-;, R•t '• Hul• and thr Mulmtr Sun FEBRUARY 13, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 15 Looking over the fence By Holt Coafer Copley News Service Looking over the fence-the grass is always greener­- somewhere over the rain­bow- beyond the blue ·horizon are all phrases we use to infer "life" would be better some other place. Maybe it would. At least the thought it would is what helps keep us trying to improve ourselves. Then, again, maybe it wouldn't. And nothing des­troys the Shangri-la image of someone else's apparent good fortune like walking a mile in his moccasins. And while this is a rather philisophical beginning for a photo column, the thing that precipitated it was some recent discussions I had with a friend of mine. We got together a few weeks ago in order to lay out the chapters for a book on photo marketing. what subjects we should dis­cuss in each chapter, we found ourselves digressing occasionally to reflect on how we got from where we started to where we are now. Being a free-lance writer­photographer is not, as many suppose, another form of unemployment. We dis­covered that we were both asked with some degree of frequency, "Just when do you expect to get a full-time job?" ff you've never been in bus­inesa for yourself-a• you are when you write and take pictures full time-chances are you'll be dazzled by what appears to be the unusual tmount of freedom granted o a person who doesn't have o punch a clock every day. Your analysis is correct -there is a lot of freedom in this business. You don't have to go on assignments where the client wants to capture the sunrise. You don't have to stay late to get the sunset. You don't have to be at your typewriter between photo 1eaaion1 doing the storiea Through the Lens that magazines and news­papers are waiting for. You don't have to work weekends to meet Monday or Tuesday deadlines. You don't have to worry about being creative 50 or 60 hours a week. You don't have to concern your­self with self-promotion simply because it's the only way anybody ever knows who you are or what you can do. You don't have to concern yourself with all those things only if you don't care to eat or pay the mortgage. You see, there is no regular paychecks in this business, no fringe benefits, no sick pay, no per­sonal holidays and no retire­ment fund. "So why," you're probably asking yourself," would anyone ever want to get involved in that kind of situation, especially when there are a lot more cushiony jobs around that eliminate most of those apparent drawbacks?" advantnages. And those of us who ustruggle" independ­ently in this medium feel that our particular kind of free­dom is worth the price we have to pay. The reason I've taken the time to digress into this sub­ject from my usual discus­sion about cameras and their use is that many people are .looking to creative fields as a way to make a living. I don't recommend it if you're not thoroughly self-motivated. If you can't sit down and write or paint, or sculpt, or take pictures when it's raining or when you don't really feel like it, then better join a cor­poration where they provide a security umbrella that cov­ers "ofr days. Hank Kellner and I agreed on many points in the book we're preparing to do and the most important thing about photo marketing was not the end product, which we assumed would be done pro­fessionally, but the self­marketing and the self­motivAtion needed to keep trying when tne rejection notices come in. My friend, H.T. Kellner, has been a photojournalist for many years. He's been a regular contributor to such publications as Rangefinder, Darkroom Photography and Seventeen. As we deter­mined what the chapter headings might be as well as The other aWe of the fenc-not alwaya ,,..._,. but always photographable. Believe it or not, one of the main reasons is freedom­- not the kind of freedom to loaf, and do nothing, but creative freedom that pro­vides the opportunity to work as long as you like as hard as you like and develop the subjects you like. There just isn't any corporation in the world that provides those We can tell you when to market and how to market and where to market, but the actual udoing" has to come from inside. And let me tell you, ior me, doing it is worth the price. The French Quarter Cinema presen.ts plus "Dune Buddies" Both rated X, in color, all-male 527-0782 3201 Louisiana • Houston STILL ONLY 2.00 COVER KA\'E O'REAR OWSER/GES. MGR. POOL TABLE STILL 25¢ HARRIS LABOWITZ ASS'T. MGR. 1419 RICHMOND/ 528-8903 EVERY THURS., FRI. & SAT. WE SERVE ...., LIVE MUSIC LONE STAR "JUSTINE" 1 LONGNECKS WITH SHANNON McGUIRE, SUSAN CHESSHER&: SUSAN HYATI SPECIAL GUEST: KAT GRAHAM EVERY THURS., FREE BUFFET BY "HARRIS" THIS THVRS. CHICKEN Be DVMPLINGS "THE ONLY PLACE · - - --- ~ EVERY I wHERE EVERYONE IS EVERY WELCOME" THURS. SUN ALLBEER • KAYE, LIZ, HARRIS, 80¢ (EXCEPT I ALL SHA WNE, KARL &: I IMPORTS) SHANNON DRINKS TO SERVE YOU 75¢ J2S00' Til. 2A~t EXCEPT WI~E A~D IMPORTS POOL TABLES, BEER, WINE, TRAP SHOOT, ASTRO FIGHTER &: VEGA 21, DA~CING NO MIXED DRI~KS, BUT "BRING YOt:R OW~ BOTILE" WE SERVE SET-UPS Montrose Directory &> Want Ads Friday, Feb. JJ-Thursday, Feb.I9 PAGE 16 I MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 13, 1981 CONCERTS Note: Some aing:ina artiats"resentationt ~;~~~~~~~J~~~~·c.:.~~~~:r ;~r:. preaentationa are included eltewhere in thi1 ilaue under "Live Theater This Week Near Mont rote. .. Aaora Ballroom. 5134 Richmond-960· 1318 ~:ec~~n~u<;!.'~~e~n~on. evenina; 38 Jones Hall- 815 Louiaiana-227-2787 Componr Krzy aytof Penderecki con­ducts Houtton Symphony performins hit own workt featur1ng violimat ;&,c::yJ: ,~~:"t.:~·.-!::~:~0~ ss~~ elt ernoon. MUIIC lloiJ- 810 Boaby-975-8582. 222- -1 Christopher Cro~a Fri. evenina. Vaudeville Theeter-:Jl8 Milam- 227- «77 Local jazz ar lia:t1 Friday and S.turday __niahU aft• -boun. DATING SERVICES "A new way to meet friends." For lafonutloa Mad SASE 6 $llo Altenaatlva CoDDKiioaa Box 10 1713 Wntbel-r Houatoa, TX ""' CONFIDENTIAL Lembde Comp-121·5583 Let Lambdacomp strike a match for you. See our ad elsewhere in this issue. EROTICA *Adonit Newt-1407 Richmond-523- 0494 * Asylum Bookatore-1201 Richmond • Bell P1rk Bookttore- 1830 W. Alabama * Diner'• Newa- 240 Wettheimer-528- 8950 *Fnach Quart• Th .. ter-3201 Loui81aaa-527 .. 712 All-male double feature now showing at the French Quarter. See our ad elsewhere this issue. ~Je :~~i::.cluti.v~-1:.· !.~.~. . .l~ ng·t·h •.1.1- * Stuch Newa- 1132 W Al1beme Gay men excluaively. A $7 ad in the Montrose Voice may just bring you hundreds of dollars in business. A message for all shops, small stores and seroices in Montrose. You should be in the Montrose Voice's conununity directory! Your name, location, phone, operating hours, brands carried, services offered, etc., listed each week in the Voice's extensive Montrose Directory will bring in many new customers. Our directory has developed into a kind of "Yellow Pages" for Montrose. It's where thousands of people now look each week when they're in the market for special items or services. Our readers-an estimated 10,000 each week-strongly support our supporters. After all,· we're their community newspaper. Pick the plan that's best suited for you: (a) Business card-size listing: $14 a week for 4 times or $29 a week for 11 times. (b) A column-inch ad (1 column wide by 1 inch deep): $8 a week for 4 times or $7 a week for 11 times. (c) A simple listing of name, address, phone: free. Keeping Up by Willimn Hamilton Now, call the Voice. We can have you in for the next issue and you can have new customers almost immedi­ately. co •"' I love this room . Montrose Voice 1520 Montrose 529-8490. You should be listed! Gary Larson 01981 San Franc1scoChromcle Features Ohl Here he comes ... Now whatever you do, don't say anything about his ears. Tha-a-a-a-a-a-r she blows! .. \V// ~~--- -- 01981 San Franc•scoCh;omcle Features Okay, Bob! Go! Go! GAY BARS {A) Houston Tavern Guild member indl· Cltion, placed in this directory at their request. *Bebylon- 300 Westheimer-526-6551 Cak men predominantly; disco music ~~r ~~::c~~~~~~~~rr;~~~~~~: ¥~~.": Sat. evenings: T-dance a beer special Sun. even ins: closed Monday: beer spe­cial Wed. evenina: 20c well drinks Thurs. evening: cover charge niahtly. *Baja's-402 Lovett-527-9866 Ruth Hasting• and Co. Fri .. Sat., Tue1 .. Wed. A Thurs. evenings. *~Barn-710 Pacific-528-9427 Gay men predominantly: buffet Sun. afternoon: color night & pool tourna- ~~:~.: ~~~·.;;:~ii:~:, ;:J~~~~:k ~::t~ Thurs.; home of the Muttangs. * Black Boot-3Z7 Wntbel1Dar- 5ZI·7ZSI Double Schnapps just 75C at the Black Boot Cay men predominantly; luther night Tuet. *Brnot River Bottom-2400 Brazot- 528-9192 ~.•Jd~;~i~r~~.:"~nuan~~~~~te, c~~~~~:. evening•; 3rd anniversary par ty Sun.; beer butt Mon. evening; pool tourna­ment Thur• . evening; home Colt 45 Motorcycle Club. * Briar Patch-2294 W. Holcombe-885- 9678 ~rJ!~',:ouv~~=~~~~d~r:n~~~·~rJ~;i;~; Bowlers Special Mon. evening: pool tournament Wed. evening. • Bunkhoute-1704 Wut heimer-520- 1818 •Chicken Ranch- 535 Wettheimer- 522·8058 *Copa- 2631 Richmo~528·22S9 Cove-2912 S. Shepherd-524-01 70 *Diffeunt Orum-1732 Wutheimer- 528-8508 Cay men exclutively; drets code after 9pm; after-hours Fri. & Sat. evemnRt; beer specials Sat. I Sun. afternoons I ~~~e:;· :,:ebn~~=hlti~~d.~~~c~a~ ~~~~~:~e~ Leathermen. UOtrty Sally"s-220 Avondale-529· 7525 Beer 6 liquor busts Sal . & Sun. afternoons * E'f's-1213 Richmond- 527-9071 * AExi\e-1011 Bf'll-659·0453 Count ry band Fn & Sat. evemnfts; •mcusonat ion shows w1th .. l.ittle ::y.b~:~:~eexvaesn;r1~;e~~~or nlflhl Mon• •Galleon-2303 R•chmond-522-7616 Gay mPn .~red?mlnantly •Grant Strf'et Statton- 911 Fauv1tw 528·8342 *Houston Country-Z700 Alba· ny-528-7848 Find a man at Houston Country. See our ad elsewhere th1s issue. ~=~~~u~U~n T&h~r~u~~~e~~:~:: ~~~~ :~~j Sun. afternoon & Tues. eventn~ ; l.mda Petty Thurs. eventng •Just Manon & l.ynn's- 8 17 FturvJ~w - 528-9110 Gay women predommantly •Lampost-2417 T imes Blvd.-528· 8921 Cay women predomanantly. * I.Mary"o- 102Z Wnthelmor- SZI· 1151 Mary's, home of the Houston Motorcycle Club. See our ad elsewhere this i .. ue. Cll)' m~n predominantly: t•pf'd musu: by l.ury Fo~Ahl & aft~r- hours DIMhtly. hf'f"r husts Sun afl~rncH1n & Tuu f"\f'· nanM; hume Hnuston Moturc:p :lf' Club * AMidnJtf' Sun- S34 Wf''llhPimf"r-SZfl· 7S19 lmpersunatlon shows Sun A Wf'd f'\'f'nlnJtS • Muntrosf' MantnM Cu.-ROS Pttnfu:­S2c~~~~ A~en predominRntl)·: lw-Pt hust Sun. Rft ernuon: frH c:umplP.tr H nPrttl dJSf'IISf' tf'SIIDJC hv Huustun Hf"M ith Uf' pttrlmf'nl Sun ~tft ,.rnuun • Old Plf&niHIIUn- 2020 K1phnM 522· 231~;~w ni )Chll)· Y~.ll h Ru:k Ml'rf'Wf'lhl'r, Su,utl"r Kf'Hrllf'n A l.f'l" Pn¥1. "" un 1Uiund A hwhts. a!tf'r-huurs t'ra A Sal nuthls ilmMif'Ur lmpt'UUOHIU •n •hu¥1. Mun ,.,.,.n,nw. mHif' s trap umlf'~t hnals Tul'!l: f'H nlnN IOC dnnk1 Wf'd A l'hun ,., '""'"lot"· FEBRUARY 13, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 17 su~8~o~n T~ald C~!·~~·~at FEB FEB 13 14 FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB 15 16 17 18 19 *Our Placo- 1411 Ric:loJDOad-SZI· 003 Friendly, Friendly, Friendly. Our Place. See our ad eleewhere thia iuue. )uttine band Fri .. Set. a Thurs. eve· nina: buffet Thurs. evenine. * Pa rade-1416 Richmond- 520..1846 •Ranch-8820Y1 Main-528-8730 Country de nee le11ons Thurs. even ina. •Rocky"a-341& W. Dolloa- 528· 8922 Gay women exclutively. *Pink Elephant-1218 Leela nd-659· 0040 Cay men predomi nantly. * Sadd le Club-gn W. Drew- 528·9281 The Lonen country band Fri. a Sat. evenines: c•w dance le11on• Tues evemng * Twins-535 Wettheamer-5'!2·8058 Cay women predominantly *AVenture-N-2923 Main-522·9018 Cay men predominantly; Un-Porty Sun. evening; Bare Chest & Club N1,qht Wed Wildwood S.loon-1504 Westheamer- 528-9040 Beer bust Sun. eveninJII. GAY BATHS * Area•-2700 Albaay-520.1522 The Arena: A Man's Experience. See our ad elsewhere this i11ue. Cay men oclustvely, membersh1p requ1red~ hard-hat ntAht Sun. western ntaht Mon .. untform ntRht Tuts ~~:ay T-shut n•11ht Wed .. lnthUDl!i!htThurs. • Club Hnuaton-2205 fanmn- 659- 41198 c.ay men uc usiVely. mf'mbenhtp requtred. *Mtdtownl! Sp, 3100 Fennm~-szz . 2379 Cay men t)l.dustvf'ly. frer completf' Vf'neral dn~an tf'ltt b) HoustQn Huhh Dept Wed. f'\'tnma *2308 Club-2306 Geneooee-528- 8%35 Cav mf'n f'xclu11vely, membership req.utrrd HAIR CARE Mid Town Barbf.r Shnp- 602-A Ftllt· VlfW- 529·8018 • SRiondAnaf'l- 1544 WestheJmer-520- 9327 HOMES & APARTMENTS FOIIIIENT • FOil SALE Ruu Muntrosf' orhr.•- 528-5218 KEY SHOPS Rood"• Koy Shopo-1112 Woot­htiiDir • 11ZO Com-nwoaltb- 5Z3·ZIZ7 Reed's Key Shops in Montrose. LODGING •HouatoD Gunt HouH-181 Avon .. dalo-SZ0-•717 Houston Guest House: "Where the world meets Houston." See our ad elsewhere this issue. MASSAGE Legitimate Professional Massage [no sex calls. please) J.C., 529-7467 MOVING& HAULING SERVICES Moving, hauling, deliveries 520- 7744 IN • NEAl MONTilOSE BTIAIGHT NIGHTCLUBS WITH UVE ENTERTAINMENT Birdwatcher't-107 Wutheimer-527· 0595 Scott Gertner Quartet Fra .• Sat.. Tuet .. Wed 1: Thurs. enn•nas; Cra1~ Sm1th Quartet with Terry M11on Sun. a Mon evenms• Cody's-3400 Montrote-522-8747 Paul En11h1h Croup Fn 1: Set evenin11s plus Mon.-Thurs. evenin11• )asmina-1512 W. Alabame Cy Br~nson Fn. Sat & Thuu. •\.·PnlnR• La~.~~i;h~~:l14 fo-n~nl:am ilt & lht Robert Ceballos Croup ~ri Sal. A Tues.-Thurs eveniDJII. DrenPlvy Sun tVP.nln$1 Mum'!'l-2016 Mam-859-11)04 Bob Henschron \'l.·trokday arttrnoons. all womtn's tazz band Add l.lb" Jot Donna Mf'nthol Sun rovtruna NON·PROf1T MONTROSE ORGANIZATIONS ATTENTIO:'< ORGAI'tZATIONS Th• Vmcro '" as clnsf' at your phon,. C.RU us wtlh )'our nrjii'anautum·a nrws and mltf't· 1na datu 529~8490. noon-7pm A\·undalr Hou!IP-216 Avondalf'-S22· 7372 .. Muthror's Morn1na Out .. prna ram Tuu morDinRI Htr lnJI Memortal Methud11t Church- 1440 Hawthornr-526-1017 }~!h~~~~~ :!~'h!~~;/Fr~~;~~~:~~fln?t~~ Mtthud11t wunhtp u rvicf' Sun morn­ina: lnleRttty Houslun's Pnkl"t Acttvtty C roup m«linA Thun PVPnlnR Black A Wh1tf' Men TnJtf'lher-529-SOOfl. 774-3591 (Montrose) Church of Chnst - 520-K WestheJmer-774-23611 Church uf Chrtsll•n hlth - 413 Wttl· htlmf't-529-8005 sun .. :~~~~~P .~d'~~ ~~;m~~~rB:hf~ study Mon A Turs f'Yf'niDJlt; chcur pracllcP Wed evenana• C•llu:ns for Human t-:quahty- 60Q 1-'an­nm e1301-238-M66 Cnna Bf'th Chutm (;ay J,.wa C'n MC:CR. 1919 0f'c:alur-S2Q-4117ft. S24·51ft0 Nut l~rYICf' A ICH"IRI 1-'f'b. 13 OJJCnlly-SZR-7644 Mr.t>hnR Thun f'Vf'nma. r .. rholic Stu­drnl Cenlf'r 1-:dJtar's f 1rsl Church nf Sam-fU 5 W 0rf'w-S23-HIIft1. 447-IW9A Pnf'l ry rf'achnw• Wrd f'venma Epasc:np11l lnlf"Mrii)' - NfW)-073:1 s,.rvu:f'l Sun mnrnanw hm1l)' A 1-'rtf'nds uf Cays-c. u MC:CR. 1919 Of'calur MfftlnM "tun aflprnfHin F1rat lln1t.rum C:hurch- 5210 )-'•nntn­~ 26-1571 Lambda mH"IInw f-'n .. v,.n•nJl. PAGE 18 I MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 13, 1981 G1y Archives of Texu-c/o Intqrity/ Houtton. 3405 Mulberry-529-7014 C.y joggen A11oci1tion 523-8788 ~YG~rt4~ ~~:i~~-o/7~~~~~n Cay Partntt- 861-9149 Gay Politiul Caucus 4800 Main •2t7 521-1000 Next meeting Feb. 18; city-wide .. GPC Night" Feb. 21. G•y Youn1 AduJta-c/o Church of Chris­tian Faith, 413 Wettheimer- 871-1269 Houaton Human Riahtl League-523- 11969 Houston Ttvern Guild-c/o Bam, Dirty Sally'•· Exile. Mary'a, Midnite Sun or Venture-N ~~}f!h~J:r-~~o1 \~:rin~ ~u%h.0 ~~~ Mulberry-521H014 Community Coffeehouse gathering Fri. evenins; 11th anniverury party a board election• Feb. 19. •KPFT Radio-419 Lovett Blvd. 528-- 4000 Wilde 'n Stem gay radio thow Thun. even ina. Lambda-c/o tst Unitarian Church. 5210 Fannin MeelmJ Fri. evenmg. Metropolitan Community ChW"ch-1919 Dec.tur-881-9149 Protestant worship services Sun. mornina. Sun. evenlna a Wed. evenina: :r,~:!~"~~~::..:~~&>;:;;::• ~=-~r:i Mon. evening; Spaniah cia11 Thurs. evening. Montrose Civic Club/Neartown-c/o Bering Church. 1440 Hawthorne- 522- 1000 Next meeUna Feb. 24. Montrose Clinic-c/o City or Houston Health Department-1115 N. Mac­Creaor- 222-4297 Free venereal dinaH teats dailv week­days: Mother Ruth's "Montrose Clinic on Wheels" this week: The Bunkhoun, 171M Wntheimer, next Friday, Feb. 13, 9pm to lam for free blood tnt• Mary'1, 1022 Wntheimer, mldnipt-3am, Saturday, Feb. 14, with the mobile unit for free complete venereal cliaean tntlng All compliment• of the City of Houston Health Department. Montrose Counaehna Center-900 Lovett 0200-528-0037 Montrose Patrol 3329 Richmond 528- 2273 Montroae Sinaers-cJo MCCR. 1119 Oecatur-527-M89 MHhna Mon. evenins. Montrose Sports A11ociation Bowlina- 885-1734. 522-3329 League gamea Mon. evenln • • Stadium Bowl: 1st annual International Cay Bowlina Oraanh:atlon Tournament May 23·25, Stadium Bowl. Montrose Sport• Aaaoclalion Tennis- 529-2750 Meetings Thura. evening. Mohtroae Symphony Band-c/o MCCR, 1919 Decatur-527-9889 National A11ociation of Buainesa Coun­cilt- 1911 Southwest Fwy. a1oo-C Texas Bay Area Cays-332-3737 Meetina Thurs. evenlna. Texas Cay Taak Force-528-3636 Conference VIII Sept. 4-7. 4800 Texas Human Rishta Foundation-528- 9139 Unitarian/ Unlvertalitt Gay Caucus-c/o 1st Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin-524· 7524 Next meellng Feb 15 Weatheimer Colony Arts Auocialion- 908 Wettheimer-521-0133 ~~;~heimer Colony Arta Festival Apr. PERSONALS ADVERTISING RATE in thia aec:lion: 25C per word per i11ue, payable i::t :vual:~e.u~llt!~n1f:!r:rinc!;':.''BU~ ~X NUMreRS: additional S1 for each WHk the ad ia to run. Write out your ad on a plain piece of paper with name, address and signature. and MAIL TO Montrose Voice, 3520 Montrose, suite 227. Hous­ton, TX 77008. INTO JOCKS a thelrotropo?Send S10for 1 strap actually worn by Hot Houston Bartender. That Includes man hendlina (aalea tax alto included). Box 12d. 3317 Montrose, Houston. TX 77008. GWM. 30. VERSATILE. wants to meet new people. 18-30, for aood times. Send phone to Ad 111 c/o Montrose Voice WANT A FREE vacation in the Yucatan? ~n~i:.~r~~-t~!.~:~:r;~:~~r~~-.~~s! ':: ~T~;h~~oR~t.~~;;~ tfo~~~~~tf1c i1~~5~ BWMT. BLACK 6 WHITE Men Toaether, :nr~~~~~~::,~~l ~~~v:~~;!~~~~·c!:1: 774-3581. SINCERE CHEF with tuxedo. Allow me to prepare end aerve your next importent ••apper! Thorn, 523~6577. HOT MONTROSE MAN. 30, Ck octive, Fr pastlve, well built. equip~d. seeks ~:~!~~::\':;.- .:~!~0~.~~~7;~.3317 PRINTING Kwik~ Kopy PMntina-3317 Montrose- 522·1- PUBUCATIONS lnner~View-520 Weatheamer-522-9333 Wallflowers • MontroM Volce-3520 Moatrooe .227-528-Mto The "Montrose Voice," the newspaper of Montrose. TWT-3223 Smith •103-527~9111 RESTAURANTS • Bar-B-Que Ranch 1525 Westheimer 529-2289 * Brasserie Reateurent-515 W. Ala~ bama-528-8744 *Gbapuitapoc Modcaa Rntou­ra• t-13 Rlcluaoad-522-2315 Great Mexican Food in Montrose. *Gronl-1322 Wntbtlmor-522· 1521 Cronies is open after the bars close. See our ad elsewhere in this issue. Aft er-hours nightly: cha mpagne brunch Sun. afternoons. *Houae of Piea-3112 Klrby-528-3816 ~:~~~D na-::~a~~~:~~~·m ·~~ Mala-llt-1781 Great Mexican Food in the Heights. See our elsewhere this issue. • *Spud-U-Like-418 Weatheimer 520- 0554 •Stoamtable-708 W. Alabama The Steamtable: home-style breakfast, lunch, supper. See our ad elsewhere this issue. ROOMMATES ANGLETON roommate wanted, share 2 bdrm. Brazosport area. Male. 849-2161, call evenings. Roommate Connection Share expenees, build a friendship. We provide tbe reforrala wltb ref· orencn, pbotot and all approp· rlate information. Profntlonal Scroenlna. 526-8002. OTHER SHOPS, STORES & SERVICES • All That Glittero (gilto)-4325 Montrose-522-8978 *By man'o lntorloro (bomo furalohiaa•J-808 Woothe imer- 5211-8002 VVinter Clearance Sale in progress at Hyman's Fine FurnishinRS. See our ad elsewhere this issue. *Deb's Ts (T·thirt imprinting) 520 Weathelmer-520-1304 * Downbeat Recorda-2117 Richmond 523-8348 * Facets (aifts) 1412 Wtstheimer 523~ 1412 * J•z.zroom (record•) 808 Lovett 529- 0028 *A Place in Time (UNCI clothlaa)- 1t011 Rlcbmond Vintage Clothing. Quality Second­Hand Clothing. A Place in Time. See our ad elsewhere this issue. •Q-t Le1ther (clothing a erotica)-408 Wettheimer-527-9044 *Record Rack-3109 S. Shepherd-524· 3802 *Sports Locker (clothing)-311 West­heimer- 520-6555 *Trea Chic (eyewear)-520 West~ heimer-526-0878 *Treyman (gifts)-407 Westheimer- 523·0228 *Wilde 'n' Stein Book Shop-520 West­heimer- 529-7014 Exclusively gay. TAXI Ualtod C.b-75._1411 United Cab, in Montrose and throughout Hous ton, 24 hours. 759-1441. TRAVEL AGENCY Prestia• Trovel- 3205 Montrooo- 522·1922 P r estige Travel Agency in Montrose. See our ad elsewhere in this issue. TYPESmiNG & GRAPHICS *Montrooo Volco Typot ottlna- 3520 Montrooe, oulte 227- 529·84• Fast, accurate, computerized typesetting-and printing. Small and large jobs. Publications, catalogs, brochures, forms. VVe specialize in complicated, unusual projects. Let us give you a bid. MONTROSE VOICE CLASSIFIED AD Insertion Form Please PRINT Clearly! Mail To: Montrose Voice From: CLASSIFIED 3520 Montrose. Suite 227 Houston, TX 77006 Classification: Roommates [ ). Help Wanted [ ), Personals [ ), For Sale [ ). Other: Copy: Rate for classified advertising is 25 cents per word or $8 per column-inch. At lhe per-word rate, all type appears in regular small classified type. At $8 per column-inch. type appears as large as possible in order to fill purchased space. Call for more information or to inquire about long-term discounts (four issues or more]. MontroM Voice • 3520 MontroM #227 • Houston, TX 77006 • 529-8490 Montrose Movies Six films with gay themes on the way There are at least six movies or TV films in the works for 1981 which have a gay theme, reports the National Gay Task Force, according to Charlie Jackson of Lesbian and Gay Media Advocates of Houston. Those SIX are: • Makmg Love from 20th Century, about a man who leaves his wife for another man, starrmg Harry Hanlon, Kate Jackson and Michael Onkean, • Partners from Para­mount, about two cops shar­ing a beat, one gay and one straight, • S1dney Shore, a TV movie from Warner Bros., starrmg Tony Randall as an older gay man livmg alone in New York City, • Boys Next Door, a TV pilot and a possible new ABC senes, • Harvey M1lk Story, a true story, from Lorimer about the slain gay San Fran­cisco city supervisor, and • KJ!hng of Georg1e from Cannon Films, by producer John Surdoval based on a song by Rod Stewart. "Gay Power" at film festival The controversial CBS report on gay pohllcal mfluence m San Francisco, htled Gay Power, Gay Poht1cs, report­edly was entered as a docu­mentary m the Monte Car lo Film Fesllval scheduled f01 opemng Saturday, Feb. 14. Movies Near Montrose This Week [Fr1day, Feb. 13, through Thursday, Feb. 19) Theater management, espe­Cially the Shamrock. changes films frequently. Readers are adv1sed to call theater to con­firm showmgs and obtam limes for films hsted here. Alabama-2922 S. Shepherd- 522-5176 Commumty Coffeehouse-Ber­mg Church. 3405 Mulberry- 529-7014 French Quarter-3201 LouJsJ­ana- 527-0782 Galleria-Loop 610 at West­heimer- 626-4011, 626-0140 Greenway-Greenway Plaza Underground-626-3339 Loew's Saks-S. Post Oak at San Felipe-627-9910 Museum of Fine Arts-Brown Auditorium, 1001 Blssonnet- 526-1361 Rice Media Center-Umverstty Blvd. at Stockton, entrance 7, Rice Univemty-527-4853 Rtver Oaks-2009 W. Gray- 524-2175 Shamrock-7017 S. Mam-797- 1446 Wmdsor-5078 Rtchmond- 622-2650 • Indicates movte ts recom­mended by the MONTROSE VOICE. Cont1nu1n1, Showlns Dally Altered Stoles [1980, rated R) starring William Hurt and Blatr Brown: Galleria Blood Beach [horror, rated R): Shamrock • La Cage oux Folies [comedy, m French with English sublttles, rated R) starrmg Ugo Tognazzt & Mtchel Serrault: Greenway Fred Scheptsfs The Chant of Jtmmle Blocksmtth [1980, Aus­tralian): Greenway Fear No Evil [1960 horror fan­tasy, rated R): Shamrock Fort Apache, The Bronx (1981, rated R) starrmg Paul Newman and Ed Asner: Loew's Saks and Shamrock The lncred1ble Shrtnk1ng Woman (1981 comedy, rated PC) starring Ltly Tomhn: Alabama The Jazz Su)ger (1980 musical, rated PG) starrmg Net! Dta­mond, Lucy Arnez and Laurence Ohvier: Gallerta Ak1ra Kurosawa's Kogemusha [rated PG): Greenway Agatha Chrtstte's MJTror Crack'd [1980 mystery, rated PC) starrtng Elizabeth and Ktm Novak: Wmdsor • Nme to F1ve [1980 comedy, rated PG) starrtng Dolly Parton. Ltly Tomhn & jane Fonda: Loew's Saks • Martm Scorsese's Rag1ng Bull [1980 drama, rated R) starrmg Robert De Ntro: Shamrock & Wtndsor Net! S1mon's Seems L1ke Old TJmes (1980 comedy, rated PC) starrmg Chevy Chase & Gold1e Hawn: Galleria •S•dney Pother's Sllr Crazy [1980 comedy. rated R) starrtng Gene Wtlder & Rtchard Pryor: Shamrock Tnbute [1981, rated PG) star­rmg jack Lemmon, Robby Ben· son & Lee Rem1ck: Galiena Wmdwalkcr [adventure. rated PC) starnng Trevor Howard: Shamrock Frtday only Stanley Kubnck's 2001 A Space Odyssey [sctence f1c· t10n): 9:00. Commun1ty Coffeehouse R1ttcr V1ctory: 8:00. Museum of Fme Arts Robert Bresson's Lancdor du Loc from France: 7:30. 10:00. R•ce Med1a Center Motel Hell [1980 horror) star­Ting Rory Calhoun: 9:30, R1ver Oaks Phontosm {1!179 hurrur)· 7·30, R1ver Oaks Saturday only Love and Death (1975 comedy) starrtng Woody Allen and Diane Keaton: 3:45, 7:15, River Oaks Antomoni's The Passenger star­rmg jack Ntcholson: 7:30, 10:00, Rtce Media Center Stardust Memones [1980 comedy) starring Woody Allen: 5:30, 9:00, River Oaks Sunday only John Huston's Asphalt Jungle: 7:30, Rtce Media Center The Kmg and I [1956) stamng Yul Brenner and Deborah Kerr: 1:45, 4:15, 7:00, 9:45, Rtver Oaks Monday only The Buddy Holly Story [1978 mustcal) starring Gary Busey: 7:15, Rtver Oaks Marlin Scorsese's The Last Waltz {1978): 9:30, River Oaks Tuesday only Ma1tresse starrmg Bulle Og1er: 7:15, Rtver Oaks The Story of 0 [straight erot­tca): 9:30, River Oaks Wednesday only Rude Boy starring The Clash [punk rock mustcal)/Devo [punk rock mus1cal shorts)!The Pretenders (punk rock mus1cal shorts): 7:15, 9:45, R1ver Oaks Thursday only Robert Bresson's Au Hazard Balthasar from France: 7:30. Rtce Med1a Center East of Eden {1954) starrmg James Dean: 7:30, Rtver Oaks Rebel Wllhout a Cause {1955) starrmg James Dean, Natahe Wood and Sal Mmeo: 9:45. R1ver Oaks Lalor to tour gay bars The following is a letter from City Councilman Lance Lalor, representing Mon­trose, to Houston gay club owners, reproduced in the Voice at Lalor's request. On Saturday night, Feb. 21, Houston's Gay Political Caucus will (be) celebrating their Sixth Anniversary. They have set a goal of raising $6000 to retire GPC's debts. As a club owner and/or manager, you can help the Caucus reach and exceed it's goal. Along with other public officials, I will be taking an active part in helping GPC on this fundraiser, and will visit as many of the participattng clubs as possible on "GPC Nile." All that you do will be greatly appreciated. Through your cooperation. the GPC will remain a strong voice protecting the rights of all citizens. [signed) Lance Lalor, Houston City Council member ·::.·:· ·· ··· .. Samantha Reads Your Stars H you ware born thl• wMk: You are open and friendly to everyone. You make decisions rapidly and have even been known to act before you think, on more than one occasion. ARIES (:t-2114-11): Full steam ahead, Aries! This week you can give your lull a«ention to those matters uppermost in your mind. Partnerships are highlighted and a cooperative spirit wins the days. TAURUS (4-20/5-20): You are not lamous for your flexibility, Taurus dear. This week you're apt to meet several equally stubborn types, and, If some­one Isn't wilting to try a compromise, sparks will fly. Days shimmy to juicy finale. GEMINI (5-21/1-20): Emotions could be running high this week. Gem, as you and those around you take yourselves and your work perhaps a tltlle too -iously. Cupid pops in throughout, shooting butlseyes all over the place. How about !hall MOONCHILD (8·2117-H): Wind up a certain commitment so you'll be ready for a new project. Home and family affairs are accented. Trust may play a key role in much of your week, Moonbaby. Days plop to puzzling conclusion. LEO (7-2311-22): Get back to basics, Leo, with close-to­home activities. Make calls and tend to correspondence. Exa­mine a certain room in your house With a critir.ai eye: this could be the time for a •­changes VIRGO (1-23/1-22): Other peo­ple may try to Involve you in their squabbles. Avoid taking ald..,, Virgo, and stash your peacemaking ideas. Let the turkeys patch up their own differences. Days bustle to busy close with company on the way. LIBRA (1·23/10-23): Make decisions concerning personal development this week, Libby, and stick to 'em. Go over your budget with a line-tooth comb and make necessary changes. Latter days - you on the move and receiving good news. SCORPIO (10·24111·22): You're in the midst of change, Scorp. And, though you always play for keeps, you may not be sure exactly what game you're playing right now. Don't panic, babe, confusion should c1aar a bit before last day. Goody! SAGITTARIUS (11·23112-21): Watch out for the ol' grMn­eyed monster this week, Saj. Jealousy definitely does not become you, angel! Stay out of corners and don't listen to secrets. Later, you have both a choiCe to make and a day to celebrate. CAPRICORN (12·2211·11): Ba aggressive, Cappy. You know what you want, now go alter it. Get together with friends and do schedule time for se-at meetings. Don't waste time by waiting around for one who doesn't know what he's doing. AQUARIUS (1·20/2-11): Ba prepared to explain your posi­tion, Aquarl, but don't let any­one put you on the defensive about it. Oust off an old plan and give It a second lool<. Later. put on your glad raga and be ready to meet someone "- PISCES (2-2013·20): Start working toward your goals. You can dream about them all day, Pisces, but dreaming isn't doing. A brash newcomer may blow In like a tornado, but you'll find he's raally just a refreshing braaze. Super Psychic - My ESP says that DOW is a good time to bay a new car, if you need one. As I predicted earlier, third quar­ter auto sales are ap, bat get ready for more auto price iDcreases ill 1981. - In the early '80s, the new car unve11ings each fall will rival the excitement of the ·~os when vast model changes caused showrooms to be crowded. My ESP feels that the auto industry will once again enjoy a stromt BY DAVID HOY influence on Amencan life; fall will be turned into an exciting penod for car enthusia~ts . - Gasoline prices will continue to rise and an enacted congressional Jaw will cause proliferating pump prices. Tbat's PPP according to ESP! - I predtct that unem­ployment ftgures will be LOWER by spring of 1981 This news will include facts about more women in the JOb market than ever before. - I feel tbat borne build· ing will increase in tbe spriDg of 1981, due to a brief loweriDg of interest rates. In spite of tbe gloomy forecasts by most economists, major building categories will rise in early spriDg. EVALUATE THE EVIDENCE. By keepmg accurate records on your telepathic feelings, you will soon be able to check up on your accuracy. There 1s a great difference between GUESSING a thmg to be so, IMAGINING something to be so, and FEELING that your impressions are accu­rate - then finding out that you WERE CORRECT It is an exhilarating experience and will spur you on to try other, more difficult goals. Here are some additional tests or goals to get in prac­ticing your telepathy - Send thoughts to others of "I love you " pets Reach out to frtends Communicate w1th Prepare for news of happiness or tragedy. - Know whtch way to go to ftnd a park1ng space, etc. Want to develop your Telepbatby? For free, belp­ful bints, send a long, self· addressed, stamped enve­lope to SUPER PSYCHIC by David Hoy, c/ o tills newspa­per. Tbe words SUPER PSYCHIC must appear on your outer envelope. Tbe volume of mail probibits personal replies.
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