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Montrose Voice, No. 410, September 2, 1988
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Montrose Voice, No. 410, September 2, 1988 - File 001. 1988-09-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 16, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/8166/show/8130.

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(1988-09-02). Montrose Voice, No. 410, September 2, 1988 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/8166/show/8130

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 410, September 2, 1988 - File 001, 1988-09-02, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 16, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/8166/show/8130.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 410, September 2, 1988
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 2, 1988
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript ontroseVoice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE 0 CIIommunitu Jubli!il~ing CIIompnnu 0 FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1.988 0 ISSUE 410 HOUSTON WEEKEND WEATHER: Fair but with 30% chance afternoon thunderstorms. Day highs 92, night lows 73. Gay Cruisin', 1930's Life In the Big City Way Back When 0 THE HEAL TH CRISIS Officials Discuss 'Problents' A Cure Will Cause 0 THE MONTROSE NEIGHBORHOOD A Not So Antique Dealer on Wooodhead s Pe Wat • s Rebel With A Cause ~- FOR THE MOST HOUSTON BAR ADS, SEE UJC[iJ E3CC[iJ IN THE BACK OF THE VOICE 2 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 2, 1988 BENEFIT CONCERT REG BRAND WITH REBECCA TELEP SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1988 3:00 p.m. or 8:00 p.m. - 3620 WASHINGTON TICKETRON: 526-1709 DEBI DOYLE: 522-7839 AN OPPORTUNITY TO CONTRIBUTE TO AIDS PATIENT CARE IN HOUSTON $20.00 RESERVED SEAT $100.00 RESERVED TABLE CASH BAR BENEFICIARIES: AIDS INTERFAITH COUNCIL THE OMEGA HOUSE I I • Fortunes By Mark Orlon Your Horoscope from The Montrose Voice For Friday avan1ng, Saptambar 2, through Friday aftarnoon, Soptombar 9, 1988: ARIES-Last time's obsession is tem­pered. You have so many friends around that t he re's simply not time to indu lge your private intrigues. All these welcome people surrounding you gives your life a happy feeling. Celebrate! TAURUS- All of that incredible sexual energy that started out has become inspi­rational. Your desires may not be les­sened, but your mind is working overtime on c reative projects. You've been block­ing them up 'til now! Create your own life! GEMINI- Brothers and sisters can best help you work out the problems you're faced with. You're reaching out for acceptance; if you didn't want it so much, th ings might be a lot easier, but certainly a lot less interesting. Be able to reach in for acceptance. ~~~~~~~~~ CANCER-If you hadn't planned on seeing your oldest out-of-town friend in the coming months, you should; other­wise, you'll miss out on what union and reunion can really feel like and mean. There's some tension, even frenzy in a sexual relationship you're having. A break from that couldn't hurt, could it? LEO- You will be acutely aware of how you are seen and known by others. From that awareness follows the realization of the positive and negative limits that define your life. You will want to com­municate your deepest self to one you love deeply. It can only lead to good. VIRGO- This yearning for adventure is now taking shape, and if you're not in flight or at least on your way somewhere while you read this, I' ll be surprised. Whether the journey is long or short, an outward or an inner one, you're well on your way. Bon voyage! LIBRA- Deeper questions of existence occupy your mind. You feel c leansed with the fire of passion, and your mind is clear now. You observe, as if an outsider, the wonderful world you live in. With your new-found love, you'll discover more and have more questions. SCORPIO-Someone is looking to you as the authority, as the one with the knowledge. You're a father figure now, regardless of your sex. Don't play any strange numbers on this person. Be who you are and assume the role gracefully! Daddy's home! SAGITTARIUS- What belongs to you and what belongs to another may come into question. Do not get involved in any kind of legal entanglement. Let your quarrel remain a personal matter, and treat the situation fairly. Selfishness ain't gonna get you nowhere with this one. CAPRICORN- The spirit of entertain­ment continues, and now you're willing to allow others on the stage with you. Be the party giver and come up with something completely different. Be bizarre, if you must. You can carry it off right now. AQUARIUS- You're concerned with the finer and deeper points of relation­ships. Self-centeredness is out the win­dow, and you're embarking on a journey that will bring you back as a more com­plete individual. With the right partner, you'll discover a brave, new world. PISCES- Changing careers in mid­stream could be what you're thinking of. And it could work. You'll probably be get­ting some kind of offer that will seem hard to turn down. Think long and hard on this one; retreat from the hustle and bustle and consider the facts. .... tAe Mo'Ntlibse vo1C£ SEPTEMBER 2, 1988 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 RESCUE JESIJ5! "HE 15 NOT HERE-HE 15RISEN!" Report: Censorship Groups Are Shifting Tactics By Tamara Henry FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE WASHINGTON (UPI)-Leaders of the book-banning movement, unable to win ideological battles in court, have begun to work from within the public school system to influence what children are taught, according to a report released Wednesday. People for the American Way said "would-be book banners"-many of them fundamentalist Christians-have shifted complaints about literature taught in schools away from traditional far-right scare words, such as "secular humanism" or "globalism," to new vague categories, such as "offensive language" and "the occult." Instead of trying to remove books al­ready placed in classrooms or libraries, the report said opponents now are in­volved in the policy process. "They have taken an especially active role in school boards and textbook selection," the re­port said. People for the American Way, a 250,000-member civil liberties organiza­tion, said the report, titled "Attacks on the Freedom to Learn," is the sixth an­nual nationwide study on censorship and other ideological attacks on public education. It was based on news reports from around the country and on inde­pendent research by the organization's staff. The group said the shift in tactics is due to two decisive court rulings stating public schools are not to be the agents of any particular religion or sect. "Organized national groups are less obviously involved in local challenges this year," the group said. "In light of their defeats in the courtroom during the past year, they have refocused their ef­forts. They have opted to pursue their agenda through conventional channels of participation- mainstreaming their tactics, but not their goals. "Their goals-forbidding discussion of any views outside their own narrow sectarian perspective-remains un­changed." The report singled out the national groups Concerned Women for America, headed by Beverly LaHaye; Eagle Fo­rum, headed by Phyllis Schlafly; Na­tional Association of Christian Educators/ Citizens for Excellence in Education; Educational Research Ana­lysts, headed by Mel and Norma Gabler; and, National Legal Foundation, head­ed by Pat Robertson. According to the report, "Censorship attempts remain a persistent problem nationwide and a serious threat to the integrity of our public schools." Censorship attempts occurred in 42 states and in every region of the country during the 1987-88 academic year, said the report. The South had 50 censorship cases; the Midwest had 46; the West, 42; and the Northeast, 19, the group said. Welcome To The Big Time Folk singer Tracy Chapman, starring with Bruce Springsteen and Sting on the upcoming Amnesty International tour, is being touted as the top new artist of the year and her self-titled album is No. 3 on the billboard chart, but she's not totally comfortable with fame. "If somehow I could just walk around invisible when I'm not on stage .. .," Chapman says in Rolling Stone. Chapman is unsure what to think of the fortune that is coming with her new fame. "I've got to figure O)Jt some way not to give it all to the government because they deserve it least of anyone," she says. "But I'm going to be very careful about all this financial stuff and there aren't many things right now that I want or need." In more than one-third of the inci­dents, books or programs were removed or restricted. The book, "Of Mice and Men" by John Steinbeck was the most frequently attacked this past year, and the young adult novels of Judy Blume and Robert Cormier continued to draw attacks, the report said. The report said the teaching of crea­tionism as science remains a major source of controversy and national relig­ious rights groups are focusing efforts on censoring sex education. To fight censorship attempts, People for the American Way recommended lo­cal communities form review commit­tees that are broadly representative and that focus on assessing the educational merit of challenged material. School dis­tricts should publicize the criteria and procedures for selecting textbooks and other instructional materials and allow parental involvement, officials said. Battle Royalty Brenda Lee just started a big legal battle with MCA Records, suing for $20 mil­lion and claiming she is owed royalties for a 20-year contract she signed in 1962 when she was 17. The suit cites the New York account­ing firm of Prager & Fenton as taking MCA to task for failing to cooperate with attempts to audit the label for Lee. The accountants' report does say there is a documented difference of more than $236,000 in Lee's favor between MCA's figures and theirs. In another singing suit, former Su­preme Mary Wilson is being sued by Ahrgus Juilliard, who wrote the book "DreamGirl: My Life as a Supreme" about Wilson. Juilliard wants $300,000, objecting to certain expenses Wilson listed in an ac­counting of the costs of producing the book, including Juilliard's $650-a-week salary and Wilson's wardrobe expenses. 4 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 2, 1988 Montrose Soap Buzz-Are you modeling off a new shirt or just rehearsing for your next number? Lulu (Q.T.'s): When are you going to let the baby out to play? What's going on? Floyd G. and Jack H. coming into the bar together at 7:00 a.m. We hear that Shimmer's clothes really fit him now since he stayed in the water all day Sunday at Mary's. Who was sponsoring the free balls to throw? How about a cocktail while doing your laundry? You can nave one at The Off Beat. Get ready for Bacchus' Pirate Party­Coming Soon. Has "Juicy-Lucy" been up all night chasing Vodoos again? The one and onlv Miss A. No one does it better. PHOTO BY AON MATHIS Certainly. Anytime. PHOTO SY AON MATHIS Miss Montrose, Pickles Polanski, (right) at last weekend 's Trouble Fund fundraiser at Mary's. Community News from Neighborhood & Community Gr oups .. Mayor Whitmire To Proclaim "Houston Art Against AIDS Month" Houston Mayor Whitmire will officially proclaim September as " Houston Art Against Al DS Month" on Tuesday, September 6, 11 :30 a.m. during a luncheon at The Men ii Collection. The "Houston Art Against AIDS Month" kick- off event will be hosted jointly by the Cultural Arts Council of Houston (GACH). Business Volunteers for the Arts (BVA). and the "Houston Art Against AIDS" Committee. Adan A. Rios, M.D., AIDS Expert Joining Mayor Whitmire as keynote speaker for the program will be noted AIDS expert Adan Rios. M.D. and Houston Ballet Executive Direc­tor Gary Dunning. The speakers will discuss the medical. social and political issues associated with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). According to BVA's Executive Director Martin Cominsky. representatives from AIDS primary care provider organizations will be at each table to answer questions about AIDS patient care and services in Houston, Bering Adult Day Care Center, Bering Dental Clinic and AIDS Interfaith Alliance. Tenneco Oil Company is a partial un­derwriter of the luncheon. All "Houston Art Against AIDS" monies will be channeled through the AIDS Care Fund, a program established in May, 1988, by the Houston/Harris County AIDS Panel with the initial seed money and staffing provided by the United Way. The AIDS Care Fund coordi­nates fund raising and the distribution of funds in an effort to increase needed resources to care providers. The AIDS Qare Fund also assists care providers in applying for grant monies that are available from many sources. "Houston Art Against Al DS" will be the first to distribute its proceeds through the AIDS Care Fund The "Houston Art Against AIDS" Committee is comprised of Frank Carrell, Jeff Cowie, Ben C. Crump, Barbara Davis. Susanne Demchak, Paula Fridkin, Bill Graham, Rachel Hecker, Sharon Kopriva, Bob McClain, Sandy Parkerson, Michael Peranteau, Robert Rosenberg, Sally Sprout, Betti Maldonado and Nancy Dukler. The committee will publish a Calendar of Events to be available September 1. To obtain a calendar or further information, please call 524-7883. For luncheon reservation call BVA. 658-2483. The Montrose Voice HOUSTON, TEXAS ISSUE 410 FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1988 Published weekly FLAGSHIP OF THE <l:ommunitu l3ublisqing <l:omp1mu 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright 1988 Office hours: gam-6pm Henry McClurg 1publ1sher·ed1tor Donald Upchurch 'office manager Billie Duncan, Jeff Bray, Sharon Taylor.nows Bill O'Rourke1arts & entertainment editor David Szynaf!production SUBSCRIPTIONS (713) 529-8490 ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT (713) 529-8490 David Chapman/account executive Mark Earytaccount executive POSTMASTER Send address corrections to 408 Avon­dale. Houston. TX 77006-3028 Subscription rate in US (by VOJce cam6r or US Mail) $1 25 per week ($32 50 per 6 months or $65 per year) National advtrt1sm9 representative R1vendell Marketing. PO Box 1268. Pla1nheld. NJ 07061. (201) 754-4348 Final advertising dead/me Spm Wednesday for Friday pubhcat1on Notice to advertisers Advertising rate schedule Eight-A was effectiveApnl. 11, 1986 Responsibility We do not assume financial responsibility for claims by advenisers but readers are asked to advise lhe newspaper of any suspicton of fradutent or deceptive advert1S1ng and s;.isp1c1ons will be mvesttgated News service Umted Press lntemahonal The Montrose Voice It's The Place to Advertise J!n llJ!fomorium ( 10/5/50-8/26/88) A memorial service was held August 30, 1988 at Bering Methodist Church to bid farewell to a beloved friend. Roger was a hair dresser in Houston for ten years. He was also a platform artist and a Designer for plays. A winner of numerous trophies and awards for his work with beauty pageants and contests. Roger was a generous man who always had a kind word and a helping hand for anyone in need. He was a loving man and a constant guide and inspiration for his family and many friends and will never be replaced in our hearts. He is survived by his mother and step-father, Ruth and Verne Wiggins of Tulsa, Oklahoma, his dear sister, Linda Rozell of Corville. Arizona, four step- brothers, David, Perry, and Nathan of Tulsa, Oklahoma and Les of Rosenberg, Texas, Deborah Payne of Surfside, Texas. and Martha Bare of San Antonio, Texas. And many nieces and nephews. Despite his lingering illness Roger never lost his sense of humor, his love for life, his dignity, or his faith in God Heaven is a brighter place because of our loss Staff, management and patrons of Chutes will miss you, Roger The Montrose Vo.ce 1s honored to commemorate the lives of our readers. and f11end1 or relatives of our readers. with an announcemenl Ob11uary informi1ion shoukl be furnished by a relative. friend or funeral home m person (not by mail or phone) There 11 no tee SEPTEMBER 2, 1988 / MONTROSE VOICE 5 ============================================== Ault reflected on the past-in 1985, $70 000 B 1 I A S • whensome peoplebegantalkingabouta ' a ance S Urpnse march. He says, "There was a growing need to release anger. We could sense W • df 11 F G G there was a sort of community coming In a Or ay roups to~e~~:ga;::~a::~~khundredsof thousands began to arrive, and it took me half an hour just to get through the people to my D.C. office. The TV camer­as filled the hallways and the print me­dia was always on the phone. There was close to one hundred related events go­ing on that week, and we had to tell everyone where they were. Amidst all this, there were no arrests-accept where we wanted them, at the Supreme Court." By George Mendenhall FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE When the final Lesbian and Gay March on Washington (Oct. 1987) expenses were paid last month the bank account had a sizable balance from the $400,000 that had been raised-over $70,000. Em­barrassed over the riches, march execu­tives met in San Francisco last week and mulled over 280 request for funds. With an emphasis on dispersing funds where it would best further the lesbian and gay movement, they grant­ed $66,500 to 34 groups. Those who will benefit are 14 gay and lesbian organiza­tions (27,500), eight conferences (15,000), five AIDS causes ($9,000) and six special projects ($10,000) a minimum of 25 percent of the grant went to people of color. No funds will be retained to plan an­other march. "We do not have to have marches like regular rituals," co-chair Steve Ault explained. "The march was a means to an end. It was an extraordi­nary successful event, but it was only a tool to activate new people into the movement and to get action on AIDS. We never planned to continue. It was an ad hoc operation with no responsibili­ties or power attached. Once we distrib­ute the money, we will disband." The march co-chairs are Pat Norman of San Francisco, Kay Ostberg of Wash­ington, D.C., Nicole Ramirez Murray of San Diego, and Ault of New York City. Ault explained that in making the grant selections an attempt was made to assist groups in a broad geographical area that might not otherwise be fund­ed. A minimum of25 percent of the total grant money went to people of color. The activist said an attempt was "to find a real diversity. We did not want to con­centrate on the West and East Coast and we tried to evaluate those getting the funds to determine if the money would be properly spent." Diversity was evident in the selec­tions: Hen trick-Martin Institute ($3,500) will develop a comic book, "Tales from the Closet," directed at teenagers who are coming out. The National Associa­tion of People with AIDS received $2,000 to begin monitoring people with AIDS in the workplace. Lesbian and Gay Rights of Texas ($2,500) will organize a gay rights march in Austin. NOW of New Jersey ($1,000) will continue to get a state gay rights bill passed. Womyn's Braille Press ($2,500) is translating les­bian and gay literature into braille. TV Skirmish Scuttled Syndicated television talk-show host Morton Downey won't be arrested for scuffling with a weekly newspaper edi­tor during a stage show in New Haven, Conn. State prosecutor Burton A. Kaplan said he rejected a warrant charging Downey with breach of peace because he wanted to devote his resources to more serious crimes. Downey scuffled with Paul Bass, edi­tor of the New Haven Independent, dur­ing a stage show Aug. 14. At one point during the show, Bass's sister walked on stage and slapped Dow­ney in the face. March organizers gave $2,500 "seed" money for a National Lesbian and Rights Congress, an idea they had long supported. Two hundred attended its or­ganizing meeting during the 1987 march. Representatives are to be chosen from across the country to attend the Congress, set tentatively for the Fall of 1989. A national communications network is being set up. It will utilize the march mailing list of over 11,000 organizations and leaders. The Lesbian/Gay Rights AIDS Action Emergency Response Net­work had been formed with a $2,500 march grant. Using mailing lists and computers, it will allow for a quick na­tional response in a lesbian or gay crisis. There was some disappointment. "There were so many worthwhile en-deavors," Ault said. "We just did not ' have enough money to go around." He adds that after a final march and a re­solving of a few business matters any remaining money will be granted tooth-ers. Criticism that the march organizers should set aside several thousand dol­lars for another march is rejected by Ault. "We wanted a sense of closure," Ault urges, "by giving the balance back to the community. If the money re­mained we would have to set up a whole new organization to deal with that. The march started with no money. If there is again a mandate-and that is a big if­then the money will be there. Tip as to whether there is enthusiasm for another march will be whether new money can be raised." Ault concludes, "A lot of us who were involved for two years with the march are still trying to calm down. There was so much tension and mental exhaus­tion." He believes the next major event may be the 25th anniversary of the Stonewall riots in 1994. With mixed emotions, he added, "We should start thinking about that. It will take a lot of planning." Art: Rodney Greenblat's A Colorful Blast Rodney Alan Greenblat's "Treasure Ox," courtesy of the Gracie Mansion Gallery By Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice A&E Editor The world created by the works of Rod­ney Alan Greenblat might remind you of Pee Wee Herman. Both have taken influences from the daily world and combined them with influences from art which forms a fantasy world and left the viewer with the feeling that the artist is caught somewhere between the two. Or, more likely, is somehow able to travel between all three places but likes the border area best. The title of the Greenblat exhibition currently at CAM, "Reality and Imagi­nation: Two Taste Treats in ONE!" is taken from a slogan painted on one of the works. Its flavor of Certs commer­cials captures the true middle-class Americana of his "reality" influences: T.V. (including Star Trek and Mr. Rod-gers' Neighborhood), motels, jewelry boxes, curio cabinets, miniature golf (His one hole gold course carries the mottoes, "Realize your full potential­play miniature gold," and "Putt-putt players always get it in the hole."), sub­urbia. The fantastic side of his art sends roots deep into, among other places, Fantastic Planet (a huge statue does double duty as a motel), Peter Max, Mad Magazine and the kind of plaster art dentists used to give good young pa­tients to take home and paint. All of his works are semi-practical. The huge "Treasure Ox" straddles a steam and a highway like a freshly minted ancient colossus. Inside its back is a small space for storing what-have­you. There's an installation of an entire room from his universe. Another work features clearly marked hidden draw­ers. This is one show where it's difficult for even the adults to keep from using the art physically. "Allyouwant Mall" includes stores named "Toys or Else" and "Cookie Mon­soon." Another work has a sign reading "Kids Welcome." They certainly are. There's even a small corral for them to go into and make their own art. But I don't see how they could hope to catch all of the allusions. If you know the difference between "childlike" and "childish," you'll love this young (only 27) man's art. NOUVEAU: Visual Arts Alli­ance (O'Kane Gallery, 29-September 16th)-mixed media. Make My Day Who can forget Doris Day in '50s steam­ers like "Teacher's Pet" co-starring Clark Gable, but not much is heard these days about the perpetually blond, perky Girl Next Door. That's because she is out of the lime­light heading The Doris Day Animal League, a 250,000-member strong ani­mal rights lobbying group based in Washington. Day, an animal lover with lots of dogs and cats, is also involved in another non-Hollywood project. She recently become part owner of the historic Cypress Inn in Carmel, Calif. One of her first executive moves was to change the Inn's policy of "No Ani­mals Allowed." Although she's currently out of the film industry, this thrice-married, now single veteran of show business would consider a return. "When and if the right script comes along," says Day. Her son Terry Melcher is carrying the entertainment torch for the family. Melcher wrote and produced the song "Kokomo" recorded by The Beach Boys and featured in thenewTomCruisefilm "Cocktail." 6 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 2, 1988 SHEAR MADNESS IS COMING TO TOWN::: SHEAR MAD~. the comedy Whodunit currently the longest running play In the history of Boston and Philadelphia Is schedullng Prlndpal Audlttons for a Houston Productton to open In November. Audlttons will be held on September 12 and t 3 from t 0:00 AM to 1 :00 PM and from 2:00PM to 6:00 PM at Theatre Under The Star.;, 4205 San Felipe. Prepare a 2 Minute contemporary monologue. NIIDED: aever, brlght, aeattve, "per.;onallty" type actor.; at home with lmprov and lots of audience part1dpat1on. This Is NQI a musical. NICK ROSETTI-Undercover cop responsible for sofv1ng the "Shear Madness" murder. A real gumshoe. Likeable, vulnerable yet with a take-charge per.;onallty. Must be able to tum on the charm. Quick with an audience. (30-45). TONY WHITCOMB-Madcap proprletor of "Shear Madness· salon. High energy. Very likeable, lots of comedy both physically and vocally. His feet never touch the floor. (25-40). BARBAJtA DEMARCO-a streetwise, gum­chewing manlcurlst cum hairdresser. Co­medienne who has a nice dramattc tum. Cross between Madge the Manlcurlst and Medea. (30-45). MDCE THOMAS-Rosettt's partner. Hair washed and drled each night. Quick thinker. Tough when necessary. EDDIE LAWRINCir-Ex-con turned antlque dealer. VIiiain of the piece. Lots of d eadpan comedy. Good looks help, strong voice es­( 30-45). senttal. (35-50). MRS. SHUBERT-Very soda! blueblood cus­tomer. Lots of chatter. Hair Is shampooed and set each night. Gassy good looks help. (40-60). - Also seeking a Stage Manager and Assistant Stage Manager. - Listen to the treats that Man-to-Man has to offer. Dial 778-6689 FREE!!! The Best Just Got Betterl 976-0690 Man-to-Man Now get more bang! for your buck! 2 Sizzling Hours only $3 ----- Hook into the Network for free' Dial 778-6675. 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Alabama 524-4365 ORDER NOW AND MAKE LIFE A LITTLE EASIER IN THE HECTIC HOLIDAY SEASON SEPTEMBER 2, 1988 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 ACT UP Zapped Bush's Grand Riverboat Entrance By Rex Wockner FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE New York's AIDS Coalition To Unleash Power (ACT UP) zapped Republican Presidential candidate George Bush in New Orleans August 16 just moments after Bush made a grand riverboat en­trance into the city for the Republican National Convention. About 25 ACT UP members had man­aged to infiltrate a homogeneous crowd of thousands of Republicans awaiting Bush's arrival on the riverboat Natchez. Less than one minute into Bush's speech, the demonstrators hoisted "AIDSGATE" and "Silence equals Death" posters which they had kept con­cealed inside a large laundry bag. Immediately, some hundred TV cam­eras swung off Vice-President Bush and onto the protesters who chanted, "40,000 dead from AIDS: where was George?" Takin' It To The Streets To protect themselves, activists had joined arms and formed a large circle around the five persons hoisting the signs. Additional protection was provided by New Orleans police, who had been informed in advance that ACT UP in­tended to infiltrate the riverboat en­trance event. By Rex Wockner FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE Mayor Barthelemy was only the first in a long string of public figures to "get what they deserved" from ACT UP members in New Orleans. On Sunday of convention week, and ACT UP kiss-in began at the Marriott hotel and ended in front of the Catholic cathedral at Jack­son Square just as New Orleans Arch­bishop Philip Harinan emerged from Sunday mass to greet departing parish­ioners. NGLTF's Urvashi Vaid spotted him first and used her megaphone to urge Hannan to challenge the anti-gay activism growing inside the Catholic church. ACT UP members, accompanied by a hoard of reporters, quickly surrounded the archbishop, shouting, "Shame, shame, shame." HRCF's Robert Bray and ACT UP's Jack Ben-Levi stood in the cathedral entrance and kissed as the archbishop made a hasty retreat. As the convention formally opened on Monday, the California activist group March On staged a "die-in" at New Orle­ans city hall. About 150 persons helped chalk human body outlines on the plaza in front of the building while explaining to the media that government foot-drag­ging on AIDS is causing the unneces­sary deaths of thousands of Americans. Following the die-in, two heterosexual Republican women whose sons died of AIDS marched to the convention securi­ty checkpoint and asked to deliver to President Reagan a letter pleading for his assistance in the AIDS crisis. The women-Sue Caves of Long Beach, Cal­ifornia, and Barbara Cleaver of Los An­geles- -were denied entry to the Superdome, and thus made their plea to the press. "We're trying to bring AIDS home," said Cleaver. "This weekend is certainly a push beyond for us, from what we're used to. But we hope to represent moth­ers who are too frightened to speak out or are at home caring for the children." "My son's illness brought me here," said Caves. "It was the first time I looked at a bigger world than my own. At the hospital I saw another man's mom enter the room gloved, hatted and booted. I knew I had to get involved." The "mother's action," as it came to be called, was organized by San Francis­co's Mobilization Against AIDS in an attempt to demonstrate that the disease is "all-American." "This is a complete dream zap," said HRCF's Robert Bray in reference to an Aug. 15 party at the New Orleans Muse­um of Art sponsored by Phyllis Schla­fly's Eagle Forum, a homophobic, pro-"traditional-family" activist group. "Known homophobes" scheduled to at­tend the "Good Times Party" were for­mer Secretary of Education William Bennett, Judge Robert Bork, Senator Phil Gram, Congressman Jack Kemp and Ambassador Jeane Kirkpatrick. Although prevented from enteringthe museum, a coalition of activists from ACT UP, NGLTF, and HRCF stood about 100 yards away with a mega­phone. "Bush AIDS policies: No cure, no care,no comment," they chanted. "Hey, Phyllis," yelled John Thomas of Dallas, "we have seen your son and your daughter in gay bars. Send them out join our protest ... You have a whole hall offame of Republicans who have died of AIDS and you ignore it." Dignitaries arriving by car were greet­ed with "Welcome Bigots for Bush" shouts from protesters. Gay/Lesbian leaders at the conven­tion were also highly critical of George Bush's choice of Sen. Dan Quayle as a running mate. "The selection of.j ... Quayle ... raises serious concerns about the commitment of Vice President Bush and the Republican Party to fight­ing the nation's major health crisis," VOICE '88 said."Quayle has not sup­ported responsible AIDS policy and has opposed gay and lesbian civil rights." Specifically, activists said, Quayle vote five times to censor the content of AIDS educational material, opposed providing money for A'Cf to indigent people, opposed federal money for edu­cation programs that state homosexual­ity is "normal, natural or healthy," and voted to weaken the D.C. human rights law protecting lesbians and gays from discrimination. Quayle In Hand Is A Thom For Bush Some feminists, irked by what they view as the Republicans' attempt to capture the female vote by running Hollywood handsome Sen. Dan Quayle on the tick­et, ·are sarcastically calling themselves "Chicks for Quayle." Willie Banned At Baylor The folks at Baylor University don't think much of Willie Nelson's lifestyle. Nelson once. attended the Baptist school in Waco, Texas, but university officials canceled a concert he had scheduled on campus for Nov. 14 to ben­efit a good cause-the people who lost money in the demise of an uninsured bank in the small Texas town of Leroy. University President Herbert Rey­nolds issued a vague statement saying, "As a widely known and popular enter­tainer, Mr. Willie Nelson has had an un­usual opportunity to influence the people of this state and nation, and par­ticularly young people, to be responsi­ble, law-abiding citizens. It is our hope that he will use his influ­ence in the future to strengthen the mor­al fiber of our nation." He said the school sympathized with the people of Leroy but said, "Our con­cern for the health and well-being of the American people is an overriding one."' At a zap of President Reagan two days earlier, ACT UP members were elbowed and punched by angry Republicans shouting such things as "AIDS scum" and "You deserve to die." "This very beefy, jocky, blond, Arian Nazi-type guy kept elbowing his arm right into my neck," said ACT UP's Mar­ion Banzhaf. "A woman with him punched me in the stomach too." "They were an organized group of young Republicans," said ACT UP's Charles King. "The whole two hours we were waiting for Bush to arrive, they were jockeying their biggest people all around us. The pushing and shoving kept up the whole time. Then when we finally raised our signs, they started try­ing to kick and elbow me. Luckily, I got a cop jockeyed in between us." ACT UP members were able to hold their signs aloft for about five minutes before deciding they were imminent danger and requesting a police escort out of the crowd. As officers hustled the protesters away, people along the corri­dor grabbed for the "AIDSGATE" sign and punched at the demonstrators. "It was so awful," said ACT UP's Heidi Dorow. ''This one guy with an um­brella just crashed it down on Bill Blum's head." One ACT UP member was arrested during the fracas. Bobby O'Malley re­portedly attempted to hit a Republican and was charged by New Orleans police with disturbing the peace. "This is really turning out to be some week," commented an ACT UP organiz­er afterwards. "I've been called a 'fag' down here more times in three days than in the whole rest of my life. This town is full of Republicans, and we've been on the news enough that they see our "AIDSGATE" and "Silence equals Death" t-shirts, they know we're gay. It's really not safe to walk in this city this week." Houston Buyers Club A SERVICE FOR TEXANS FOR HEALTH (713) 522-2037 o~ • Egg Lecithin Ai!J.~8 \y_o0~ Ooscst Israeli formula & 7·2:1 rario ~'" ~ ~ Now $53.50 per mo. (30 packets) '-~ • De Veras Beverage (Stabilized Aloe beverage wirh carrisyn) NO CLUB FEES Call (713) 522-2037 BOYS' T0\91,, WEST HOLLYWOOD Scout deYoung and his lifelong best friend, Nash Aquilon, decide to make Boys' Town, West Holly· wood, their hometown. Their first goal: "to find lasting love in a time of disposable everything." But that pursuit is sidetracked by both the ridiculous - like the burglar who steals their porn and re-arranges the furniture - and by the harsh realities of AIDS and anti-gay violence. Through it all, Scout, Nash, and their friends create a family to help each other with a joke, a hand on the shoulder, and a warm, loving place to call home. "Boys' Town is fresh and distinctive. There's an honest laugh on nearly every page, a caring insight into gay life in the 1980s on every other," writes Richard Labonte, in the L.A. News. BOYS' TOWN by Art Bosch $7.95 in bookstores, or use this coupon to order. D Enclosed is $8.50 (postpaid) for one copy of Boys' Town. Name ---------- Address ---------- City---------- State Zip - ---- ilYSON PUBLICATIONS Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 WITH A WILI--THERE'S AWAY If you own anything-a car, house, savin~ acx:ount, anything with monetary value- you should have a will. know and trust. With a will, you save your loved ones considerable time and m<>­ney in the handling of your estate. Further, you are assured that your estate will not be executed by strangers, but by people you How do you make a will? First, see your lawyer. It's not all that expensive for most estate planning. He has the forms, knows the requirements of the state, and probably enough of your personal affairs to help in preparing for future management of your estate. You may change your will whenever and however you wish. The important thing is to get started and to do it right away. You may also include provision for funeral arrangements as part of the will. We can provide counseling, without obligation, on this aspect of your will, but ONLY this particular aspect. JAMES H. MURPHY FUNERAL DIRECl'ORS We welcome your questions and comltU!lllf- pnvaJei)' or publicly. through this cobunn, 523-1111 Fantutic Selection of All Male Action Movies at the Best Rental Rates Available THE NEXT VALENTINO at '11DEOTREND 1401 California 527-0656 Across from Jonathon's Immediate Opening Adver­tising Sales Montrose Voice Contact Henry McClura 529-8490 SEPTEMBER 2, 1988 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 ================================================ straight movies, but that's better than Houston's Gay Thirties By Richard Van Allen FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE They are old now, retired and a little aching here and there. But their memo­ries are good, down to names and places that made life for Houston gays in 1930's times to remember. There was the Rathskeller and the Old Vienna, the Capitol Bar and Rex's, the glory holes in the Old Milby Hotel's basement men's room. And cruising in Sam Houston Park by the still-standing Central Library. There was "window shopping" along Main Street where you could meet a newcomer in town. And always there was the Rice Hotel corner. "We didn't have gay bars in those days," said John, now 69 and born in Houston. "Everybody was in the closet, real deep. We met in the straight beer bars like the Rathskeller. And they didn't ask our ages. When I came out I was only 16, but they always let me in." The "gay circuit"-they didn't know the word "gay" -was downtown Hous­ton, between Franklin and McKinney and Main Street east to San Jacinto. You could not tell a queer or a fag (the words they used then) from the straight, which is the way the gays wanted it, being fear­ful for their lives and their jobs. No Jong hair, no leather, no cross-dressing in public. Some, however, were brave enough to have a spot of purple some­where, like the corner of a handkerchief peaking out of the pocket or some purple in their tie. "I don't know how we got into purple," said Jay, now a 79-year-old "married" gay. "But even then we didn't flaunt it. Not that the cops would pick us up­they left us alone except when they kicked us out of the public bathrooms. Saturdays could sometimes be rough be­cause of the Heights Gang. They used to come down and beat up queers. Me and my friends never got caught because a friend of mine was one of the Gang. He was straight, but I had tricked with him a few times. He used to call me and let me know when to stay home." Jay came to Houston in '31, back in the days of trolley cars, when he was 21. "We worked hard then. There was none of this 40-hour-a-week business so we didn't go out much during the week. Just on weekends. We'd drive our cars, if we had one, downtown in the afternoon and park them along Main Street, then take the streetcar home and come back later. That way we could trick in our cars. Parking downtown on weekends was bad even then." Main Street looking north, 1939, with Rice Hotel at left center One of the favorite bars was the Rathskeller, on Main between Franklin and Congress. It was run by a nice Ger­man woman who loved to dance with the boys. "It was oom-pah-pah music. We sure had a blast," Jay said. Dan is 76 now and cruised downtown after 1938. "Of course, we didn't know the word 'cruising' then. We called it 'window shopping' and just like now, you knew who was gay and who wasn't without asking. You could feel it, whether they had a limp wrist or not. There was this post down in front of Levy's department store. It had mirrors on four sides and queers would stop and comb their hair there. Oh, you could spot them. If we did want to trick, we could get a room at the Milby or the Texas State Hotel. More often we went home to our apartments." According to Dan, John and others who reminisced about the 30's, there was no such things as hustling, al­though some of the kids had sugar dad­dies. John explained."! think that's the big difference between then and today, ex­cept, of course, for AIDS. Back then we wanted friends and relationships. We'd meet in people's homes or apartments and run around together. If we has sex, it was kind of secondary to just knowing each other. Today, at least in the bars, it's hello and jump in the sack. People are too sex conscious today." What kind of sex did they have? "The usual," Jay said. "Just the sim­ple things. Nothing kinky like today . ... I suppose there was some kinky stuff going on, but no one ever mentioned it even at private parties." "There weren't as many things to do back then," Jay went on. "No book­stores, no porno books, no discos, no gay sports. We went to the movies a lot, espe­cially in the cheap theaters like the Irish, the Texas and the Uptown. You could pick up a trick there. One of the big thrills was riding the interurban trolley to Galveston on Saturdays. Go down in the morning, come back at night, burn­ed beet red." Then there were parties and celebra­tions. ·The best then as now was Hallow­een, about the only time gays could cross dress, but then, only in private homes. And for those who had the right connec­tions, there were stag movies in the fra­ternal orders like the Eagles and Shriners. Of course, they were all nothing. At least half of what you saw was delectable. Both Dan and Jay had lovers. John didn't until after World War II when he met David. They've been living together 40 years. Both are now on Social Securi­ty. "I was young and horny, then, John said. "And pretty damned cute, if I do say so myself. I really hit the bars, espe­cially Rathskeller and the Capitol. I re­me. mber once meeting two Catholic priest there-priest could wear sport shirts then. I went to bed with one of them-he was one great trick. Then there was Rex's. It stayed open until 3:30 a.m. Real good pickins' there." They had names for various kinds of people. There was the "trade," straight or bisexual men that only liked to get head. "Rough trade" were guys who beat up queers. The "A" gays were those who met only in private homes or apart­ments and didn't go to bars. World War II was the beginning of change in gay Houston. Most gays got drafted, not admitting their gayness like today. "I never ran into so many gays in my life until I joined the Army," said John. "Today, they just admit they're gay and stay out." Jay was 4-F and remained a civilian. "When Ellington Field got going strong, the servicemen poured into Houston on weekends. We once had a gay party at the Texas State Hotel and it got so wild the police raided it. They took some 15 of us down to jail. Somebody sprung the Ellington kids so they didn't get in trou­ble. I had to pay $10 bond to get out. Nothing ever came of it except there were no more wild parties at the Texas State Hotel, at least not until the 80's." Other things happened as the war be­gan. Girls came out of their homes to work in the shipyards and other indus­tries. Slacks were acceptable and pretty soon, lesbians began showing up in the bars. Eventually shipyard workers took over the Rathskeller and they were not friendly to gays. The Rex closed down. Then in 1943, and event occurred that would change gay life forever in Hous­ton. A man named Pete opened The Pink Elephant "way out of town" on Bell Street (it later moved to Leland). It ca­tered to gays. Things were never the same again, but the memories of the 30s are warming to those who cruised through them downtown on Main at the Rice Hotel corner. 10 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 2, 1988 TEXANS MAKE THE BEST PHONE PALS! NEED SOMEONE TO TALK TO .. . WANT SOMEONE TO TALK WITH .. . JUST CALL' 713 976-3833 MEET YOUR NEXT -FRIEND -BUDDY -LOVER r~:~ 976-DUDE AN EXCITING WAY TO MAKE NEW FRIENDS. A SERVICE CHARGE OF $3.00 + TOLL IF ANY. NO CREDIT CARDS ARE NECESSARY. YOU MUST BE 18 YEARS OF AGE TO CALL. Announcing! Marion Pantzer Women's Program Includes: • Physical Examination • Breast Cancer Exam • PAP Smear • STD* Exam •Lab Work Treatment • Education HIV(AIDS) Antibody Testing/ Counseling and other Immune system services also available. Call for more information. Be informed ... Stay Healthy MONTROSE C·Ll·N·l·C 1200 Richmond Avenue•Houston•Texas•77006 528-5531 Clinic Hours: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday & Friday 6:00p.m.-9:30p.m. Saturday 8:00a.m.-11 :30a.m. & 1 :00p.m.-4:30p.m. Male/Female Sunday 1 :00p.m.-4:30p.m. *Sexually Transmitted Disease This publ ic service announcement provided through a gift from William Marberry Se habla Espafiol SEPTEMBER 2, 1988 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 Gay America Gay Community Events Nationw i de and Wor ldwide .. AIDS Activist Mobilization Planned For October ACT NOW (AIDS Coalition To Network, Organize, and Win) is organizing a four-day, national AIDS activist mobilization, including a teach-in and conference and an AIDS-relat­ed rally and civil disobedience, October 8-11 in Washington, D.C. The conference will begin on Saturday, October 8, with a National AIDS Activist Teach­in, featuring workshops, round-table discussions, and caucuses concerning the building of AIDS activism at the local national levels. ACT NOW member organizations will meet Sunday, October 9, to develop strategies and plan future actions. Both days are open to all individuals working in or interested in joining the AIDS activist movement. A rally demanding a compassionate, comprehensive, and informed government re­sponse to AIDS will be held at the Department of Health and Human Services on Monday, October 10, 4-6 p.m. "Seize Control of the F.D.A.," a massive civil disobedience action will take place at 7 a.m. on October 11. at the Food and Drug Administration headquarters in Rockville, Mary­land. Protesters will be demanding the release of all promising AIDS treatments and equal access to those treatments for all affected communities. Individuals not wishing to be arrested are asked to work as support for those who will risk arrest. " It's time to show the people in power, the bureaucrats, and the nation that we will not politely accept excuses and death anymore. We want treatments released now," asserted Margie Edouardo, a member of ACT NOW's conference planning committee. ACT NOW is a coalition consisting of over 30 AIDS activists organizations from across the nation including numerous local ACT UPs (AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power). Chicago for AIDS Rights, OUT! in Washington, D.C., and others. ACT NOW coordinated the Spring AIDS Actions, nine days of nationwide protests and education focusing on the epidemic held in May. For more information on participating in and organizing in your community for the conference, the direct action, and joining ACT NOW, please call 202/234/ 8801 or write ACT NOW, PO Box 73275, Washington, DC 20056-3275 . .. Until That Last Breath: Women With AIDS NGLTF brings first-ever exhibit on subject to Washington. A dramatic and poignant photographic exhibition depiction the rage, resilience, and raw emotion of a hidden population - Women With AIDS, opens for an exclusive Washington , D.C. showing, in conjunction with the return of the National Memorial AIDS Quilt. Until That Last Breath will show at the Collector Gallery and Restaurant from October 3rd through 10th. Nationally acclaimed documentary photographer, Ann Meredith, offers an intimate look into the lives of women with AIDS - with their families and friends. alone at home, on the street. Meredith has combined the inevitable tragedy of this disease with the courage and strength each woman exudes as she lives out her commitment to living the life that she left in a meaningful way. Through photography, video and sculpture the exhibition portrays the personal strug­gles hopes and fears experienced by Women who have AIDS. Until That Last Breath consists of 50 bold black and white portraits ranging in size from 16 x 20 x 40. "Until That Last Breath draws attention to a forgotten element of the AIDS crisis," said Kimberly Moore Webster, Director of Development at the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, the exhibit's sponsor. The percentage of Women with AIDS has doubled in the past six years. and Meredith's photographs call attention to the fact that the AIDS epidemic is taking a severe toll among women and children as well." Webster continues, "The National Gay and Lesbian Task Force is proud to bring Until That Last Breath to Washington during the week when the NAMES Project Quilt makes its return to D.C. By adding this photographic depiction of Women with AIDS, lives to the activities and events of this week, we hope to offer another dimension of awareness to people's consciousness about the full impact of what AIDS is doing to our world today." "What we see through these portraits is how AIDS is changing the lives and hearts of these women," explains Ann Meredith. "More importantly, we see the commitment that these women have made to continue on with their lives in a meaningful way" An opening reception will be held on Thursday, October 6th, from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Collector Restaurant and Gallery, 1630 U Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. For more informa­tion on the exhibit, call Kimberly Moore Webster, NGLTF, (202) 332-6483. Activists Accuse Medical Society Of Bribery By Rex Wockner FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE Members of the Illinois Gay and Lesbi­an Task Force (IGLTF) and Chicago for AIDS Rights (C-FAR) demon strated out­side the Loop offices of the Illinois State M edical Society (ISMS) Aug. 25, pr otest­ing an A IDS bill which t hey say the I SMS bough t from the Illinois legisla­t ure. A t t he same time, the AIDS Fou n ­dation of Chicago, a m ain stream fundraising organi zation, h eld a press confer ence to denounce the legislation. House Bill 4005, which awaits action by Governor James Thompson, would allow doctors in Illinois to test for HIV antibodies without a patient's knowl­edge, "completely gutting," activists say, Illinois AIDS Confidentiality Act. Currently in Illinois, and HIV antibody test requires informed written consent from the patien t. The section of the legislation allowing secret testing was tagged onto HB 4005 by conservative anti-gay legislator (and Presidential HIV Commission member) Penny Pullen during the final two days of the legislative session. IGLTF's legis­lative chair, Tim Drak e, says the amend­men t br eezed through the legislature because the ISMS, the largest lobbyist in the state, contributed over $415,000 to legislators and the governor last year. ")~ q 'l rrrq:i 12 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 2, 1988 AIDS FOUNDATION HOUSTON, INC. Presents Performed At Chocolate Bayou Theatre · 4205 San Felipe Sept. 8-11 Sept.15-18 Curtain 8:00pm (NO LATE SEATING) Tickets $5.00 For Ticket Information 623-6796 This production has been underwritten by Aids Foundation Houston, Inc. as part of its educational outreach. Educational presentation and discussion will follow each performance. Letters to the Voice From the Readers of the Montrose Voice r:EJRainbo De Klown Tells His Side Of The Story From Rainbo de Klown As LGPW Parade 88 Co-chairman, it is now time for me to tell my side of the story. First, I would like to thank all the beautiful people who participated in the '88' parade. Every unit of the lesbian Gay Pride Week Parade was great and I appreciated the work of the artsy-crafty minds of this community who took time to build floats: I hope all units will plan to participate again next year. My objective for the '88' parade was to make it a fun parade, a celebration of PRIDE, with a host of variety with no discrimination against anyone (concerning our gay and lesbian lifestyles). As parade co-chairs, we refused no one who wanted to participate. We even accepted one entry while the parade was moving down Westheimer. Not one lifestyle of the gay/lesbian community took priority. The '88' pride parade had variety including; leather, western, everyday street wear, serious and camp comedy drag, political. religious and non religious. community services, business, and entertainment. The best "Part Of" the parade was the largest contingent of people ever, with many people participating for the first time Comments from these people were positive. "The adrenalin of (their) pride accelerated as (they) made (their) way around the curve and seen all the beautiful people, cheering". That has been said to me many times. The sad.des! part of planning the event was those having lack of interest in participating and then hearing and reading their criticism. There has been an issue made in the editorials concerning the campy drag queens and the porno star. The word used in the editorials in IMAGE. As a former state news reporter, if I would have covered the parade, I would have done research on the Montrose area commu­nity and find that camp comedy drag is "A Part Of" the gay lifestyles. Yes, I would have found camp drag in the local two gay medias year long, and not just on three special holidays. We criticize the state media for their coverage of the parade, but do you remember the photo on the front page post parade issue of the local gay press, sssshhhh yes it was the Garden Party unit. Also concerning the porno star, two gay medias accept full and half page advertising for the local porno theater. I ask you, as parade co-chairman, how can I discriminate and be hypocritical and not allow those people in the parade, when they are "A Part Of" us, like it or not. The statement, camp drag is offensive to women, I say that is hogwash. I have never heard of a woman or woman's group protest Benny Hill, Ms. Divine, Brathon Winters, Miss 'Be Sweet' sister KILT, Uncle 'Miltie' Searle drag antics and the multitudes of others. I have never read an editorial about how offensive it was to see three men with beards and moustaches, wearing pink tutu's participating- in the annual Foley's Christ­mas Parade. One thing I learned recently from clown school, there are all types of clowns. They include the whitefacP, auguste. and character. Camp drag is considered as a character clown. The Ringling E os. and Barnum Bailey Circus have a couple of camp drag character clowns. Clowns are as ,ed to be involved in parades to provide entertainment and fun for the viewers. There were 50 plus units in the parade, and 5 flamboyant drag units. I believe the people who are out and about know that those units are involved in the community besides holidays. They are the same people who raise money through out the year for the many organiza­tions that preceded them in the parade route; including the AIDS Foundation. Omega House, Stone Soup, Montrose Clinic, and the like. Underneath the big pink triangle representing their lifestyle they have the biggest Red Heart of love for our community and its needs. The funds they raise supplement what the city of Houston and other government and non-profit organizations "could not or would not'', provide. The image of the 84 parade did not influence the city of Houston to vote for the controversial referendum in January 1985. At the recent committee meeting for the '89' Pride Week, after my report of the parade, I opened the meeting for comments, I was ready for anything. Only one comment was made-it was from a woman in the back row. She said concerning the 88 parade "It was Wonderful" ... and applause from the overflow­ing crowd, came later. I busted my butt, but I hope the applause wasn't just for me, but for all the people who participated in LGPW PARADE-I just organized it. Thanks to parade co-chair Ray Hill who gave me advise on city permits, insurance, and the like. Any comments about future editorials please call 781-6407. I will address any issue. Jte'!1s here are opinions of readers. Publlcat10n does not infer a concurrmg view by the publisher of the Voice. When sending letters for publ1cat1on. please keep bflef and mail to Letters. Montrose Voice, 408 Avondale. Houston, TX n006. All must be signed and include address and phone (which will not b6 published) to venfy authenticity. Name can b8 withheld. §AME DAY TYPE~ §ETTER§ Rt 'l'VJ>ES'l'VI.ES '.£0 CHOOSE PH.OM Pick Up and Delivery Available (SS charge) 408 AVONDALE - 529-8490 SEPTEMBER 2, 1988 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 ================================================ gave us 15 years ago. We're now going to Rebel With A Cause: Arniy Sgt. Perry Watkins By Rex Wockner FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE U.S.Army Sergeant Perry Watkins was thrust into the gay/lesbian spotlight last Feb. 10 when a federal appellate court in San Francisco ruled that dis­crimination against gays in the armed services wrongly "caters to private bi­as." The ruling-the first ever opposing military discrimination against gays­further defined gay men and lesbians as a "suspect class," like women racial mi­norities, and aliens. Gay activists immediately hailed the decision as "earth-shattering." Leonard Graff of National Gay Rights Advo­catt>. s said, "the court said that there are constitutional protections for lesbians and gay men. The court rejected all the reasons offered by the army to keep gays and lesbians out of the service." Watkins had informed the Army he was gay when he enlisted in 1967, and several times thereafter. Despite being an "admitted homosexual," Watkins re' ceived consistently glowing evaluations from his superiors during his 15 years of service. "One of our most respected and trusted soldiers," wrote his command­ing officer. For reasons unexplained, Watkins was nonetheless discharged in 1984 for being gay. The army has appealed the recent ruling in Watkins' favor and the matter is expected to be reheard later this year. Rex Wockner: What's the exact status of your case at present: PW: The Ninth Circuit has agreed to rehear it with an eleven-judge panel rather than a three-judge panel. The ear­lier decision has been nullified, not re­versed, just nullified. Once they agree to rehear a case, it's like the case has not been heard at all. So, basically, we're right back where we were when I was put out in 1984. RW: When might the rehearing be? PW: We ought to know by the begin­ning of October. Since the government is requesting the rehearing, it'll probably be expedited. RW: Do you have any information on the mindset of those 11 people? PW: I have no idea whatsoever. I don't event try to speculate. It's not worth worrying about. All I can hope is tha, people will come in with the attitude t.o judge facts. It was a big problem for me my first three years out of the military being very, very concerned about what was going to happen. I worried a lot, !'nd wasn't motivated to do anything. N0w, at least, with Rebel with A Cause foun­dation (a national speaking tour featur­ing Watkins), I've got my mind on :ither things. Most important, though, is that be­cause of the "suspect class" rnlir.g, this is not just about me. It now affe-:ts every gay man and lesbian VI oruan in the United States of America. It's much more that whet\ler Perry Watkins get retirement. RW· -• .:m've said that all of the people you worked with in the Army knew that you were gay. You even did some drag shows on base. How is it that this came to a head when it did? PW: You know, I have no idea. You'd simply have to ask the military. I do know for a fact that people in the Penta­gon were calling Fort Lewis, Washing­ton and ordering my commanding officer to do things. He told me so him­self. He also told me he'd never go to Perry Watkins- U.S. Army Sergeant court and admit that because it would end his career. RW: It was 1981 that they originally started harassing you? PW: Yes, it was 1981 that I first went into court, I didn't get diGcharged until 1984. RW: What happened in 1Y81? PW: They wanted to revoi':<! my securi­ty clearance because I was ;Jay. It's ir.­teresting to note that they didn't decil ~ that my being gay was important enough for me to be thrown out until I actually took them to court. As long as I was willing to sit back and let them r>7 voke my ckarance, it was all right for me to be gay and remain in the Arll7y. RW: What was the purpose of your security clearance? PW: It was just a routine requirement for my job. RW: Were you completely out of the closet outside of the Army? I ask be­cause the military always brings up the issue of susceptibility to blackmail. PW: If you tell someone that you're gay in 1967, and they don't draft you into the military until 1968, and they themselves repeatedly address the issue specifically of you're being gay, and put information in writing into your records that, yes, you are gay but it obviously is not detrimental, how can you possibly be a blackmail threat? RW: There was continuous informa­tion in your files? PW: Continuously, repeatedly. That's what was interesting about the revoca­tion of my security clearance. It was the fourth time they had done this to me. The first three times they did it, I didn't say anything, and then they would come back three months later and say, "Never mind, you can have it back. Since you're an admitted homosexual, you're not a security risk." The Army made that determination themselves, that I was suitable for military service. Then, when they decided they wanted to put me out, their argument in court was, "Well, we have no idea how the man managed to avoid the system." It's absolutely ludicrous. In addition to not being happy with the military, I'm also not very happy with the judicial system that will look at the military and say it's my fault that I managed to be in there for 15 years and the Army owes me noth­ing. That bothers me. RW: You seem to have them in a logi­cal bind. PW: Of course I do. That's why the courts are batting.this back and forth. There's nothing to substantiate the claim that I can't function in the Army. The Army is the one that kept saying I could. Also, please remember, I requested discharge three times because I was gay and the Army said no every time. This was during the first six months I was in the service. Once, I gave them a state­ment admitting that I'd had sexual rela­tionships. They investigated the statement for three months, and then came back and said, "Well, we can't prove that this ever happened, so you have to stay in." Then in 1984, they said, "Well, we have this staterr,ient that you say that it's true that you co=itted these acts and now you're gone." I find it abhorrent that our justice system lets this through. RW: What have you been doing since 1984? PW: I file<! bankruptcy. I lost my house. I worked for a while for the Social Se-::urity Administration for $5.77 an hour and decided that wasn't really what I wanted to do. Every time I ap­plied for a mid-level management job, however, the first question out of their mouths was, "Well, gee, you're perfectly qualified for the position, but why didn't you stay in the Anny five more years until you could have retired?" Then I have to go through the whole thing of what happened, and I never get called back. RW: What do you hope to accomplish with your Rebel With A Cause founda­tion? PW: It makes me feel real good that we might be able to do something to im­prove life for everyune in America, but particularly for gays and lesbians. That has, after all, been my life all along. I didn't know anything else. I was n~ver in the closet. I don't know what it's real­ly like to be in the closet. The gay and lesbian community has never deserted me. They've always accepted me as I am-bizarre and strange and with my quirks. But, we as a community, accept people like that. 'Ve are a wonderful group of people ar.d we're getting the short end of the stick. Rebel With A Cause is out there trying to make that not happen anymore. Rollins Enters Plea Television and movie actor Howard Rol­lins Jr. has pleaded innocent in Louisi­ana state court to charges of speeding, driving while intoxicated and posses­sion of cocaine. The plea was made Aug. 24 through his attorney, Jim Boren. Boren said a status conference on the case was set by Judge Freddie Pitcher for Sept. 22. Rollins, who is filming a TV remake of "In the Heat of the Night" with Carroll O'Connor, was stopped March 27 in Ba­ton Rouge after a state trooper said he clocked the actor's car at speeds in ex­cess of 100 mph. Happy Hooker Debra Murphree, the streetwalker in­volved with the Rev. Jimmy Swaggart, has some bright financial prospects even though she's just been packed off to jail on her fourth prostitution convic­tion, her lawyer says. Murphree was sentenced to six months and fined $500 for her latest prostitution conviction. The case doesn't involve Swaggart but Judge Wallace LeBrun in Baton Rouge, La., said he imposed the harsh­est sentence allowable because Murph­ree had "a lot of notoriety around the country and because she has three previ­ous convictions." Murphree's lawyer, Thomas Weyman, intends to appeal the sentence. Weyman says Murphree already has capitalized on the Swaggart affair - recreating the poses she said the preach­er had her strike in the pages of Penthouse-and isn't through yet. Weyman says he is negotiating a book deal that will pay a minimum of$25,000 and a movie deal also might be in the works with an asking price of $150,000. 14 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 2, 1988 Gay Lib Gains Strength In Latin America By John Hubert FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE The past five years have seen a signifi­cant Lesbian and Gay development in most of Latin America. The oldest groups such as the Grupo Gay de Bahia (GGB), the Grupo Acao Lesbica Femi­nista (GALF), both of Brazil, the Grupo Orgullo Homosexual de Liberation (GOHL) of Mexico and the Movimiento Homosexual de Lima (MHOL) of Peru, are all seven to eight years old. In Argentina, the Comunidad Homo­sexual Argentina (Argentina Gay Com­munity) was founded in 1984 upon the end of the military dictatorship and the ascension of the democratically elected President Raul Alfonsin. Homosexuals had been forced to either leave the coun­try or go underground during the years of the military dictatorship. Since 1984, CHA, which is made up of eight Argenti­nean lesbian and gay groups, has grown in strength as they have had to battle continuously the anti-gay opression and intimidation carried out by the police. In 1987 the Alfonsi,1 government at­tempted to enforce a 1946 law which spe­cifically denied the right to vote to homosexuals. An international letter campaign headed up by CHA and the International Lesbian and Gay Associ­ation (ILGA), headquartered in Sweden, resulted in a flood of letters to the Casa Rosada, Argentina's White House, which ended the attempts to revive the anti-gay law and a government promise to repeal it. BRAZIL has two of the oldest groups in Latin America. The Grupo Gay <la Bahia (Gay Group of the State of Bahia) is located in northeast Brazil in the city of Salvador. GGB in their eight years of existence have taken the lead in Brazil n promoting knowledge of AIDS and safe sex practices. They have worked to over­come the police and mass media preju­dice against gay people and were in the forefront of the national fight to get the Federal Health Code amended in 1985 so that homosexuality would no longer be classified as a disease. GGB, which has a majority of Black members, was the first group in Latin America to join the International Lesbi­an and Gay Association and for two years served as the ILGA Latin Ameri­can Secertariat. In 1987 the ILGA decid­ed to regionalize Latin America into four areas with GGB being one of the official Information Pools, the other three being CHA of Buenos Aires, Ar­gentina, MHOL of Lima, Peru, and GOHL of Guadalajara, Mexico., Grupo Acao Lesbica Feminista (the Lesbian Feminist Action Group) is also eight years old and is the oldest Lesbian group in Latin America. They published an information magazine in Portuguese and are very much involved in the femi­nist movement in Sao Paulo. Two other groups, both about three years old, are Lambda Sao Paulo and Triangulo Rosa (Pink Triangle) of Rio de Janeiro. These two groups recently led a national campaign to get Congress to include a clause to explicitly forbid discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation in the new Federal Constitu­tion as it was being written. CHILE suffers under a right wing mil­itary government that views homosexu­ality as a threat to the State. Gay establishments are often raided by the police in order to obtain names which they will use for later searches "for rea­sons of danger to public health and mo­rals." The 1980 Constitution dictated by the military government states, "Any person, or persons, organizations or groups that upset the establishment or­der, the Family, the State, or Private Property will be treated with all the se­verity of the law as an act of subversion and terrorism against the present sys­tem of authority." Under these circumstances, it is ex­tremely dangerous for Lesbians and Gays to get organized. The only group in Chile is the dynamic three year old Colectiva Lesbica Feminista Ayu­quelen. "Ayuquelen" means "joy" in the language of the Mapuche Indians. Ayu­gelen, with financial help form Europe­an and USA groups, has participated in the First Latin American Lesbian Infor­mation Service Conference in 1986 in Geneva and the 1988 International Les­bian and Gay Association Conference held in July in Oslo, Norway. PERU, on the South American west coast, sports two organizations, one a mixed male and female organization, the Movimiento Homosexual de Lima (MHOL), and the other a lesbian femi­nist group, called Grupo de Autocon­ciencia de Lesbianas Feministas (GALF). MHOL has served one year as the ILGA Latin American Secretariat and presently they are continuing their in­ternational involvement as on of four Latin American ILGA Information Pools. MHOL publishes a magazine cov­ering political and consciousness raisin, health, international news and cultural activities. They also work with the polit­ical parties to gain their open support for gay rights. The Women's Secretariat provides support and activities of special interest to women. Their library of publications from around the world is used for re­search by students in Peru. Recently MHOL has added two new workshops; a Spiritual Workshop which meets week­ly, and a Music Workshop, which teach­es music theory and practice, both voice and instruments. GALF has been very active in the na­tional feminist movement as well as in­ternationally. They attended the 1985 ILGA World Conference in Toronto as well as the 4th Latin American Feminist Conference in Sao Paulo, Brazil. They also participated in the ILIS Conference in Switzerland in 1986 and the Latin American Lesbian Conference in Mexi­co in 1987. GALF organizes Conscious­ness raising workshops for lesbians and they publish a bulletin called Al Mar­gen. COLOMBIA has a number of groups with the oldest and most active being the Colectivo de Orgullo Gay (Gay Pride Collective). CORG, founded four years ago by a group of students, publishes a magazine called De Ambiente. VENEZUELA has only one active or­ganization today, called the Citizen's Action Committee Against AIDS which mainly works with Venezuela's televi­sion and radio stations, as well as the major newspapers. They have also pre­pared an informative bulletin about AIDS for the general public. URU­GUAY presently has a small group, Grupo Somos, who are trying to do something to improve the situation for lesbians and gays in their country. Assassinations In Brazil, Singapore Threats Gay Happenings Worldwide by John Hubert FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE The Grupo Gay da Bahia (GGB), the eight year old gay activist group, locat­ed in the city of Salvador in the State of Bahia, in northeast Brazil, reports that the rash of murders throughout the county continues. GGB has detailed the names, ages, oc­cupations and manners of death of278 gay victims so far, all motivated by anti­gay sentiments and AIDS-phobia. In­cluded are the rich and famous, professionals and street people. The latest issue of the "Boletm Do GGB", which comes out 3 times a year, dedicated two of its eight pages to detail­ing the macabre facts about the 35 gays who were victims of macho violence in Brazil since their previous issue. GGB says the anti-gay violence in increasing, especially in Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro. During the past year several people killed on the streets of Rio's slums had notes attached to their corps­es saying, "Now I can no longer spread AIDS." In Sao Paulo, police estimate the rate of anti-gay murder is double that of a year ago. At least twenty well-known gay men have been murdered in their homes in recent months, 8 in Sao Paulo and 12 in Rio de Janeiro. Theater director and actor Luis An­tonio Martinez Correa was one of the most recent victims, whose death has provoked a public response to the anti­gay violence. Luis Antonio's brother, Jo­se Celso, also a theater director, has gathered the support and signatures of 200 artists and intellectuals for a mani­festo protesting the attacks. "It's a political crime to intimidate gay people by these organized terrorist death squads, which are backed by the authorities," stated Celso. According to the ILGA Bulletin the manifesto was delivered to Rio de Janeiro city council by a group of 150 people. Fernanda Montenegro, one of Brazil's best known actresses, read the manifesto aloud to the council. The manifesto protests the brutal anti-gay murders as well as the indifference with which the authorities have investigated the crimes against homosexuals. Officials in Singapore have warned that victims of AIDS can be fired from jobs, charged with murder or face civil lawsuits should they spread the deadly virus. According to "The New Straits Times", the principle. newspaper of Malaysia, which is connected to the is­land state of Singapore by causeway, the witch hunt is very real for AIDS suf­ferers. In a crackdown on homosexuals to thwart the spread of AIDS and for homophobic "morality" reasons, police have banned gays from nightclubs, lounges, bars and discos. The produc­tion of a play about AIDS was halted by the government due to its sympathetic treatment of homosexuality. Addition­ally, police are now picking up suspected gays in parks and other long time cruis­ing areas and requiring blood tests. Let­ters of protest can be sent to Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew, Government House, Singapore, Singapore. In Hong Kong, the government has started discussing the decriminaliza­tion of gay acts/sex which presently carry a life term. Recently, despite the unreasonable penalties, more people have been willing to "come out" and confront the anti-gay propaganda. Les­bians and gay men have been inter-viewed on television and some gay plays have been performed. The Hong Kong 10 Percent Club is still going, but lacks organization and a sense of activist direction according to reports from Hong Kong. Apparently they prefer cruising activities to libera­tiqn strategies. The city's other group, the Long Yang Club, is chiefly social. More From Springsteen Bruce Springsteen is coming out with a four-song live record that will benefit Amnesty International, the human rights organization. It will include the Bob Dylan song "Chimes of Freedom," which was rec­orded at a Stockholm concert, and three tunes from a stand in Los Angeles last spring-"Tougher than the Rest," "Be True" and "Born to Run." The record will appear in early Sep­tember, which is when Springsteen goes on tour for Amnesty International with Peter Gabriel, Sting and Tracy Chap­man. Video Reviews: 'Broadcast News' By Jack E. Wilkinson United Press International FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE What's new on the home video scene .. . MOVIES "Broadcast News"-A sunny sashay through the high-energy, glitzy world of television news and its tricky mix of press and pizzazz. Jane (Holly Hunter) is the TV network's brilliant young Washington producer, totally commit­ted, totally in control. Complications set in, though, when she meets Tom (Wil­liam Hurt), a dense but handsome hunk imported as the new correspondent. Completing the rather hopeless roman­tic triangle is Aaron (Albert Brooks), a crackerjack reporter but without the necessary on-camera tools, forever in the wings with both the network and Jane. Add Jack Nicholson in a funny cameo appearance as his highness, the network anchor. All in all, writer-direc­tor James L. Brooks has fashioned a bright, breezy comedy with exceptional acting and some sharp jabs at TV and the folks who put the muse in the eve­ning news. 1987. 132 minutes. CBS-Fox Video. Rated R. $89.98. "Frantic"-Harrison Ford plays an American doctor in Paris for a conven­tion when his wife (Betty Buckley) is suddenly kidnapped for no apparent reason. Convinced neither the Ameri­can consulate nor the police is doing enough, he takes it on himself to find the kidnappers. Learning an airport lug­gage mixup triggered the abduction and with the help of a pretty Parisian (Emmanuelle Seigner), he delves deeper into the disappearance only to find him­self in the midst of a dangerous high­tech smuggling scheme. This Roman Polanski thriller has its moments, but unfortunately, it also has a tendency to go leaden. 1988. 120 minutes. Warner Home Video. Rated R. $89.95. "18 Again!"-Another of those body swapping yarns. An 81-year-old swing­ing bachelor, Jack (George Bums) has everything but youth. His wish comes true when, during an auto accident, he switches bodies with his 18-year-old grandson David (Charlie Schlatter.) Though many of the man-boy situations are familiar, this one strives for more insight than the others. Jack, as David, now discovers what people really think of the old man and sets out, with a nar­row deadline, to put some things right. It's mostly Schlatter's picture since Bums is not on long. 1988. 100 minutes. New World Video. Rated PG. $89.95. "Consuming Passions"-In this Brit­ish black comedy of the "Eating Raoul" school, a bumbling junior executive ac­cidentally dumps three workers into a revolving vat of chocolate, thus creating a new taste sensation. The bumbler, Ian (Tyler Butterworth), is immediately pro­moted for saving the chocolate factory, but is now expected to keep the new in­gredient coming. In an odd bit of cast­ing, Vanessa Redgrave plays a flamboyant, over-sexed kook, a widow from that original batch, who also is Ian's responsibility. Amusing in a weird sort of way, based on a story by Michael Palin and Terry Jones of the old Monty Python troupe. 1988. 98 minutes. Virgin Vision. Rated R. $79.95. COMEDY "Jackie Mason On Broadway"­Jackie Mason is a hoot with his unique brand of rapid-fire ethnic satire, edited from his hit Broadway show, "The World According To Me." And, accord-ing to him, there's a chuckle behind eve­ry foible. His targets include Jews and gentiles, Poles and Italians, dating ritu­als and the Reagan administration. Just about everything and everybody is fair game. 60 minutes, from HBO Video, $89.95. VIDBITS "Anna," for which Sally Kirkland won an Oscar nomination, reaches home video Nov. 2, as does a new version of "And God Created Woman" with Re­becca De Mornay updating Brigette Bardot's starmaking role, from Vestron ... "Fatal Attraction" (Paramount) was chosen best dramatic movie of the year by the Video Software Dealers Associa­tion. "Dirty Dancing" (Vestron) won best musical, "Crocodile Dundee" (Para­mount) best comedy, "Lady And The Tramp" (Disney) best children's movie. Also, "Lethal Weapon" (Warner) action­adventure, "Predator" (CBS-Fox) sci-fi, "The Lost Boys" (Warner) horror and "Hope. And Glory" (Nelson) foreign. BILLBOARD'S Top 10 rentals 1. Good Morning, Vietnam- Touch­stone Home Video 2. Suspect-RCA-Columbia Home Video 3. Wall Street-CBS-Fox Video 4. D.O.A.-Touchstone Home Video 5. Fatal Attraction- Paramount Home Video 6. Eddie Murphy Raw-Paramount Home Video 7. Empire of the Sun-Warner Home Video 8. Full Metal Jacket-Warner Home Video 9. Planes, Trains and Automobiles­Paramount Home Video 10. Action Jackson-Lorimar Home Video Dressed To Pierce Pierce Brosnan, who heads Us maga­zine's most stylish list, has a simple for­mula for looking suave. "If it feels good, wear it," says the for­mer star of "Remington Steele," who ad­mitted using his wife's cosmetics. "And always make sure your fly's done up, whatever you're wearing." Brosnan recently culled his wardrobe after filming "The Deceivers" in India, saying, "You see somebody live with a pair of shorts, old shoes and a T-shirt and you realize how much baggage you have." But his closet still sounds like it holds enough to clothe a Third World coun­try- about 35 suits, 100 shirts, five tuxe­dos, 50 to 60 ties. Joining him on the Us list of stylish stars are singer Sade; Corbin Bernsen of "L.A. Law;" actresses Anjelica Huston Kirstie Alley and Farrah Fawcett; Mi'. chael Douglas's wife, Diandra; comedi­ans Jay Leno and Arsenio Hall; and Princess Caroline. Baby Ross Singer-actress Diana Ross gave birth to a boy last Friday. Ross, 44, and husband Arne Naess Jr. have three children from previous marriages. This was their second together. Ross spokesman Elliot Mintz wouldn't say where the birth took place. SEPTEMBER 2, 1988 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 NOWfBAS9NQ The Gardens LJ.rge Beautiful Swimming Pool Hot ou6 & Spa Controlled Sntry Security Remote Controlled Qarage Sntry High Sf(iciency AC & Heating [usfi Professional fandscaping One Bedroom-1 Bath Luxury Condos in the Creative Center of the City 2507 Montrose Houston, Texas 77006 524-0830 One Bedroom with Coft-1 Bath 0wo Bedroom-uwo Bath owo Bedroom-owo Bath 0ownhouse 'Jrom $375.00 a Month Y2 Month '3ree Rent Upon Qualification (New Ceases Only) Office Open Monday-'Jriday 9am-5pm FIRST --r HoMECARE:HouSTON I • Pentm1\ldlne INHALATION THERAPY INYOUR HOME OR OUR OFFICE •PC-55 8oz $26.75 plus tax • SPECIALIZING IN ALL HEALTH CARE SERVICES D Private Duty Nurses D Home Health Aides D IV Therapy 785-8484 •Anonymous 8c Confidential HIV testing. Elisa and Western blots with pre 8c post test counseling For HIV testing in1ormation and appointments l _ 785-8580 Monday through Friday 9:00am to 5:00pm ~--'"--~~~~~~~~~~~ 16 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 2. 1988 'Hot, Fat, Sassy': Two Out Of Three Ain't Bad Delia Stewart Dance Co. (Miller Out­door, 2 and 3 at 8:30). Blue Notes at the Top Grill (Kuumba House Repertory Theater, 2)-benefit performance. ONO! A Virus Knows No Morals (MFA, 3 at 8PM)-SWAMP also presents this mov­ie by German avant garde director Rosa Von Praunheim. ONO! Randy Jobe, Marsha Carlton and Michael Bailey in "Hot, Fat and Sassy-a Totally Rude Revue" at the Comedy Workshop. By Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice A&E Editor FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE Two thirds of "Hot, Fat and Sassy-a Totally Rude Revue" are one of the bet­ter club act/musical revues I've seen in Houston. I onlyiope that the three stars think of this as a work in progress. If so, they'll jettison two bad numbers, find better replacements and wind up with a show that's a thorough delight from one end to the other. It might even have happened by the time you read this review. Marsha Carlton is one of my favorite singers, and, I think, has a broad-based appeal. (Take that one any way you want to.) It would be extremely difficult, though not impossible, for her to get a bad review out of me for anything. She's great here. Surprise, surprise. Randy Jobe I have mixed feelings about. He can be knock-you-dead dyna­mite, but it requires spot-on aim. If he misses at all, it's usually disastrous. I heard through the grape-vine that he's getting tired of doing drag. (He al­ways does two or three high-camp bits in each show.) That may be true. He seems to have lost some of his flair for the out­rageous. One of the two scenes that don't work ends the first act with Marsha as Dolly Parton artd Randy as Carol Chailning as Dolly Levi. He's the reason it doesn't work. The other looser takes half the second act to retell "Gone With the Wind." His Scarlett O'Hara is not the reason it falls flat. But he can't save it, either. It has two problems. One, it is far, far too long. Two, it uses the attempts to act of two volunteers from the audiences. Yucko. Bad idea. But the basic idea-rewriting the lyr­ics of old TV sitcoms to tell this story could be real cute. (It worked for Mad Magazine, didn't it?) Cut the audience participation, trim the songs, makeitan opera and it could be a smashing suc­cess. Randy is very, very good as himself and excellent as the mother superior of a convent. Maybe he's just going through a time in his life when he needs to devel­op his quieter side. Not only is this a good idea in itself, but when it is time for him to cut loose again it'll come out even better. Randy and Marsha are nuns for the last three songs in the show. They're very entertaining and they do some­thing revue ought to do -0 introduce good new music. These songs come from a delightful small musical, "Nunsense." It's been out a few years. I caught it in Denver. But no-one's done it yet in Hous­ton. Houston audiences are good audi-ences and deserve this show! Sample these three songs and you'll begin to get a taste for it. Michael Bailey, the pianist, sings a lot more here than I remember him doing before. He has a rich, deep voice that one might not have expected from his slight fritzy, definitely with-it blond good looks. I'd like to hear more of him in the future. In fact, I'd really like it if this trio were to stay together and give us a new show every six months or so. NOTES: GAIL GERRARD and Phil Hooper, a locally based lounge act, are singing at a campaign party for George Bush in Charlotteshall, Md. to­day. The fundraiser is being coordinated by Van Halen's manager. Auditions: Tuesday Musical Club Chorus-a women's group which sings classical, spiritual and folk songs for various groups. Rehearsals Tuesdays. Child care provided at minimal fee. 464- 9874 or 521-2321. ... ART AGAINST AIDS: This is the first week of this month-long project. The following events are allied with it: Bright Eyes (MFA, 2 at 8PM)-a mov­ie presented by the Southwest Alternate Media Project (SWAMP). ONO! Only Human (MFA, 4 at 7PM)­SWAMP film. ONO! Kick-Off Luncheon (Menil Collection, 6 at 11:30PM)-ONO! Mike Le Febvre Trio (Radio Music Theater, 7 at 8PM)-jazz! ONO! As Is (Chocolate Bayou Theater Com­pany, 8-18)-produced by AIDS Foun­dation, Houston. Joe Morris (Hermann Hospital, Cro­zier Auditorium, 9 at noon)-stand- up comedian. ONO! OPENINGS: Labor Day Showcase­the Best of Fitz's New Music (Zelda's, 2 and 3). "True Colors" (Miller Outdoor, 2 and 3)-energetic American dance by the Delia Stewart Dance Company. Free­bies. Rob Weinstein, Texas City Davis, Doug Cooper (Comix Annex, 2 and 3). Poetry Readings (Firehouse on the Curve, 2 at 8:30PM). Preston Thompson (MFA, 4 at 2)-In­dian stories and music. ONO! Dante Garza, Cheryl Holliday, Mike Emody (Laff Stop, 6-11). As Is (Chocolate Bayou, 8)-an educa­tional effort by AIDS Foundation Hous­ton. There will be a moderated discussion after each performance of this taut drama about two lovers facing the death of one from the pandemic. Intrigue (Jonathon's, 8)-computer music. Health Officials Discuss 'Problems' A Cure Will Cause By Richard Luna United Press International FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE World Health Organization officials, claiming there is no single answer to the AIDS problem, said Monday the long­term benefits of a cure for the deadly disease are still unclear. Dr. Jonathan Mann, director of the Globar Program on AIDS for the World Health Organization, said when a cure for acquired immune deficiency syn­drome is found, it will cause even more problems for health officials all over the world. "We will be living with AIDS and its consequences for the rest of our lives," Mann said at the 13th annual World Conference of Health Education, being held this year in Houston. "If a (cure) drug is developed, it's not over," he said. "The critical point is there is no quick fix, something that will make this go away, and that's what everyone wants." Mann said the price of making the drug available would likely be expen­sive. "The world can't afford (experi­mental drug) AZT at the current price," he said. "Then there's the serious ques­tion of making sure it is available to the whole world and not just the rich." Mann said another concern health of­ficials will have to deal with is the "many people currently infected who don't know. Once a drug is available, many would try to find out (if they have the disease). Could the health system handle a large influx of additional peo­ple." He said existing health services are "stretched to the limit by existing de­mand." He said another area that must be studied is if a preventative drug is avail­able, would the general population take it as required? "When people get sick, they take drugs for a cure," he said. "But when people are healthy, it's difficult to get them to take drugs." Officials at the conference report the number of AIDS cases and countries re­porting the disease is continuing to in­crease. As of Aug. 1, more than 108,000 AIDS cases had been officially reported to the World Health Organization, which is based in Geneva. Nearly 70,000 of those cases are in the United States. Officials contend the number repre­sents only a portion of the total AIDS cases to date, which are estimated at as many as 250,000. WHO estimates that between 5 and 10 million people may currently be infected with human immu­nodeficiency virus, which causes AIDS. Mann said he is optimistic a drug to help stop the spread of AIDS will be available by the end of the century. "Education can be effective, also," he said. "AIDS has showed it can explode in all societies. There are ways to reach out to everyone." SEPTEMBER 2, 1988 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 day of shooting and just as obviously has a long, funny career ahead of him. Hilarious Australian Film Relieves Writer's Strike Boredom Director and writer Stephen MacLean's irreverent wit shows well in this one quote from the PR packet, "To me, nothing is like real but real life. A movie is a movie." By Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice A&E Editor FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE Have you noticed that there are no new Hollywood movies opening this week­end? Can it be that "Roger Rabbit" and friends are taking up all of the available screens? I doubt it. Can it just be the traditional slow weekend the first week­end in school? Well, maybe. But I think that it may be that the writer's strike is starting to hit home on the big screen. Actually, that might be a blessing in disguise. l'.m often telling you about all of these really very funny foreign films, but I'm often wondering if you're listen­ing. After all, why try something new? We haven't seen all of the great movies about people changing bodies with someone of a different age, yet. For mind deadening, which is what a lot of people want from their comedies, Hollywood is plenty inventive. But now, maybe you'll have to try a foreign comedy and find out that you're embarrassing yourself by laughing so hard out in public. Laugh right out loud?, I hear you smirking. At one of those horribly sensi­tive and subtle ... "Around the World in 80 Ways" is about as subtle as a Mel Brooks comedy. Big brother Wally is scrounging for money because the bank has repos­sessed "Wally's Big Banana," his tourist trap in Northern Australia. Little broth­er Eddie has fallen hard for Nurse Ophe­lia Cox. If you want subtle, you're in the wrong theater. Dad (Allan Penny) has lost his car dealership to his unscrupulous neigh­bor. Now it looks like he might loose his wife to him as well. She's stuck him in an old folk's home and run off on a trip around the world. Only after it's started does everyone realize that the neighbor is the only other single on the trip (ex­cept the tour guide). Dad insists on fol­lowing them. Maybe he can catch them in Hawaii. Except that he's psychosomatically blind and lame. And broke. Wait a min­im. It turns out he's got money stashed away . ... But it also turns out that he can't touch it for four weeks. By that time the errant spouse will be back. But if Wally does a favor for the old geezer in the meantime, maybe he can buy back his banana. And Ophelia Cox (Gosia Dobro­wolska) has a large number of ideas about how the old gentleman might be rehabilitated-basically that he's got a better chance if he actually tries to do something than if he vegetates and waits to die. So, the old gent is taken on a trip around the world, all right. You know how all Hilton's look alike? Well, they also look like the insides of the neigh­bor's tacky house. And about 15 of the people that they meet along the way look a lot like Wally (Philip Quast). The inside car lot becomes Las Vegas and the Vatican and the neighbor's collec­tion of sex toy dolls become the support­ing cast, at their best as a line of nuns. Wally is the black sheep of the family, not because he's gay (That's mentioned in passing several times.) but because he's so fiscally irresponsible. Quast is a treasure, a quieter version of Peter Sellers or Benny Hill (younger and handsomer, too) or a louder version Philip Quast as the gay big brother in "Around the World in 80 Ways." ~\ Nineteen year old Kelly Dingwall plays the younger brother, who wins the heart of Nurse Ophelia Cox (Gosia Dobrowolska). of Woody Allen. Or Tim Curry. Or just ny and yet so obviously well seasoned­himself, of course. It's wonderful to run an old pro we haven't seen too often all into someone so new in our eyes as Pen- ready. Kelly Dingwall turned 19 the first So learn, along with Dad, that the on­ly way to stay young is to take chances and try new things, no matter how silly they may seem. 3 1/2 out of 4. TRAILERS: EVERY Saturday af­ternoon in September, "Houston Grand Opera Presents" (KUHF) will feature an opera from Wagner's "Der Ring des Nibelungen" as performed at the 1988 Beyreuth Festival. This Sunday's "Das Rhinegold" begins at lPM The other three will begin at noon .... Channel 11 debuts a new one-hour talk show featuring Regis Philbin and Kathie Lee Gifford this Monday at 9AM. CELEBRATE! September 4th, 1972-Munich, Germany-Swimmer Mark Spitz won a record seventh gold medal in the 400 meter relay. B'days: 2-Cleveland Amory, Mark Harmon, Linda Purl. 3-Sarah Orne Jewett, Kitty Carlisle, Anne Jackson. 4-Craig Claiborne, Paul Harvey, Dick York. 5-William Devane, Bob Newhart, Jack Valenti. 6-Jane Addams, Mar­quis de Lafayette, Jo Anne Worley. 7- Valerie Taylor, Michael DeBakey, Anthony Quayle. 8-Sid Caesar, Patsy Cline, Peter Sellers. "An angel doesn't make love; an angel is love."-John Philip Law (born 9/ 7) as an angel fighting off the advances of the heroine, "Barbarella." DAILIES: Bright Eyes (MFA, 2)­Art Against AIDS. The Postman Always Rings Twice (1946 version); Slightly Scarlet (Rice, 2). I'm Allright, Jack; Two-Way Stretch (Rice, 3)-These begin an every other Friday series of early Peter Sellers mov­ies. His co-stars this week include Terry Thomas and Wilfrid Hyde-White. A Virus Knows No Morals (MFA, 3)­Art Against AIDS. La Dolce Vita (Rice, 4)-Fellini. Only Human (MFA, 4)-Art Against AIDS. Safer Sex Is Back Vogue "MALE MODELS WANTED": AIDS Foundation Houston Inc.-Education Department will be producing a safer sex poster. Interviews for models will be held through September 14, 1988. All proofs and photographs shots for this project will remain property of AIDS Foundation Houston Inc. Interested candidates should call 623-6796 Ext. no.48, Monday thru Friday from 9 a.m. till 6 p.m. Freddy Ready For Movie Robert Englund, the actor underneath all that fake scar tissue on the evil Fred­dy Krueger, says his latest movie, "Nightmare on Elm Street 4," is bring­ing out more fans. "They're always stopping me on the street to say, 'I'd love to be your next victim," Englund says. In addition to his new rap song with the Fat Boys and a television show brewing, Englund is branching out by directing a horror movie, "976-EVIL," that will open early next_year, 18 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 2, 1988 Bush's "Dirty Boys" In just a little over two months Americans will choose a new president. What key issues will decide that election-defense. child care, or some yet-to-be disclosed matter of substance? Not likely George Bush, the man who never was and long torn between his old handlers such as Jim Baker and the "new" boys headed by Lee Atwater, seems to have fallen in with the latter camp of right-wing activists. Atwater and his later cohorts such as Roger Stone, Paul Manafort and Charles Black (not exactly household names but neither were the names in Watergate or lrangate) really began this effort with the nomination of Barry Goldwater in 1964. Stone, at 19 in 1972, learned the ropes as part of Richard Nixon's dirty-trick operation. And we all should remember 1972-that was the year Nixon, who probably could have won re-election sitting on his hands, had to have a landslide, a mandate from the people. So he and his re-election committee, including the highest law-enforcement officer in the country-Attorney General John Mitchell-embarked on one of the most carefully planned, well financed corruptions of American politics. Even when the tip of the iceberg emerged with the abortive Watergate break-in. Nixon and his cohorts. using the full weight of the executive branch, covered up their wrongdoing until the electoral mandate was achieved. The "Dirty Boys" are back-"Dirty Boys, Part Ill." Atwater still pulls the strings. He planted the stories about Michael Dukakis' health (disclosed by columnists Novak and Evans, not known as liberals) and, in the true fashion of this type of political operative, put the blame on the LaRouche forces who had independently circulated the depression story. The extent of the Atwater network can be seen in Reagan's "off-the- cuff" comment-on the same day as the breaking of the story-referring to Dukakis as "that invalid." Then a little-known senator from Idaho, Steve Symns, announces that somewhere-nobody knows where­there are pictures of Kitty Dukakis burning the American flag in a '60s protest. And by a mere coincidence that same day, while addressing the VFW in Chicago, Bush makes reference to "flag burning." But Atwater and his "Dirty Boys" are only getfing warmed up. Unlike much of the electorate, they study history-they live it. And look what they found: In the 1920s and the 1950s Republicans successfully corralled votes with the "red scare," Commies everywhere after both great wars. But this needs some modern-day refinement-Dukakis is a "card-carrying member of the American Civil Liberties Union." (For those who missed this bit of history in school, Republican Senator Joe McCarthy went on a witch hunt in the 1950s for card-carrying Communists and homosexuals in the federal government­and his right arm was Roy Cohn, a recent victim of AIDS and a case history of the worse possible kind of closet case.) The ACLU-obviously a pinko front organization-actually represents right, left and center on any issue involving constitutional rights, a fact lost out on the huskings. Now the "Dirty Boys" work best behind the scenes, in fact, they prefer the dark and to shift responsibility elsewhere. But they do need that occasional lone voice in the media. So now comes Patrick Buchanan, one time hatchet man for Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan. When the news blitz surrounding Dan Quayle reaches its peak (fueled, interestingly enough, by the Quayle family paper and several other Republican bastions of the media) Buchanan emerges to proclaim a press conspiracy to discredit not only Dan Quayle but all patriotic Americans. And the Democrats are left standing by helplessly as what they saw as an issue against Bush (his first "presidential" decision to pick "Bland Dan") turn in his favor. (Footnote: In case the relevance of all this is eluding us, keep in mind that Buchanan squarely places the blame for the AIDS crisis on us "Sodomites." And we already know the anti-gay agenda of the rest of this right-wing hatchet squad.) ' . A brief note about the "Dirty Boys": This is the crew that eight years ago branded Bush a "pinko trilateralist" in New Hampshire. They learned negative advertising under Nixon and "plausible denialability" from Ed Meese. Charles Black started working with Senator Jesse Helms (these certain few names of gay-baiters do keep coming up) and worked for Senator Phil Gramm's election. While adhering to a clear conservative agenda, these "Dirty Boys" wage the campaign against Dukakis as one would fight a guerrilla war-from behind the bushes (really, no pun intended). The idea is to smear the candidate in such a manner that no matter how false the accusation, his credibility is damaged. It is this same mentality, and in some cases, the same personnel, that ran Nixon's campaign and the lrangate affair. (A new book by two senators, one of each party, on the lrangate committee conclude that the panel was outmanuvered and put on the defensive-but, of course, like Watergate the trials will not reveal the final truth until after the election. What does the rest of the campaign hold? Well, in a race in North Carolina handled by the "Dirty Boys" they brought up the Jewish question through a third part. and Kitty Dukakis is Jewish. And numerous times they have injected the homosexual question (paradoxically, the "Dirty Boys" have included the late Terry Dolen and Carl Channel - so that's what the term "Gay Republican" means) and in an interview Kitty Dukakis acknowledged that a couple of family members are gay. It's like watching coming attractions, or, in this case, future hatchet jobs. Leonard Frey, 49, who created the role of Harold the birthday boy in "Boys in the Band" off-Broadway and in the movie, died last week in New York of AIDS. Frey made his Broadway debut earlier in a small role in "Fiddler on the Roof" and later received an Oscar nomination as best supporting actor as Motel in the movie version. What, a sane voice from a churchman on "The Last Temptation of Christ"? In Larry King's column this week he quotes Rev. Billy Graham as saying, "I believe fu lly in the separation of church and state, and I totally believe in the First Amendment." He noted that he intended to see the movie since he couldn't understand how anyone could "prejudge anything." 1424-C Westheimer (at Windsor) 522-5156 Video Sales & Rentals • Swimwear • T -Shirts • Magazines • Cards • Books • Leather • Accessories • Necessities The largest selection of gay videos at the best prices in Houston, Lobo Video Club, with over a thousand gay titles, the largest in Texas. SEPTEMBER 2, 1988 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 ALSO NEW FEVER PITCH fromSeabag 20 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 2, 1988 Tallent On Woodhead: The Not So Antique Dealer PHOTO BY JEFF BRAY Dean Tallent: "This street really is turning into something. We work rogether here." By Jeff Bray The Montrose Voice The musty smell of pot pouri permeates the atmosphere as stuffed pheasants gaze almost languidly across the pol­ished antique lacquered table tops. Clocks tick, traffic sounds muffled from outside, and time seems to have stopped in an incredibly eclectic and eccentric drawing room. It looks like a setting for a macabre version of Salome. One could imagine Oscar Wilde sprawled on the lavish French Rococo furniture. Instead, one is confronted by the tall, handsome figure of Dean Tallent, who owns The Cottage on Woodhead and Two Doors Down­two flourishing antique shops on the 2000 block of Woodhead. "We had a 1965 Rolls Royce Silver Cloud here yesterday on consignment," says the 40 year old blonde moustached Tallent. "It was priced at $36,000, and we actu­ally have a couple people interested. Of course, that's really unusual here. We tend to have more affordable merchan­dise, but that's the fun of this place. You never know what's going to come through." The idea of consignment is new to many people who may occasionally wander through Houston's many an­tique shops. People sometimes grow tired of old items in their homes, and they'll take them to a man like Dean Tallent, who will look it over and decide whether or not to display them in his store. Often, if he does not wish to dis­play them there, he will refer them to another store where he feels the mer­chandise will be more properly dis­played. It's a profitable occupation for those who have the taste and the knowledge to chose the right items and display them in the right environment. That knowl­edge and taste are evidently well repre­sented in Tallent, who's Cottage was recently displayed in an article by Texas Monthly Magazine. "I've had the Cottage for about two years," he explains, as he relaxes in a gorgeous faux malachite chair. "I'm a native Houstonian. I got my Masters at Stephen F. Austin, then taught art in Florida for about ten years before I came back. I've always considered myself to be a Texas boy, and I feel more comforta­ble here." When he came back to Houston from Florida, Tallent busied himself by work­ing for designers in the city, painting and decorating. Eventually, he devel­oped a skill for faux finishes-a form of art he still prefers, and which is current­ly enjoying a great popularity in the world of architecture and design. As he worked, he picked up contacts and skill along the way. After sitting in many other galleries and shops for other own­ers, he finally decided to take a chance and start his own shop. "The things from New Guinea at the Cottage are real things. They only stopped head hunting over there in the last 20 years or so. They're probably still doing it in some places. The designs on those war shields aren't just decora­tions. They're magic for those people. They mean something! "We get tables where I look at them and wonder what sort of transactions took place on them in the centuries they've been around. It's pretty interest­ing." Perhaps the most beguiling of all Tal­lent's objects is the $4,600 French Ro­mantic bed that once belonged to Elizabeth Taylor. Surely one must won­der what that bed has seen in its day. "The people who owned it had had it for about 15 years, so I guess Liz slept in it around 1970." Who was Liz with in 1970? Interest­ingly enough, the bed requires special linens because it is a king size length and a queen size width. Speculation runs rampant. For Tallent, oddities of merchandise aside, business has been quite good since he first opened up two years ago. The Woodhead location is turning into a small antique district, and the prospects seem exciting. "This street is really turning into something," he says, pleased. "We all work together and refer people to each other. I think it'll be the up and coming thing. We plan to expand our hours be­cause customers complain that they can't come here after work on weekdays. We'll probably stay open late on Thurs­days soon. "The nice thing is that we help each other. The new guy down the street is going to contribute a lot to the neighborhood. He's accepted. I think competition is good. There are 10 shops here within a two block radius. If you don't find it in this shop, you may find it in one of the others. It works for all of us." Because of the increased traffic, Tal­lent has just recently opened his new shop. It is named Two Doors Down be­cause it is literally two doors down and across the street from The Cottage on Woodhead. Two Doors Down is more up scale than The Cottage, which will soon specialize in Christmas items and con­tain more eclectic material. "September is a good time to start pre­paring for Christmas," Tallent says, smiling. "I've always loved Christmas, so that's why I'm starting early. I make wreathes and garland myself, and I need a head start." He points to the gorgeous garland that drapes over the fireplace in his new shop. It consists of thousands of dried flowers, bows, ribbons, plants, feathers and even swag tie-backs. Because it is dried, it can last years if taken care of properly, and he is justly pleased with his work. ,,, forces you otherwise wouldn't have to use." While working for others, however, Tallent never really dreamed of his own shop. He just decided to do it, and it worked. "You don't really think of it until you do it," he explains. "Now I know what's good and what isn't. Faux finishes are really hot right now. I like to paint, but I don't find the time anymore. I also have a man who comes here and can carve anything broken or gone and make it look perfect." Tallent shows off an ancient French country table with rather delicate curved legs. One entire leg had been missing, and a large chip had been gouged out of the side. His craftsman had so perfectly replaced these parts with matching wood and grain that it was impossible to detect where the dam­age had occurred. "This table has been around for over a hundred years," Tallent says, smiling proudly. "Now it's good for another hun­dred or more." Tallent tries to be as versatile as possi­ble. His oldest piece is an ancient 2,000 year old Mezzo American Cholema dog made of terra cotta. It snarls in primi­tive eternal anger right next to a modern stone sculpture by Hayes Parker. He PHOTO BY JEFF BRAY Tallent displays his wares outside his original Cottage on Woodhead, across the street from Two Doors Down. "I guess Christmas is the boy in me," he says shyly. "It's one of those things you don't get over." Does the shop owner ever tire of his antiques, since he's surrounded by them all day every day? "Because I see things first, I get first choice," he says. "My house has lots of nice antique things. I love them. My house has the same feel about it. I see the craftsmanship and I respect it. Besides, these shops are a little bit of escape. You step off the streets of Houston and into a Victorian drawing room." When faced with the late summer beat and the blinding subtropical light, a Victorian drawing room can sometimes be a welcome respite. The thick curtains, the rich fabrics, the eccentric shapes, the luxurious textures all draw prospec­tive escapees into the shops to explore and wonder. The beauty is overlaid by the seductive scent of pot pouri, but Tal­lent laughs and tells us not to be too drawn into the fantasy. "Half the time, pot pouri is there to cover the smell of Grandma's rugs." "I started my shop when the economy was pretty bad," he says. "I never really experienced the good old days, and I think that was actually good for me in the long run. I never knew what it was like to have it real easy, so I did well in a very difficult environment. It made me try harder. It makes you play a few more likes to mix these items because of their general texture, not necessarily because of their age. "You kind of start by being a shopper and buyer," he explains, as he walks among his beautifully equipped rooms. "I love English, but as you can see, I have French and American from differ­ent periods. Since I do upper consign­ments, I don't have complete control. I do chose things from what is brought to me. We're not really here to store things as much as we're here to sell them. "A good third of all our business is from designers and decorators," he con­tinues. "It takes a lot of time to shop around for items for clients, and a shop. like this really saves time. We have many of the little things they need." He shows off a beautiful piece of jewel­ry inside a glass frame. It is called a Kootchie from Afghanistan. "This is where the term 'Kootchie­Kootchie' comes from," he says, grin­ning. "I'm serious!" In a store full of unusual items, there has to be a certain amount of eccentrici­ty involved. "It's what I really enjoy about my work," he explains. "everything has a story to it. All these things have stories, and I love hearing their history from the people who bring them in to me. It should make me an interesting old man one of these days." He laughs at himself, fully knowing that. he 1-\as a long way 4> go. 'No Condom, No Sex' Makes Safe Sex Information Rock Producer Randy Morrison (left) and songwriter Stewart Pfalzer take five during the recording sessions for the Sire/ Warner Brothers 12" maxi-single. By Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice A&E Editor FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE "You have the weapons within reach. Take time and learn to use them." Which weapons? It's all right there in the song's title, "No Condom, No Sex." Thousands of young people who ought to know better are not using this approach to safer sex. Why aren't they? So far condoms have been sold as be­ing good for you. How many young stu­dents eat cereal that is good for them?Phooey. We have to make these thins stylish. We need to convince each other to use them for their own sake-a national fetish. As the producer of the record, Randy Morrison, put it, "I think this song makes the option of safer sex seem more erotic, and that's the best approach. The song is in no way depressing or fearful." Billboard calls it "a danceable groove and a host of workable mixes" and says it exhibits "a spacious European feel." They feels it has great chart potential. I know it's going to be a hit locally. My copy was stolen from my mailbox at the paper, as near as I can tell, before I ever got my hands on it. What better recom­mendation can I receive? Gary Weiss, who was nominated for an MTV music video directing award this year, recently directed a host of stars in the video version. The roster includes Katherine Oxenberg, Randy Quaid, Paul Sand, Richard Lewis, Buck Henry, Julie Brown, Toni Basil and members of the group Fishbone. The song, written by Stewart Pfalzer and performed by Cruise Control, was picked up by the Sire Records label. It was executive produced by Craig Kos­tich, Vice President of Contemporary Music at Warner Brothers. As Morrison wrote to me, "I believe this is the first time a major record label has been willing to release a record writ­ten, performed and produced by gays and one that is of special interest to and will directly benefit the gay communi­ty." In addition to money raised from the video, 100 percent of the artists and pro­ducers profits from the sale of the record will go to AIDS education. To quote the song again (I did get a written copy of the lyrics), "Just remem­ber this is not 1981 ... " Gumbel Grumbles Don't look for Cher or Garrison Keillor to appear on NBC's "Today" show any­time soon. Co-host Bryant Gumbel, in an interview published in the Sept. 5 issue of Us magazine, mentions Keillor as being foremost among the "real jerks" he's had to interview. "I feel sorry for him because he has such a glorified opinion of himself," Gumbel says. Nor is he a Cher fan. "I prefer people less enamored of themselves," he says. "I have an aversion to professional celebrities who appear on the cover of People (magazine) every six months and who run and do every little cheap gym ad." Gumbel also knocks Joan Collins, James Earl Jones and David Letter­man, with whom he's had a running feud ever since Letterman used a bull­horn to disrupt a "Today" prime-time special. Gumbel used a seven-letter profanity to characterize Letterman and said he knew plenty of people who had similar assessments after appearing on the Let­terman show .. SEPTEMBER 2, 1988 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 Community News from Neighborhood & Community Groups .. AIDS In Texas Symposium To Be Held Oct. 22-23 AIDS cases in Texas are increasing, and health care providers who must help fight the deadly epidemic are looking for updated information on diagnosis and treatment proce­dures. A two-day symposium on "AIDS in Texas" may provide new insight. The seminar, scheduled Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 22-23, is sponsored by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston's Division of Continuing Education and Medical School in cooperation with the Texas Academy of Family Physicians. It will be at the Westin Oaks Hotel in Houston, 5011 Westheimer. Advance registration is advised. For more information on registration fees contact Beverly Osterloh, (713) 792-4671 . .. Mayors Award $607,000 For AIDS Education Targeting Racial And Ethnic Minorities The United States Conference of Mayors announced at the National Conference on the Prevention of HIV Infection and AIDS Among Racial and Ethnic Minorities the awarding of 15 grants to community based organizations to conduct AIDS education/ information programs targeting racial and ethnic minority communities. Funding totaling $607,000was awarded to organizations in 14 cities in 11 states. Between January 1981 and August 1988, over 70,000 persons have been diagnosed with AIDS; a disproportionate number of these persons are black and Hispanic. With the awarding of this $607,000, the Conference of Mayors has madeover65 grants to communi­ty based organizations since 1985. Funding for this effort has now surpassed the $1.6 million level. Projects in the following cities were funded: Atlanta; Cambridge; Detroit; Evanston; Las Cruces; Los Angeles; New Haven; New York (2); Providence; Richmond; Sacramento; San Diego: Washington, DC; and West Holly­wood, CA. The Conference of Mayors also announced the availability of its Round 7 Request for Proposals (RFP). Proposals for projects targeting racial and ethnic minorities. including blacks and Hispanic, gays and bisexuals, intravenous drug users. and other persons at high risk of contracting HIV will be funded in amounts ranging from $20,000 to $42,000 each year . .. "HOT, FAT, AND SASSY" To Benefit The Gay Fathers Of Houston There is a wonderful new production now showing at "The Comedy Workshop''. It stars Randy Jobe, Marsha Carlton and Michael Bailey. The name of the production is "HOT, FAT, AND SASSY". Thanks to the generosity of the players and "The Comedy Workshop" the September 4th presentation has been set aside as a fund raiser for Gay Fathers of Houston. If you can't attend that Sunday night performance the tickets could be used at any of the following performances that week. Jim Pate, President of Gay Fathers, has explained that the monies that are raised will be the start of the "Seed Money" needed to bring the 1991 conference of Gay and Lesbian Parents Coalition International to Houston. It is expected the conference will bring 350 to 450 people to Houston from all over the U.S. The GLPCI is an international organization of Gay Men and Lesbian Women who find themselves in child nurturing roles. The Coalition lobbies for equal rights for Gay and Lesbians fighting for parental rights. The Coalition has had representatives on the Donahue Show, and many other local talk shows around the nation, discussing the problems associated with being Gay/ Lesbian and a parent. Gay Fathers will have an information and ticket sales booth at Grant and Pacific the weekend of September 2. Stop by when you are in the area and learn more about Gay Fathers, GLPCI, and buy a ticket or two for the comedy production. His Fingers Did The Walking To Vice Squad By Michael Moline FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (UPI}-A man who solicited sexual encounters with other men by dialing telephone numbers at random made one call too many and was arrested after making a date with a sheriffs deputy, officials said Wednes­day. "Yeah, it was great," said Dick Simp­son, spokesman for the Leon County Sheriffs Department. "I can't think of this ever happening before." Robert S. Crough, 37, was arrested Tuesday and charged with solicitation for prostitution and making obscene phone calls, Simpson said. Simpson said Crough called numbers at random and struck up conversations with men who answered the phone. The number he called Monday was the pri­vate line of the sheriffs Special Investi­gations office. "He gets you fairly comfortable first," Simpson said of Crough's approach. "Sometimes he asks for somebody who's not there and he starts a conversation with you. If the other guy feels comforta­ble with him, he takes it from there. "He tells you what he could do for you and what you could do for him. The phone call got pretty explicit at his end of it," Simpson said. The suspect and the deputy agreed on a $60 fee and arranged to meet Tuesday . afternoon at the pool at Crough's apart­ment, Simpson said. They met and Crough suggested they go to his apartment. A short time later, detectives moved in to make the arrest. Although Simpson told Crough he was not a cop, Simpson doubted Crough could plead entrapment. "He called us. We didn't call him," Simpson said. 22 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 2, 1988 David Scondras: Is He Prophet Or Just A Dreamer? By Rex Wockner FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE Openly-gay Boston city councilor David Scondras is no ordinary interview sub­ject. Whatever the opposite of "pulling teeth" is, that's how the interview feels. Each question gets his full attention, and a 15-minute, seriously considered response. Critics have suggested Scondras sometimes gets lost in the clouds. Maybe it just seems that way because most of our politicians are overly down-to-earth. Scondras is a bit of a philosopher, but not in a way that's going to go over any­one's head. Unlike most of the 26 openly gay/ les­bian elected officials in the U.S., Scon­dras has carved out for himself a national reputation. As much as any· thing, it is the tone and style of his pub­lic remarks that have got him noticed. Rex Wockner: Most openly gay local politicians don't have the national name recognition that you do. What got you there? David Scondras: I think everyone has different styles, and events lead them in different directions. From the begin­ning- long before gay and lesbian is· sues surfaced in my life-there were issues around arson that got me on na­tional TV. I think, though, that you can't be a good local leader in the long-run unless you are working on a state and national level too. So, I don't just deal with find­ing an elderly person a place to live. I also go to Washington to pressure the federal government for an adequate sup­ply of housing for the elderly. You have to go to Washington and tell people there that they are misspending your constit­uents' tax dollars. It also seemed natural for me to go to Washington and work on AIDS fund­ing, and natural for me to get arrested at the White House-not only because of my outrage at the insensitivity towards human beings and their needs, but also at the pissing away of our very hard­earned tax dollars in such irrational ways. People don't realize how little life is divisible into local, state, federal and in­ternational. Life is one thing and I would fell remiss if I didn't take the time-besides working on local issues­to say to the federal government that it is causing my constituents to suffer. I have a philosophy of government that when they're using my money, they can't tell me to mind my own business. Now, In many ways, the gay and les­bian community has within it all the elements of the dream of America- the idea of a place where people who are very different see each other as a family who are willing to fight for each other and willing to say that life is a celebra­tion and willing to remove the obstacles to enjoying this extraordinary place and this extraordinary thing called being alive. The gay community is male and fe­male, Black and white, Hispanic, Jew­ish, bisexual; it has an extraordinary diversity. It's the only community that contains within it every other communi­ty and every other community's issues. We have the potential of dealing with issues like racism and sexism in an ef­fective way because we have to. If we're anti-Semitic, we lose our Jewish constit­uents. If we're racist, we lose people of color. So, the gay
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