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Houston Voice, No. 1172, April 11, 2003
File 013
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Houston Voice, No. 1172, April 11, 2003 - File 013. 2003-04-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/811/show/794.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2003-04-11). Houston Voice, No. 1172, April 11, 2003 - File 013. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/811/show/794

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1172, April 11, 2003 - File 013, 2003-04-11, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/811/show/794.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1172, April 11, 2003
Contributor
  • Weaver, Penny
  • Crain, Chris
Publisher Window Media
Date April 11, 2003
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 013
Transcript t- liMIHHil voice STAFF EDITORIAL & PRODUCTION Executive Editor CHRIS CRAIN Editor PENNY WEAVER editora tioustonvoicecom Produdicai BONNIE NAUGLE, JOEY CAROLINO (^responderte LOU CHIBBARO JR., LAURA DOUGLAS-BROWN, MIKE FLEMING, MATTHEW HENNIE. BRIAN MOYLAN. KEVIN NAFF. JENNIFER SMITH, RHONDA SMITH, STEVE WEINSTEIN Contrtutors DON MOSER, JOE PHILLIPS F-hotogrstphers DALTON DEHART, KIMBERLY THOMPSON Wabmaster JED DEMPSEY SALES & ADMINISTRATION General Manager DANIEL EMERICH demerich(a'htHistonvoice.com Account Executives BRETT CULLUM - lKullumihaistonvoice.com DONNA HULL - dhullahoustonvoicenom BRIAN MARTIN - bmartina'ioustonvoice.com National Advertising Representative Rlvendell Marketing Company, Inc 212-242-6863 "owMediaPur Publisher-WINDOW MEDIA LLC Preadent- WILLIAM WAYBOURN Editorial Director-CHRIS CRAIN Corporate Controller- BARNETTE HOLSTON Art Director- ROB BOEGER General Manager- MICHAEL KITCHENS Marketing Manager- DAN GARRIOTT m tt>echamber CHARTER MEMBER Established 1974 as the Montrose Star. 500 Lovett Bhfd, Suite 200 Houston, Texas 77006 (713) 529-8490 Fax: (70)529-9531 www.houstofrvoice.com Contents copyright 2003 Office hours: 9 a.m. to 530 p.m. weekdays To submit a letter Letters should be fewer than 400 words. We reserve the right to edit for content and length. We will withhold names upon request, but you must include your name and phone number for verification. Please send mail to Houston Voice. 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200. Houston, Texas 77006; fax (TB) 529-9531 or e-mail to editordtiouston- voice.com. Opinions expressed therein do not reflect those of the Houston Voice. Al material In Houston Voice is protected by federal -uoyr-ght law and may not be reproduced without the written consent of Houston Voice. The sexual c-n-wttatnn of advertisers. prtf^acriers. writers and cartoonists puUnhti herein is neither inferred or implied The appearance of names or p-ctorwl representation does not necessarily indicate the sexual orientation of that person or persons Houston Vote accepts unsolicited editorial material but cannot take responsibility lor its return The editor reserves the right to accept, reted or edit any -wfcriisuon AH rights revert to authors upon publication. Gufclines lor freelance contributors are available upon request Forum HOUSTON VOICE APRIL 11. 2003 PAGE 12 guest editorial A new war, a new me Eleven years ago, when bombs fell on Baghdad, I was singing the national anthem in support. This time around, coming out has changed my view. Issue 1172 By MILES CHRISTIAN DANIELS WAS ON MY WAY HOME from 7-Eleven when a song was interrupted with news that America was bombing Iraq. A nervous reporter gave play-byplay commentary. Bombs and bullets exploded in the background. I had just turned 14 and remember the sense of pride I felt that night. In somewhat silly fashion, I joined a few of my friends in placing our right hands over our hearts and singing together. "Oh. say can you see by the dawn's early light what so proudly we hailed?" I was still in the closet in 1991. And I would stay that way for nine more years, both in terms of my sexual orientation and the way I thought things were supposed to be. But a few details from Operation Desert Storm are still fresh. Peter Arnett and Bernard Shaw became household names. That ghostly green night-vision camera, which brought the bombing into our living rooms, still occasionally emerges in my dreams. And I fondly remember Mom hanging the American flag on our front porch post and tying a yellow ribbon around the rusted anchor in our front yard. That war lasted less than two months, and Bush Sr. declared victory. Years later I would learn we didn't even come close to winning, and that hopeful Iraqi citizens, who had welcomed our troops with song and dance, were later slaughtered as they tried to finish what we had started. I also learned that all we did to help was toss stale bread from a moving aircraft. THOUGH WANCHESE, OUR SMALL fishing village in coastal North Carolina, had sent no troops, the community rallied behind George Bush Sr, much like it's doing today with his son. And I stood behind them — not only on the issue of war, but on other moral issues. I believed abortion was murder, with no exceptions. I believed that gays went to Hell, even though I battled those "demons" myself. I believed Bush Sr. was seated next to the Father's right hand and that listening to liberals would poison my thoughts and hinder my walk with God. I guess, in a way, being gay has been good for me. And being gay and from Wanchese even belter. Though I'm still loved by many there, even more consider me a depraved sinner and an embarrassment. Even in high school and early college, I held onto my beliefs. I wrote a newspaper column for the Virginian-Pilot in Norfolk about how wonderful Newt Gingrich's "Contract with America" would one day be for my generation. I became a licensed minister in my denomination, and served for a year-and- a-half as a full-time youth minister. Life was on-track and Wanchesers, as they're known, couldn't have been more proud. Until I came out. AT FIRST, I WONDERED IF MY MORAL metamorphism was a sort of inner revolt — a way of coping with the fact I was now deemed a sinner — an immoral enemy — in the eyes of those I had loved and grown up with. 1 started writing newspaper columns about gay issues and accepting and loving all people regardless of their differences. The beliefs I once held so dear had seemingly deteriorated. A few nights before our current president announced our invasion of Iraq, I stood in downtown Wilmington, N.C., holding a lit candle poked through a paper cup holder. Crowded around were a couple hundred people who — like me — did not think we were doing the right thing. There were Catholics from the downtown parish, activists from the Green and Democratic parties, a handful of local college professors and students, and a healthy representation of gay men and lesbians. We silently prayed for peace and then we went home. Though I tried to conjure up the emotions I had felt during the first Persian Gulf War, they just weren't there. In fact, at that moment, I would have been lucky to stumble through that first line of the "Star Spangled Banner." And, in addition to my prayer for our brave troops, I added a few others to the list, like those Iraqis whose lives would be lost in the line of erroneous bombs and bullets — those civilians who had asked for none of this. I even offered a prayer for Saddam Hussein. After all. I was taught that Christ came for the most grave of sinners. While standing silently at that vigil, I also thought about how my life has changed in these brief years since America's first war in Iraq. How only a few years ago, I would have been on the other side of the street waving our flag, holding high my sign proclaiming Hussein a devil, and shouting at those who were not being patriotic. I guess, in a way, being gay has been good for me. And being gay and from Wanchese even better. Though I'm still loved by many there, even more consider me a depraved sinner and an embarrassment. So, I've had to learn the hard way what it's like to be thrust on the other side of enemy lines. And I've felt the pain of those who are hated, spit upon and — for some — even murdered for simply being who they are. Miles Christian il Daniels is a freelance writer and documentary filmmaker in Wilmington, N.C. He can be reached at mcd5024(a)uncwiledu.
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