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Montrose Voice, No. 337, April 10, 1987
File 017
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Montrose Voice, No. 337, April 10, 1987 - File 017. 1987-04-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7879/show/7866.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-04-10). Montrose Voice, No. 337, April 10, 1987 - File 017. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7879/show/7866

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 337, April 10, 1987 - File 017, 1987-04-10, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7879/show/7866.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 337, April 10, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date April 10, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 017
Transcript 16 MONTROSE VOICE/APRIL 10, 1987 Americans Make a Deal With an Apology Commentary by Anne Saker WASHINGTON (UPI)—Americans find apology the most difficult of communication because making excuses is the second most important feature of capitalism and forgiveness is not an American trait. In business, in politics, even in religion—as the current jihad among televangelists demonstrates — apologies become currency, barter for a better deal: I'll say I'm sorry if you promise 1) not to sue; 2) to vote for me; 3) to keep sending those love offerings. The nation has been enured to the deal-making and because apologies are so expensive, Americans usually will forgo them because they don't want to pay the price, even for the satisfaction of hearing somebody say, "I'm sorry." The Pilgrims, full of divine fire, landed on the New World's rocky shores utterly certain of their Providential deed of trust. Such absolute purpose was born from the belief that Old World was warring, oppressive and bloody because it was constantly apologizing to heaven for its morass of human frailty and suffering. The American nation, however, was founded on the tenet that believers could have a wholly correct and unerring contract with God—a belief that has not changed radically in tenor since William Bradford wrote to his spiritual cousins in Europe that deliverance was available very nearly as simply as arriving in the New World. Apologies were unnecessary when godly people were carving out a city on a hill from a untractable wilderness. That article of faith got the Pilgrims through hellish winters, and though by time alone made slightly more complex, that belief rules American life now. A magazine cover story recently wailed at the decline and fall of can-do American service. A cheery smile or a cordial offer of help costs extra as service submits to the service industry. A plane is a hour late for takeoff because a rear door cannot be closed. No one says, "Sorry for the delay, folks." Instead, the pilot blames FAA regulations, which apparently require that all airplane doors be closed while in flight. Politically, apologies force reassessment of motivations and goals, something to be fervently avoided. Those who wait, candle in window, to hear from Nixon or Reagan in this regard keep a lonely vigil. As a signal demonstration of American political weakness, an apology is tops. Say anything else communism had to be stopped, future presidents needed protection, mistakes were made but for an American politician, apologies are anathema. The squabbling among the television preachers offers the most intriguing current study of apologies. The Rev. Jim Bakker's confession of infidelity seemed at first a bracing display of humility from a person who makes a fine living telling people to make right with God. Only a few days passed before his act of contrition took on the unappealing taint, in the current argot, ofthe "poison pill"—an action to fend off a hostile takeover. To extend the metaphor, the Rev. Jerry Falwell rode in as Bakker's "white knight" to save the PTL Club, adding a delicious little twist for those who have watched Falwell's career with perverse fascination. In America, apologies are a means to a foreseeable and attainable end, as much of the fabric of commerce and politics as money. Forgiveness, as a result, is drawn into the exchange as a matter of trade. Simply saying "I'm sorry" with no strings attached is a singular act of humanity, a gift from one spirit to another and, apparently, becoming rarer by the day. The Best Little Guest House in Town ANS Reasonable Nightly & Weekly Rates Private Baths Free Parking For Reservations Call (504) 566-1177 1118 Ursulines, New Orleans, LA 70116 ( —. STERLING Paint and Body Centers 1107-D Upland Dr. Just N.W. ol Katy Frwy _ Wilcresl From Minor Dents to Major Restorations Financing Available 932-9401 Open 24 Hours Phone for Appts. between 9am-6pm •It Uj0|^«w Pharmacy ^fam Prescription Savings Card SJt~ I {J ■ ^M On Your P ■ ^mW Needs At Prescription -- The stores Listed on The Back T§n^g^__FS-ns-s 3tiorilpr«rri_rinnl-,_,, ' ...I. Af"' I A"Y I .-. I I°re5cri0tionlpr«cno 'Off! Off xt*** A / At^i A <m> .,_* • 4 EXPRESS LANES DAILY 'MONTROSE KROGER STORE introducing... The Kroger Pharmacy Prescription savings Card Bring your prescription Savings Card to the Kroger Pharmacy each time you have a prescription filled and save: ••3.00 off the 1st and 11th prescription filled and •'1.00 off on all the prescriptions filled in between •*15 Total Savings 'mUNIKU_ KKWEK _l_ KE DETAILS IN STORE
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