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Montrose Voice, No. 337, April 10, 1987
File 003
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Montrose Voice, No. 337, April 10, 1987 - File 003. 1987-04-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 7, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7879/show/7852.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-04-10). Montrose Voice, No. 337, April 10, 1987 - File 003. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7879/show/7852

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 337, April 10, 1987 - File 003, 1987-04-10, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 7, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7879/show/7852.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 337, April 10, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date April 10, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript 2 MONTROSE VOICE/APRIL 10, 1987 Scientists Report AIDS Vaccine Progress By Jan Ziegler UPI Science Writer WASHINGTON—Preliminary tests in baboons show a novel experimental AIDS vaccine keeps the virus from attaching to immune system cells and may prevent infection, Texas researchers say. The approach is based on a complex process that uses antibodies- substances manufactured by the body to fight foreign agents such as bacteria and viruses—instead of a fragment of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome virus. Most other experimental vaccines are based on AIDS virus fragments. The next step is to determine if the vaccine candidate prevents AIDS virus infection in chimpanzees, said Tran Chanh, an associate scientist at the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research. "There have been suggestions we bypass the chimp and use humans for vaccine trials now," the Vietnamese- born immunologist said in a telephone interview April 3. "I don't know if it will ever go that way." Chanh said it is uncertain whether the compound will work as well in chimps or in humans. The chimp tests are expected to take a couple of years. Chanh's team reported the results at the annual meeting ofthe Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology earlier this month. Another researcher, clinical biologist Ami Klein from the Sunnybrook Medical Centre in Toronto, said she and colleagues have isolated a substance from the blood of AIDS patients and patients with AIDS-related complex that kills white blood cells. Klein said the substance, which does not appear to be produced by the virus, was not found in the blood of healthy people. Chanh's team made antibodies that mimic the receptor site on white blood cells attacked by the AIDS virus. The virus attaches to the antibodies instead ofthe cells, and thus no infection occurs. The team first injected mice with molecules from the section on the virus that hooks onto immune system cells. In response, the mice made antibodies that were then injected into another group of Bill Proposes AIDS Courses in Okla. Schools OKLAHOMA CITY (UPI)—Courses on AIDS would be taught in public schools in Oklahoma under a bill approved Monday by a state Senate committee. The bill would require courses on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome be taught once in grades 5 and 6, once in grades 7 through 9 and once in grades 10 through 12. An amendment to the bill that has been approved by the state House would require students be told that sexual contact with a person with AIDS will permanently disqualify them from donating blood. Other amendments would require that students be told that total abstinence from sexual activity is the only way to be sure of avoiding the disease and would bar the advocation or promotion of contraceptives as a prevention for the disease. animals. Those animals made antibodies to the first set of antibodies. This second set of antibodies closely resembled the original target molecules, so when baboons were injected with them they produced antibodies that blocked the molecules' action when mixed with virus in lab dishes. The antibodies produced in the baboons with a variety of AIDS virus strains clogged the virus' molecular binding hooks on as much as 99 percent of the virus, Chanh said. About 1 percent appeared unaffected by the antibodies. Leo Rodkey, an associate professor at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston, whose 1974 theory is the foundaton of the San Antonio team's research work, termed the report "very exciting." "I think they are on the right track," Rodkey said. "They have some very good ideas that deserve further testing." We're Houston's Largest Gay Audience. We're the readers of the Montrose Voice. We're the people you reach when you advertise in the Montrose Voice. We're about 27,000 readers weekly. (There's still another 26,870 of us not pictured above.) You know what else? We, the readers of the Voice, spend somewhere around $6,000,000 weekly on the things we buy—clothes, partying at night, apartments, cars and repair, hair care, serious things and silly things. (Yes, that's $6 million weekly.) Got something to sell next week? We've got the money to buy it. Maybe all you have to do is ask—by advertising to us through our newspaper. The Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE DIAL 529-8490 for ADVERTISING or HOME DELIVERY dw wc 1-gurerJ the tigures Bns« distnou"0' temporarily suspended) Assumed 'pass ' p approx 27 000 (5% allowed for returns) If** eek (on everything in hfe} (hen we collective REFLECTED THE TUESOAY EDITION 1 10000 copies Friday (5000 copies " fate tactor 2 8 Thus estimated assume the average among us spends spend S5.985.OO0 weekly
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