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Montrose Voice, No. 337, April 10, 1987
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Montrose Voice, No. 337, April 10, 1987 - File 001. 1987-04-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7879/show/7850.

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(1987-04-10). Montrose Voice, No. 337, April 10, 1987 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7879/show/7850

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 337, April 10, 1987 - File 001, 1987-04-10, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7879/show/7850.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 337, April 10, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date April 10, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript montrose Rail Transit Line Would Traverse Montrose News, inside HOUSTON WEEKEND WEATHER: Fair and cool at ~f ,fj ~ ~ ;i ~~I 1] APRIL 10 . 1987 ISSUE 337 I~ j) ~ 3 ~~~ht, low near 55. Warm and sunny days, high near Gay Candidates Lose in Dallas and SF Returns, inside 'Grandpa Hasn't Moved' at Radio Music Theater A Comedy Worth Your .Time Bill O'Rourke, inside Church Group Reaches Decision on Bakker News, inside Critics Unimpressed with Reagan's AIDS Gambit Commentary, inside INSIDE: THE BEST COMIC PAGE IN AMERICA 2 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 10, 1987 Scientists Report AIDS Vaccine Progress By Jan Ziegler UPI Science Writer WASHINGTON- Preliminary tests in baboons show a novel experimental AIDS vaccine keeps the virus from att­aching to immune system cells and may prevent infection, Texas researchers say. The approach is based on a complex process that uses antibodies­substances manufactured by the body to fight foreign agents such as bacteria and viruses-instead of a fragment of the acquired immune deficiency syn­drome virus. Most other experimental vaccines are based on AIDS virus frag­ments. The next step is to determine if the vaccine candidate prevents AIDS virus infection in chimpanzees, said Tran Chanh, an associate scientist at the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research. "There have been suggestions we bypass the chimp and use humans for vaccine trials now," the Vietnamese­born immunologist said in a telephone interview April 3. "I don't know if it will ever go that way." Chanh said it is uncertain whether the compound will work as well in chimps or in humans. The chimp tests are expected to take a couple of years. Chanh's team reported the results at the annual meeting of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology earlier this month. Another researcher, clinical biologist Ami Klein from the Sunnybrook Medi­cal Centre in Toronto, said she and col­leagues have isolated a substance from the blood of AIDS patients and patients with AIDS-related complex that kills white blood cells. Klein said the substance, which does not appear to be produced by the virus, was not found in the blood of healthy people. Chanh's team made antibodies that mimic the receptor site on white blood cells attacked by the AIDS virus. The virus attaches to the antibodies instead of the cells, and thus no infection occurs. The team first injected mice with molecules from the section on the virus that hooks onto immune system cells. In response, the mice made antibodies that were then injected into another group of Bill Proposes AIDS Courses in Okla. Schools OKLAHOMA CITY (UPl)-Courses on AIDS would be taught in public schools in Oklahoma under a bill approved Monday by a state Senate committee. The bill would require courses on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syn­drome be taught once in grades 5 and 6, once in grades 7 through 9 and once in grades 10 through 12. An amendment to the bill that has been approved by the state House would require students be told that sexual con­tact with a person with AIDS will per­manently disqualify them from donating blood. Other amendments would require that students be told that total absti­nence from sexual activity is the only way to be sure of avoiding the disease and would bar the advocation or promo­tion of contraceptives as a prevention for the disease animals. Those animals made antibo­dies to the first set of antibodies. This second set of antibodies closely resembled the original target molecules, so when baboons were injected with them they produced antibodies that blocked the molecules' action when mixed with virus in lab dishes. The antibodies produced in the baboons with a variety of AIDS virus strains clogged the virus' molecular binding hooks on as much as 99 percent of the virus, Chanh said. About 1 per­cent appeared unaffected by the antibo­dies. the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston, whose 1974 theory is the foundaton of the San Antonio team's research work, termed the report "very exciting." "I think they are on the right track," Rodkey said. "They h a ve some very Leo Rodkey, an associate professor at good ideas that deserve further testing." We're Houston's Largest Gay Audience. We're the readers of the Montrose Voice. We're the people you reach when you advertise in the Montrose Voice. We're about 27,000 readers weekly. (There's still another 26,870 of us not pictured above.) You know what else? We, the readers of th<• Voic<', spend somewhere around $6,000,000 u•eek/y on the things we buy-clothes, partying at night, apartm<>nts, cars and repair, hair care, serious things and silly things. <'frs, that's $6 million weekly.) Got somethmg to sell next week? We've got the mon!'y to buy it. Maybe all you have to do is ask-by advertising to us through our newspaper. The Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE DIAL 529-8490 for ADVERTI SING or HOME DELIVERY t-ier<·s h< .v w • l1g( f (! ti j ~Uf(.>S 0;-isr> :S1\lr buttOf\ 10000 COP es Friday 1 SC.JO •P•H ruesd~y 1r mpo1an•y suspended) Assumed P"" on rate 1a( 1or 2 a Thu$ es1°rn1!e<l $';;;e~$~:kapg~o;";,:1~~~ ~~1;1w~e'~'::1~~~:~ 111~;~ •::~:e ;~~;e~e:~~~9 us 5pends ~~~CilT ~~ ';.~5ti~JEE )~EfvNt~JU~~ E?t~~~MF ~ri~~~E: ~F~LE~~Eg.: ::¥~~SF';;~~~ r~1~ ;0~~ APRIL 10, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Light Rail Plan Includes Route Through Montrose By Linda Wyche Montrose Voice City Councilman George Greanias said Thursday that he will not form an opin­ion on the Metropolitan Transit Author­ity's light rail plan until he "takes a long look at it." The plan, which would greatly impact Greanias' District C, which includes Montrose, was outlined Tuesday to the Metro board of directors by general manager Alan Kiepper. The 15-mile, $750 million rail system is part of a $2.2 billion project which, along with light rail, includes new buses and a bus mall. The system features trolley like cars which draw electric power from over­head lines. The tracks will run down the middle of Post Oak, Main Street and Richmond Avenue. lt is the Richmond route that is a major concern of Greanias. "This plan will take some time to understand," he said adding, ''I'll have to take a close look at it." The widening of Richmond, a project heavily pushed by Greanias, was recently completed. Businesses that sur­vived the two years of disruption are just beginning to recover and the idea of once again having major construction along that thoroughfare is something that will weigh heavily when the coun­cilman forms his opinion of the plan. "I am extremely concerned about the affect on businesses in the area. We cer­tainly must consider this since we've finished the work (on Richmond) and did such a beautiful job," expla ined Greanias. Part of the cost of the plan includes money needed to acquire property but no compensation is made for disruption of business. The proposed Richmond route will cr.oss Weslayan, Buffalo Speedway, Kirby, Shepherd and Montrose, with a regional transit center at Main and Richmond. The plan calls for the system to be ready by 1998. The 1998 completion date can be reached only if Metro raises the neces-montrose VOICE HOUSTON, TEXAS ISSUE 337 FRIDAY. APR IL 10. 1987 Published weekly Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright 1987 Office hours: 8am-6pm Henry McClurg.publlsher-ed1tor Linda Wyche man•gmg editor David Roumfort .product1on SUBSCRIPTIONS (713) 529-8490 ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT (713) 529-8490 Jerry Mulholland1advert1smg dlfector Ken Boge/account executive POSTMASTER Send address corrections to 408 Avon­dale. Houston, TX 77006-3028 Sul»cflpt1on rare m US (by Voice camer or US Mail} $1 25 per week (upto21ssues),$65 peryear(52weeks). or $32 50 per six months (26 weeks) Nat1onal advert11mg representative_ A1vendell Marketing, PO Boll 1268, Pla1nfleld. NJ 07061 . (201) 754-4348 Final advert11mg deadline AU display ads 5pm 2 days Prtor 10 publication date. All class1fled ads 2pm 1 day prior to pubhcation date Notice to advertisers Advertising rate schedule Eight-A was effecwe April 11. 1986 Respons1b1l1ty We do not assume lmanc1al respons1b1hty lor cl11m1 by advef11sers but readers ere asked to advise the newspaper of any 1usp1c1on of fradulent or deceptive advertlsmg and suspicions will be investigated Newa Hrv1ce United Press lntemat1onal sary money through the sale of bonds. Before a bond issue can be brought before voters the metro board must approve Kiepper's proposal. The board will analyze public opinion presented through a series of public hearings before deciding whether to proceed with the plan. Greanias believes that, if voters approve the sale of $1.36 billion in bonds needed to finance the project, it will be late 1988 before any construction can begin. If the green light is issued, Kiepper says the plan will generate 9,275 jobs. This is also an element that city offi­cials will consider when looking at the cost of implementing such a system. "How the cost of the program benefits the community as a whole" is also a major issue with Greanias. "We cannot look at. just one segment." Unlike Greanias, some members of council immediately expressed opposi­tion to the plan. Recognizing that pre­vious rail plans were handily defeated, Greanias believes this latest attempt to solve Houston's every-growing traffic problems is going to face an uphill climb. He said, "This is going to be a tough thing to get through." He also indicated that powerful business interests will be influential in determining if Houston will join other major American cities in revitalizing a century old form of urban transit. A similar system opened in Portland, Oreg., in 1986 and Los Angeles officials Nelson Comes in 2nd in Dallas Mont r ose Voice New s Services DALLAS (UPI)-Longtime Texas gay activist Bill Nelson came in second last Saturday in a three-way race for a Dal­las City Council seat but captured only about 23% of the vote. At-large incumbent Jerry Rucker won without a runoff with about 66% of the vote. Businessman Roy H. Williams was third with about 10%. The projected fi nal figures gave Rucker about 49,800, Nelson, president of the Dallas Gay Alliance, about 17,400 and Williams about 7,800. Two Nelson supporters near election eve videotaped a 30-minute discussion responding to remarks by the TV evan­gelist James Robison and land devel­oper Jim Williams Jr. that were aired on three Dallas UHF television stations. During a 30-minute discussion, Robi­son and Williams said homosexuals were one group trying to take control of the City Council and cited the candi­dacy of Nelson. Robison also said he did not believe that Nelson, if elected, could truthfully take the oath of office to uphold city and state laws, including the sodomy law. After complaining t hat he was entitled to equa l time under the Fair­ness Doctrine, the th ree stations, KDFI­TV, KLTJ-TV and KDTX-TV, agreed to air Nelson's response. Nelson's response was a 30-minute discussion between Charlotte Taft, director of the Routh Street Women's Clinic and a member of the Dallas Area Women's Political Caucus, a nd Ann Brown, a school teacher and Nelson volunteer. hope to clear up their freeways when their system is completed in 1989. Older systems are still in use in Boston, Phila­delphia, New Orleans and San Fran­cisco. Metro's board has scheduled six pub­lic meetings to explain the plan and will hold final public debates May 14-16. The dates and locations of the public hearings are: April 20, Lincoln Hotel Post Oak; April 22, Marriott Astrodome Hotel; April 28, Holiday Inn, 9100 Gulf Freeway; April 20, Magnolia Multi­Service Center; May 5, KashmereMulti­Service Center; and May 7, West End Mult-Service Center. All meetings begin at 7:30 p.m. The Viet Nam Restaurant and Andy presents the Finest Food in town at the Best Prices Open: 11am-10pm Sun., 11am­mldnight M-F, 11am-2am Sat. 3215 Main at Elgin 526-0917 Roaches ________________ ? Fleas ______________________ ? Rodents ________________ ? Fire Ants ________________ ? & Various Other Little Annoying Critters ? RE5ULT5 Pest Control 223-4000 Licensed and regulated by the Structural Pest Control Board of Texas One teenager in ten has a secret. One Teenager in Ten: Writings by Gay and Lesbian Youth Edited by Ann Heron "For every generation that comes ou t, these essays will be invaluable." - Gay Community News 'There is a rare sensibility displayed in many of these essays that is nothing short of astonishing. International Gay News Agency (IGNA) an important and necessary book powerful and very poignant. " - Womanews "One teenager. in ten": according to Kinsey, that's the proportion of gays to straights in this country. One Teenager in Ten: twenty-eight young men and women from all over the United States and Canada, from fifteen to twenty-four yea rs of age, speak out about their coming-out experiences - about what it is to be young and gay in our society today. $3.95 in bookstores, or use this coupon to order by mail ···-······-·-···-·····--···-······TO ORDER··--·-·····-·---·--·······-·-····· Please send me _ copies of One Teenager in Ten at $4.50 each, postpaid. Enclosed is $ _ _ . name ___________ ~ address _____ ___ ___ ~ city state ___ zip------ ALYSON Publ,ications, PO Box 2783, Boston, MA 02208 P-5 4 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 10, 1987 AKE THE RIGHT ECTIO • • on Houston's outrageous New conference Call our exciting phone service has become the rage In canfornla, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, Now we have made It available to gay men right here In Texas! we are the first and biggest company in the field-our conferences are HOT!! When you dial you Will be connected to an ongoing, UNINHIBITED CONFERENCE CALL, with up to nine men from all over Houston. NOT PROFESSIONALS! Just nine Interesting men, like yourself, anxious to make new acQualn­tances. LIVE! NOT A RECORDING. TOP or bottom, short or tall, young or old, they're all here! It's only $2 *-cheap by any standards, and billed discreetly to your phone bill. No credit cards are reQulred. vour anonymity is guaranteed. call 713-976-9696 now and see what you have been missing. • Houst~~: 713-976-9696 *This call is only S2 in most of the 713 area codes. Matching is random and you may not hear another caller ai:id yet still be charged. call at peak night times to avoid unwanted charges. Addi· tional toll charges may apply in some areas. No Win for Britt in SF By United Press International Democratic Party activist Nancy Pelosi captured the most votes among 14 can­didates in a San Francisco congres­sional race to succeed the late Rep. Sala Burton but failed to net enough votes to avoid a runoff. Her runoff, however, will not be against second-place winner Harry Britt. Voters went to the polls to select a successor to Burton, a Democrat who died Feb. 1 of cancer. The two strongest candidates, both Democrats, were Pelosi, 47, and San Francisco Supervi­sor Britt, 48, who is homosexual. Pelosi collected 38,021 votes, or 36 per­cent, to become the Democrat in the runoff. Britt, formerly of Port Arthur, Texas, had hoped to become the first openly gay person elected to Congress. He received 34,031 votes, or 32 percent. But lacking a clear 50 percent win, Pelosi was forced into a June 2 runoff against the top Republican vote-getter, Harriet Ross, and four minor party can­didates. Before her death, Burton endorsed Pelosi. She also drew support from San Francisco Mayor Dianne Feinstein , California Assembly Speaker Willie Brown and other Democratic leaders. Democratic Supervisor Bill Maher had 14,914 votes, or 14 percent, and three other Democrats received a total of 10 percent. Ross had 2,922 votes, or 3 percent, to defeat three other Republicans for a spot in the runoff. Other candidates criticized Pelosi throughout the election for her wealth, her ties to influential politicians and the fact that she has never held an elected office. Pelosi, a former state Democratic Party chairman and successful party fund-raiser, said she is qualified for the office because of her community work in San Francisco and her familiarity with local and national politics. Pelosi is the daughter of former Mary­land congressman and Baltimore Mayor Thomas D'Alesandro Jr. Analysts say much of Pelosi's popu­larity stems from the endorsement by Burton, who died of cancer shortly after being sworn into a second term. As a result, voters associate Pelosi with the popular congresswoman and her hus­band, Rep. Philip Burton, who held the congressional seat from 1964 to until his death in 1983. While in Congress, the Burtons amassed a liberal coalition of minori­ties, union members and environmen­talists who dominated the city's politics and were called the "Burton machine" by Democrats and Republicans alike. Britt was considered Pelosi's closest contender because of his strong support from the city's gay community, which makes up a substantial percent of the district's eligible voters. Voter turnout was higher than expected and election officials credited heavy media coverage and the switch to daylight-saving time for the number of voters. The final election is scheduled for June 2. California's 5th Congressional Dis­trict encompasses 85 percent of San Francisco. Pl~y Safe! Coffee Shop 1102 Westheimer - 522-3332 Proudly Serving Montrose 24 Hours a Day Steaks, Seafood, Beer, Wine, Champagne Daily Specials Breakfast, Lu.nch & Dinner M(MB(A 0' @*lHi~ Thanks for Your Continued Support of Aid for AIDS BACCHUS Congratulations R.C. (Bosemary) Cuellar! 1st Place Wild Cow Bide in G.S.G.B...A. Sunday B-9pm Mary Ann Mahony & Mata Hari Thursday Steak Right Bring your own steak. We supply the rest. 780 Schnapps Anytime during Aprill Happy Hour Tues.-Fri. 'till 9pm 523 Lovett 523- 3396 APRIL 10, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 Rock Against AIDS By William C. Trott United Press International Appearances by Bob Geldof, Elton John, Boy George and George Michaels highlighted an AIDS-fighting benefitat London's Wembley Arena in what was a night of musical comebacks. Michaels, making his first solo appearance since the demise of Wham, drew a huge ovation when he took the stage. John sang a couple of rousing songs in his first appearance since throat surgery and the annoucement of the breakup of his marriage. Boy George sang his hit "Everything I Own" and told the crowd, "This is the first time I've sung for 2 years." Much of accompaniment was pro­vided by the Super Group-John Ent­wistle of the Who, Andy Summers of the Police and drummer Zak Starkey, son of Ringo Starr. For the finale most of the stars got together, threw condoms into the crowd and sang "Stand By Me." The show raised $180,000 from ticket sales and organizers expect more from donations when the concert is seen by an estimated 100 million people on tele­vision. China Says It Has First AIDS Victim BEIJING (UPI)-A Chinese man who lived in the United States for more than 10 years has died of AIDS in southern China, becoming the country's first native victim of the disease, the official Xinhua News Agency reported April 3. Xinhua said the 34-year-old victim, whose relatives refused to allow him to be identified, fell ill early last year in the United States where he had been work­ing in a restaurant since 1975. He had previously lived in Hong Kong for about three years. The man was admitted to a New York hospital, but his condition failed to improve. In November, he returned to his hometown in southern Fujian Pro­vince for further treatment. "Although he received adequate care in a Fujian hospital, he died of AIDS on March 26," Xinhua quoted a Health Ministry official as saying. "This is the first AIDS case ever diagnosed by Chi­nese experts," he said. Hospital Recommends Death Penalty TAIPEI, Taiwan (UPI)-Taiwan's most prestigious hospital Tuesday recommended the death penalty for AIDS carriers who knowingly infect others and penal ties for doctors who fail to report cases of the disease. Dr. Wang Cheng-yi of the Taiwan University Hospital called willful AIDS infection "tantamount to murdering and thus should be punished accord­ingly." Doctors who fail to report cases of acquired immune deficiency syndrome should be fined at least $290 and face .other penalties, he said. There was no immediate indication how the government would react to the suggestion. Taiwan has only one con­firmed aids case and the patient, a homosexual businessman who traveled abroad often, died in Taipei half a year ago. 6 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 10, 1987 Heterosexual Risk of AIDS is 'Very Much Exaggerated,' Claiins Ariny Study By Larry Doyle UPI Science Writer CHICAGO- An influential Army study purporting to document transmission of AIDS from infected prostitutes to soldi­ers is flawed and has led to unwar­ranted fears the virus will quickly infiltrate the heterosexual population, a health official charged earlier this month. John Potterat, director of infectious disease at the El Paso County Health Department in Colorado Springs, Colo., said April 2 that there is good evidence suggesting the soldiers lied to investiga­tors at Walter Reed Army Hospital in Washington and were infected through "classic high-risk activities"­intravenous drug use or homosexual contact. Potterat also said other evidence of female-to-male transmission is rare and infection from heterosexual intercourse unlikely, at least for men. He said that while men can apparently infect women, numbers of infected heterosex­ual men are likely to remain small, mak­ing a heterosexual epidemic unlikely. "My feeling is that the threat to hete­rosexuals is very much exaggerated," Potterat said. "There's this idea that there's going to be this real flood of hete­rosexual cases and I don't think we're going to see that. "I think it's going to be more of a trickle than anything. Why panic the entire population when in point of fact the risk is very, very small." Walter Reed researchers and other health officials, including one from the federal Centers for Disease Control, acknowledged that heterosexuals are probably less likely to contract AIDS than are homosexuals, but said the risk does exist. "It's perfectly clear (the virus) is not spreading as fast in the heterosexual population," said Dr. Tom Peterman, of the Atlanta-based CDC. "But I don't think there's any question that trans­mission occurs. The question is whether it occurs frequently." Potterat's charges, leveled in a letter to the Journal of the American Medical Association, refueled a continuing debate over what conditions are neces- Italian Baker Gets Tough with AIDS Rumors VENICE, Italy (UPI)-A baker, alarmed by rumors he was suffering from AIDS, posted 200 leaflets earlier this month on waIJs in Chioggia, an industrial port at the southern end of the Venice lagoon. The leaflets carried a photocopy of a medical certificate stating Giordano Villan is not suffering from acquired immune deficiency syndrome and a few words of admonition to his fellow citi­zens. "Because of inaccurate information, the AIDS virus in recent years has created a crazy form of racism in society," Villan said April 2 in the lea­flet. "For the information of the rumor­mongers and credulous people who believed them, here is a copy of my test certificate." The baker said he blamed the rumors for a recent loss of clients. sary to transmit the virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome. In October 1985, Dr. Robert Redfield and his colleagues published the first study appearing to document heterosex­ual AIDS transmission outside Third World countries. The Walter Reed reseachers interviewed nine men carry­ing the virus whose only admitted high risk activity was heterosexual inter­course with prostitutes. Although the study was later critic­ized by scientists questioning the truth­fulness of soldiers asked to admit to punishable offenses, the researchers defended it. Potterat and associates tested their hypothesis that soldiers are more likely to reveal homosexual behavior or drug use to civilian doctors by interviewing 20 soldiers infected with the AIDS virus. Although only four admitted homo­sexual contact to military doctors, 14 acknowledged such activity to civilian doctors. Three people admitted to intravenous drug use, compared to one in the military investigation. Dr. David Wright, one of the Walter Reed researchers, defended the Army studies and said the hospital has since seen a number of men who were infected sexually by spouses who contracted the virus from blood transfusions, "which pretty much proves that it can happen." "I don't know what the frequency with which it occurs, but it does occur, and it's important to realize that," he said. "No one wants to believe that there is heterosexual transmission, and maybe that's why they don't want to believe us." As of March 30, the CDC said 33,482 cases of AIDS had been reported in the United States, resulting in 19,394 deaths. Of those cases, 1,261 have been classified as heterosexually transmit­ted, 630 among Americans and 631 among Haitians and central Africans. The ratio of American male-to-females contracting the virus heterosexually is about l-to-5. Sexual Healthv sex is good for your mental well-being. Plav Safe. A Public Service Message from J 0 E . a Private Organization MEMBERSHIP INQUIRIES may be made Tuesday & Thursday 8 9pm. Friday & Saturday 11pm- 1 30am. Sunday 6-9pm. THERE ARE RESTRICTIONS. Memberships are 11m1ted to reasonably­attractrve out-of-the-cl?set lrberated adult gay men who are secure with therr sexuality We drscrrmrnate on the bas rs that new members must be in reasonable cond1t1on for therr body type and (even more important) that they possess a mental attitude that will contribute to the overall atmosphere at J O E J 0 E meets at the COTTAGE PLAYHOUSE at 611 PACIFIC (look for the Play Safe Flag) () 'And we're eating soon, so stay out of the kitten jar." Mr. Ed spills his guts. APRIL 10, 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 7 Voice Comics 1/-11 Jason is strong on "How" and weak on "Why." ANNOVnlG \~'IEt-l\\o~s -#-1{,'!, - Tl-1E. C.U<:K.00 ME.i~t.IOt-\E. Bob exercises extremely poor judgment. Dutch boy's nightmare. 8 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 10, 1987 A Cruise to Relllelllber "Doing America with Bob Damron" by Dan Delbex And it certainly was. When I was first approached with the idea of taking an all gay cruise it did not entirely thrill me. The thought of being in a somewhat confined area with 750 gay men and women I equated with being at a gay freedom day parade and not being able to leave, but I was soon proved wrong. It all began in New Orleans, the port of embarkation, where days before one could observe the steady trickle of potential passengers, for it was written in their eyes. Even the bars were begin­ning to resemble a bit of Mardi Gras three weeks past. Arriving at the pier on Saturday morning I was taken aback by the line of passengers waiting to check in. You could certainly tell these people didn't want to miss one moment. My surprise with the throngs of people was only overwhelmed by the number of bags that were being checked. It is only a one week cruise but everybody's a Duchess. The Mississippi River from aboard the SS Bermuda Star The cruise line, the S.S. Bermuda Star, reports three times the normal amount of luggage checked in. Once the gear was stowed, we proceeded down the Mississippi for what would turn out to be a true vacation experience. The passengers constituted a broad group of ages and personalities and were not lacking for pretty faces and bodies. Yet stero;ds aside, the interac­tion and ambience relating between fel­low passengers was a wonderful sight. As one individual said, "The adventure begins when attitudes are left behind" and after the second day we all became much more relaxed with one another. The entertainment was far superior to any other cruise I have been on before. Rita Moreno, the headliner, cancelled due to a family emergency but there was no lack for entertainers at all. Wayland and Madame were in rare and wonder­fully trite form, while Celeste, the cabaret singer from New York served as the perfect cruise hostess. Gotham, a comedy/ singing trio also from New York were always on their toes and giving a great performance. Tom Ammiano, a very timely comedian from San Francisco, kept me rolling on the floors during and out of his shows. For those in for a more serious mode of entertainment, authors Armistead Maupin and Quentin Crisp gave excel­lent full circle readings and conversa­tions. The ship certainly did not lack for par­ties and excitement. The disco and piano bar were always going until the wee hours of the morning. But perhaps the most outrageous event was the cos­tume party. Now I know why there are three times the normal amount of luggage, a single steamer was needed just for some of the headdresses. It could have been dubbed "Mardi Gras on the high seas" I person­ally enjoyed watching the shipboard romances that ensued and changed, practically on a daily basis. I would love to getinto stories of those certain revolv­ing doors but I best save that for a Harlequin novel. The ports of call, with the exception of Key West, were not too exciting. But I fee 1 that when one takes a cruise the real enjoyment can be found at sea. The wel­come we received at Key West was truly befitting a royal visit. Many of the town's citizens had either come to the dock to greet us or had opened up their places of business for special tours and parties. The other two ports, both in Mexico, were Cozumel and Play a del Carmen de! Maranda. They were good for ninety cent margueritas and Aca Joe clothes, but that was. about it. After speaking with well over 100 peo­ple and gathering their views on the cruise, I would estimate that 80 percent of the passengers would take another gay cruise and of those at least 50 per­cent booked again for next year. One person who came on alone said, "taking this cruise as a single was the best thing I could have ever done." I was also curious as to the interpreta­tion of the women on board. Said one lady from California, "I did not feel intimidated at all by the lack of women Direct Burial or Cremation CREffiATlOn SERVICE mTERilATlOnAL® Operated by James H Murphy Funeral Homes prli~~~ $395 -'. 363-9999 on the ship. I enjoyed the total group and hope that other gay women will see their way to join in on this event." Now if I were asked my thoughts on a repeat voyage (for those of you who care), I would say judging on the cruise line itself, I would not go again. But for what the Bermuda Star lacked, the RS.V.P. staff surely made up for; and for that reason, I would not hestitate to rebook. I cannot pass on this article without mentioning the great group of people we had at our table nightly. A sort of instant family for the week, and new friends for some time to come. Sylvester and his lover Rick really helped to make it a great table. A cruise is not generally a cheap vaca­tion. In fact, you should plan on spend­ing anywhere from $1,000 on up (depending on your spending habits in ports of call). Taking into consideration that this includes your food and gratui­ties it is quite a reasonable holiday. The food, although not being four star, is a definite two trying to push three. I found that the food improved as the cruise rolled on; however, the mid­night buffets always seem to lack qual­ity. If you enjoy having fun, meeting new people, making new friends, rekindling old friendships or old loves, this is a vacation for you. I must hand it to R.S.V.P., for what they have done is no small undertaking and the detail to which it has all been completed has defi­nitely made this a cruise to remember and relive. FLOWERS & GIFTS European and Tropical Cut Flowers, Plants, Fruit Ir Gourmet Baskets, Imported Chocolates, and Stuffed Toys A~allable. 1811 Indiana at Dunlavy 523-3791 Major Credit Cards Accepted ~n Jalkmoriam MIKE MIESCH Mike Miesch died Wednesday, April 1, 1987 at Jefferson Davis Hospital of complica­tions due to AIDS. He served for several years as co­producer of KPFT's Wilde 'n' Stein rad io program. Mike is survived by his sister, Toni Per­kins, his mother, two brothers and several friends. A memorial gathering will be held Satur day, April 11, at KPFT, 419 Lovett. Call them at 526-4000 for the time of the gathering. BOB CAREY Bob Carey, 46, died Friday, April 3, 1987 at his home in Houston Bob graduated from South Padre Island High School in Beaumont, Texas in 1955. For the next 10 years he lived his dream singing and dancing in theater in New York City. He returned to Texas to fulfill his next dream which was training and raising tho­roughbread horses at his Virdessa Farms in Silsbee, Texas He lived in Houston for approximately the last 10 years, continuing his acting career by owning and operating "Action Packed Grams Inc.," a novelty telegram service. Bob was preceded in death by his lover of 27 years. Bob, who died unexpectedly of a year attack a year-and-a-half ago. His ashes will be buried at sea. Bob had a full life which included many friends. A memorial service will be held on Sunday, April 12 at St. Luke's Presbyterian Church, 8915 Timberside (off S. Braeswood, between Stella Link and Buffalo Speedway) at 4:00 p.m. CHUCK BUFORD HAMMONS January 27, 1942-March 6, 1987 Chuck passed way on March 6, 1987 at the Institute for Immunological Disorders. He is survived by his parents, Ruby and Guss Harnmons of Monroe, La., and lifemate, Robert Badlato of Houston. Chuck has been a Montrose resident for the past 15 years and is dearly loved and remembered by all his friends and loved ones At Chuck's request, no memorial service will be held The kindness and concern from so many has been heartwarming and greatly appreciated by his loved ones. Our love always Robert. Jim, Bill, Helen, Susan, Corey and Jay. OUR POLICY Thto M•mtr()!I Voice is honored to commemorate lh4't hves o f our readers and 'nendl or relallves of our readers. with an announ<:emeru Fr~ds Q< relatives should provide us w1lh 1nlorma· hon 1n person (not by mail or over the phone) There 1s no charge for th11 service Montrose Voice It's The Place to Advertise APRIL 10, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 Last Chance for Love 1732 WESTHEIMER HOuston, Texas 77098 (713) 523-2213 Never a Cover Hot Men • Cold Beer • Never a Dress Code Sunday, April 12, 6pm Mr. Almost Butch II $100 First $50 Second $25 Third plus prizes donated by Eagle Leather · 1732 Westheimer _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 523-2213 10 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 10, 1987 Church Group Reaches Decision on Bakker By Cathy Cash DUNN, N.C. (UPI)-Executives of the North Carolina Assemblies of God reached a decision on whether to expel fallen PTL founder Jim Bakker and his chief lieutenant or accept their resigna­tions but declined to reveal the ruling. Bakker and new PTL President Richard Dortch chose not to appear at the secret meeting of the 16-member state board of the charismatic denomi­nation. The meeting began under a secrecy "mandate" Tuesday and did not end until 2 a.m. Wednesday. The group said it reached a decision on whether to accept the resignations that Bakker and Dortch submitted March 19 or recom­mend they be drummed out of the church. A board spokesman said the decision would be sent to the national headquar­ters in Springfield, Mo. He said there would be no public anouncement. Bakker resi~ned from the denomina­tion and the $172 million PTL television-entertainment ministry he founded after revealing he had a sexual encounter with a church secretary and paid her to hush up the affair. Dortch, who became PTL president after Bakker surrendered the ministry New Wave Club Agrees to Fine DALLAS (UPI)-Managers of the Starck Club, a trendy New Wave bar stung by a drug raid last summer, have agreed to settle charges they condoned drug use by paying a $10,500 fine and banning dancing for two weeks. Owner Blake Woodall said Wednes­day he agreed to the fine because it equaled the amount he would have paid in legal fees to defend the club from los­ing its liquor license. Dallas police raided the bar Aug. 7, arresting 36 people. After the raid, police complained to the Texas Alco­holic Beverage Commission that the club condoned drug use. "We deny these allegations. We say we did not have anything to do with drug use," Woodall said. But police said drug use at the club was so open, it was evident to anyone who entered. Woodall denied that by agreeing to pay a fine he was admitting guilt. He said the amount of the settlement was one-fourth of what the commission had originally asked. The settlement also includes a ban on dancing at the club for 15 days, from April 20 through May 4, at the request of Dallas police, which issues dance per­mits. Woodall called the ban "kind of inter­esting." "If you come into the club and dance in our visibility, we are going to take you outside. We are not going to keep you from dancing. We are going to ask you to leave," Woodall said. General Manager Greg McCone said the club has booked alternative forms of entertainment for the period covered by the dance ban. The night of the raid, 17 people were arrested for public intoxication, 15 for drug possession and four, including two employees, on warrants alleging the sale of drugs. Eleven others from whom police had allegedly bought drugs were later arrested on warrants. to Moral Majority founder Jerry Fal­well, also resigned from the denomina­tion. Dortch reportedly handled the negoti­ations to pay church secretary Jessica Hahn for not revealing her tryst with Bakker seven years ago. Dortch has refused to discuss the allegations with reporters. Charles Cookman, North Carolina district superintendent of the church, told reporters the board was "under a mandate (from church headquarters) not to divulge the results of the meeting today." "We have 90 days to act on the infor­mation we have," he said. "Once we have concluded our deliberations here in North Carolina, we send our decision to what we call the executive presbytery in Springfield, Mo. They then act on our recommendation." Bakker and Dortch were asked to appear before the board, but neither attended and Cookman said their deci­sion in effect eliminated one of the three options available to church execu­tives. Cookman said the board would con­sider only whether to accept Bakker's and Dortch's resignations or reject their resignations and oustem from the min­istry. A third option-that they undergo a two-year "restoration" process-was not considered since neither man requested it or indicated any desire to remain as Assemblies of God ministers. Bakker was ordained 23 years ago in the same church where Tuesday's meet­ing was held. Cookman, district super­intendent for the last 21 years, was one of those present when Bakker was ordained. Bakker initially blamed his problems on a relentless investigation by The Charlotte Observer, but later said he quit to prevent a hostile takeover of his ministry and its Heritage USA resort at Fort Mill, S.C., by a rival minister subse­quently identified as evangelist Jimmy Swaggart. Everybody's flocking to our new Rear Entrance Come in through the back door on Friday 8r Saturday Night 1022 Westheimer 528-8851 >- Q Q co I Cf) '- ::J 0 0 ~ t::;J l\::::::1 C11n 81'."Cr SI 25 Oral! 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A service charge of $2 +tolls, if any, billed discreetly to your phone bill. 12 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 10, 1987 DUNLAVY er: UJ ~ ~ RALPH ST. t­CJ) UJ :: E.J.'s MANDELL , ., Friday Beer Bust 6-12pm Hamburgers $1 ~ ..., Tuesday Pool Tournament 8pm r' \.. r Saturday Liquor Bust 4-7pm $6 2517 Ralph Street at Westheimer 527-9071 ., r Sunday Beer Bust 4-12pm All You Can Hold Burgers $1 ~ .... ..., , Wednesday Thursday Liquor Bust Buck Night 9pm-midnight $1 Well, long necks $6 all you can hold & schnapps ~ .... ~ ..., APRIL 10, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 Critics Uninipressed 'With Reagan's AIDS Ganibit By Celia Hooper WASHINGTON (UPl)-President Rea­gan twice in recent weeks broached the subject of AIDS, but some experts believe he took the wrong tack in his verbal entrance into the fight against an epidemic that has killed over 19,000 Americans. On March 31, Reagan and French Prime Minister Jacques Chirac jointly announced the settlement of a dispute between French and American labora­tories over the discovery of the AIDS virus, and on April 1 Reagan made his first major address on AIDS before the Philadelphia College of Physicians. "After almost six years of silence on the epidemic," said Rep. Henry Wax­man D.-Calif., chairman of the House Er.ergy and Commerce Subcommittee on Health, "the president has finally said that he will fight the disease." White House aides insist Reagan's entrance into the AIDS discussion came just because the College of Physicians was an appropriate forum. Spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said, "It was quite a natural evolution. This is a national dis­ease that has come upon the public very rapidly. A year ago ... people didn't understand AIDS or thought it was con­fined to a small segment of society." But Waxman cautioned, "If(Reagan) stops at this speech, we will have years more of bickering between public heal th figures and moralists, more infections and more deaths." Harsher congressional criticism of Reagan's address came from a member of his own party: "This peril that con­fronts the nation is not comprised of words," said Sen. Lowell Weicker, rank­ing Republican on the Senate appropri­ations subcommittee that oversees acquired immune deficiency syndrome research. "It's comprised of very complex vir­uses and a medical mystery that nobody has been able to unlock, and it ain't going to be unlocked by the speech in Philadelphia by the president," Weicker said. Speaking to reporters following the president's speech, Weicker said, "The most damaging piece of deception as far as the president is concerned is that he says, 'I'm asking for $100 million more in AIDS research.' "That sounds very good until you hear that he is asking for a $600 million cut in the funds to go to the National Institutes of Health for basic biomedi­cal research. The net ofall that is he has cut $500 million for AIDS." The National Academy of Sciences, in a special report last October, urged expenditure of $1 billion for AIDS edu­cation and $1 billion for research annu­ally by 1990. The report chastised the administration for a lackluster educa­tion effort. Until his speech, Reagan delegated visibility on AIDS policy to four physi­cians at the Department of Health and Hum an Services: Secretary Otis Bowen, Assistant Secretary Robert Windom, FDA Commissioner Frank Young and Surgeon General C. Everett Koop. James Brown, spokesman for Win­dom, said that Reagan's low profile did not mean that he is unconcerned with the issue. Brown pointed to medical advances, such as the discovery of the AIDS virus, the rapid development of blood tests and the drug AZT, the budget increase for AIDS and the sur­geon general's report on AIDS as major administration victories. "These were all done under appoin­tees of President Reagan," Brown said. "He would get the blame if things wer­en't done; he should get the credit when they are done." Dr. Edward Brandt, chancellor of the University of Maryland in Baltimore and former assistant secretary of health, agreed that research progress on AIDS was "unparalleled." He said he was generally satisfied with progress against the disease but said he had not seen Reagan's speech. "I don't worry about what the presi­dent says. I worry about what the Public Health Service is doing-that's the important thing. My own view is that the PHS just needs to be free to do what needs to be done." Asked if the administration would adopt a "watch what we do, not what we say" approach, Fitzwater said, "A little bit." Brown said the PHS top doctors, Koop and Windom, were both "delighted to have the president speak out." But outside the government, health and AIDS experts were neither deligh­ted nor surprised with Reagan's speech on AIDS. Dr. June Osborn, epidemiologist and dean of the University of Michigan School of Public Health, said she found no surprises in Reagan's comments. "I was sorely disappointed," Osborn said. "The speech signals no change on Rea­gan's part-that's the problem. People were looking forward to some federal leadership," Osborn said. In his speech, Reagan advocated a modest federal role in AIDS education: "It must be to give educators accurate information about the disease. How that information is used must be up to •••••••••••••• HENRY'S 1 PHOTO •••••••••••••• WE'VE MOVED Now located at 408 Avondale --The Montrose Voice Building­Around the corner from our old location OPEN DAILY 9-6 CLOSED WEEKENDS schools and parents." Reagan stressed instruction in moral­ity as a complement to AIDS education. He told reporters that he favored AIDS education "as long as they teach that one of the answers to it is abstinence-if you say it's not how you do it, but that you don't do it." Stressing the key role of education in the fight against AIDS, Osborn said Reagan's approach to AIDS stood "in shocking contrast to those of (other) industrialized nations that have frank educational campaigns that assume there are some people who don't practice monogamy and chastity. We owe all citizens-including those who don't practice monogamy and chastity­leadership and guidance on AIDS." Great Britain, for example, has begun mailing out brochures, posting AIDS warnings on billboards and has been broadcasting AIDS-related messages on television. Osborn was most critical of a vow Reagan made in his speech: "I am deter­mined that we'll find a cure for AIDS .... We'll find a way or make one." "He seemed to be saying if we just try hard enough we will get a cure for AIDS," Osborn said. "That's the last thing on the list of promises we should be giving .... We may never find a cure for the viral disease." Fitzwater said that when Reagan referred to a "cure" in his speech he was speaking in general terms. "I think 'cure' was used as a generic word to des­cribe any number of medical solutions to the problem," Fitzwater said. "It was· not meant to be a medical term." Thomas Stoddard, executive director of the Lambda Legal Defense and Edu­cation Fund for homosexual issues, said that if Reagan's AIDS speech marked the beginning of a more forthright approach to the issue, "It is not a prom­ising beginning. His statements were naive and ignorant about AIDS and about the federal government's role in combating the disease." Stoddard said that to date only Koop had been "forthright and frank" in addressing the AIDS crisis. "No other official has fully faced up to AIDS," Stoddard said. "He is a hero standing alone." Koop has carried a frank anti-AIDS message to audiences across the coun­try, promoting sex education in the early grade school years, and preven­tion of AIDS through abstinence, monogamy, and for those who practice neither, use of condoms. His efforts prompted a public scolding in March from conservative Eagle Forum President Phyllis Schlafly and a continuing public disagreement with Education Secretary William Bennett. The disagreement over AIDS educa­tion between Bennett and Koop began in January during a Cabinet-level Domestic Policy Council meeting dur­ing which Bennett described the Public Health Service approach as "morally empty." The dispute has since evolved into a gentlemen's agreement to dis­agree. Bennett recently told school board officials he doubted the differences would ever be resolved because the issue "is one where people feel very strongly." White House press spokesman Marlin Fitzwater denied that there were major divisions over AIDS within the admin­istration: "They're coming at it from dif­ferent perspectives," in that Bennett is concerned with educating children and Koop with educating adults about methods. Koop is approaching it from a public health standpoint, Fitzwater said, while "Bennett's job is values, educa­tion, information, the emotional status" of AIDS. Dr. Sidney Wolfe, head of the consu­mer health group Public Citizen Health Research Group, said, "If Reagan per­sonally would say the kinds of things that his surgeon general is saying, I would have confidence that (Reagan) is doing more than just deceiving the pub- !. " IC. "I would rather educate (sexually active) kids while they are alive than pray for them after they're dead as Rea­gan seems to be doing." 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Pool Tournament Wednesdays 3pm $1 Enhy Fee 1st Place 70°10 of fees, 2nd Place 30°10 of fees 220 Avondale 529-7525 • APRIL 10, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 Yet Another One of Dirty Sally's Morning Parties! "Easter Egg Hunt'' 7am-2pm· FricJoy A.JJri/ 11 P. T .L. (Pass the Liquor) Jim and Tammy Fay Party April 17 Come as the Best Tammy or Jim and win a prize April 18 Easter Egg Decorating Begins 2pm, continues all afternoon Easter Sunday, April 19 Sally's Easter Bonnet Contest and Egg Judging 7pm New on Tuesdays! Come Munch and Win A Tab with us at our T.A.B. Tuesday Afternoon Bash Saturday and Sunday Liquor Bust 4-7pm $5 All the Well You Can Drink ThUES. Jockey Short Contest M. C. The Everpresent Maude $100 in Prizes Showtime 10:00 16 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 10, 1987 Americans Make a Deal With an Apology Commen tary by Anne Saker WASHINGTON (UPI)- Americans find apology the most difficult of com­munication because making excuses is the second most important feature of capitalism and forgiveness is not an American trait. In business, in politics, even in religion-as the current jihad among televangelists demonstrates­apologies become currency, barter for a better deal: I'll say I'm sorry if you promise 1) not to sue; 2) to vote for me; 3) to keep sending those love offerings. The nation has been enured to the deal-making and because apologies are so expensive, Americans usually will forgo them because they don't want to pay the price, even for the satisfaction of hearing somebody say, "I'm sorry." The Pilgrims, full of divine fire, landed on the New World's rocky shores utterly certain of their Providential deed of trust. Such absolute purpose was born from the belief that Old World was warring, oppressive and bloody because it was constantly apologizing to heaven for its morass of human frailty and suf­fering. The American nation, however, was founded on the tenet that believers could have a wholly correct and unerring contract with God-a belief that has not changed radically in tenor since William Bradford wrote to his spiritual cousins in Europe that deliver­ance was available very nearly as simply as arriving in the New World. Apologies were unnecessary when godly people were carvingouta city on a hill from a untractablewilderness. That article of faith got the Pilgrims through hellish winters, and though by time alone made slightly more complex, that belief rules American life now. A magazine cover story recently wailed at the decline and fall of can-do American service. A cheery smile or a cordial offer of help costs extra as ser­vice submits to the service industry. A plane is a hour late for takeoff because a rear door cannot be closed. No one says, "Sorry for the delay, folks." Instead, the pilot blames FAA regula­tions, which apparently require that all airplane doors be closed while in flight. Politically, apologies force reassess­ment of motivations and goals, some­thing to be fervently avoided. Those who wait, candle in window, to hear from Nixon or Reagan in this regard keep a lonely vigil. As a signal demon­stration of American political wea­kness, an apology is tops. Say anything else communism had to be stopped, future presidents needed protection, mistakes were made but for an Ameri­can politician, apologies are anathema. The squabbling among the television preachers offers the most intriguing current study of apologies. The Rev. Jim Bakker's confession of infidelity seemed at first a bracing display of humility from a person who makes a fine living telling people to make right with God. Only a few days passed before his act of contrition took on the unappealing taint, in the current argot, of the "poison The Best Little Guest House in Town Reasonable Nightly & Weekly Rates Private Baths Free Parking For Reservations Call (504) 566-1177 1118 Ursulines, New Orleans, LA 70116 pill"-an action to fend off a hostile takeover. To extend the metaphor, the Rev. Jerry Falwell rode in as Bakker's "white knight" to save the PTL Club, adding a delicious little twist for those who have watched Falwell's career with perverse fascination. In America, apologies are a means to a foreseeable and attainable end, as much of the fabric of commerce and politics as money. Forgiveness, as a result, is drawn into the exchange as a matter of trade. Simply saying 'Tm sorry" with no strings attached is a sin­gular act of humanity, a gift from one spirit to another and, apparently, becoming rarer by the day. STERLING Paint and Body Centel'8 1107-D Upland Dr. Just N.W. of Katy Frwy & Wllcrest From Minor Dents to Major Restorations Financing Available 932-9401 Open 24 Hours Phone for Appts. between 9am-6pm Introducing ... The Kroger Pharmacy Prescription savings card Bring your prescription Savings Card to the Kroger Pharmacy each time you have a prescrip­tion filled and save: • '3.00 off the 1st and 11th prescription filled and • • 1.00 off on all the prescriptions filled in between •'15 Total Savings APRIL 10, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 FEIFFER® 18 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 10, 1987 Planned Parenthood Director Threatened With Ex-Communication • SAN ANGELO, Texas (UPI)-Despite threats of excommunication, a Roman Catholic director of Planned Parent­hood said he will continue to promote the use of condoms to stop the spread of AIDS. 'Tm in a lot of hot water with the Catholic church," said Jim Ferels, city Planned Parenthood executive director- Ferels responded Wednesday to an article by Bishop Michael Pfiefer that appeared last month in the San Angelo Standard-Times. Pfiefer had denounced the advertisement of condoms on televi­sion. "I wrote a very non-threatening arti­cle responding to Bishop Pfiefer because I was disturbed by his lack of concern about AIDS," said Ferels, who formerly was director of the San Fran­cisco AIDS Foundation. "The article is really concerned with the transmission of AIDS and the use of condoms to assist in defeating the disease." In the article, Ferels said he was writ­ing not only as a Planned Parenthood representative but as a practicing Catholic. Ferels and other parishioners of Holy Angels Catholic Church received a let­ter Monday from the bishop and parish priests stating opposition to Ferels' views on contraception and AIDS. Ferels met Tuesday with the priests at Holy Angels. "What I was told was that as a Catholic, I did not have the right to express my written or spoken opinion, because when one is Catholic, one sacri-fices certain things in this case my free­dom of expression," he said. "They talked to me about my attempts to diminish the threats of AIDS and I was told they were in con­tradiction to the bishop's teachings and that there is no room for controversy. "They indicated to me if I could not be silent and step down as director of Planned Parenthood, I would in fact be excommunicated, could no longer call myself Catholic, take the sacraments or attend church," he said. The Rev. Serran Braun, Holy Angels pastor, said Ferels, as a practicing Catholic and member of his congrega­tion, is representing the Catholic church when he presents his views. "We indicated that as a practicing member of the Catholic church, he either accepts all teachings of the church, (or) if he is non-practicing, he can reject some or all," Braun said. "If the church feels the need to excom­municate me because of my views, the ball is in their court," said Ferels, who plans to continue airing his opinion. Ferels would not be the first Planned Parenthood official to be excommuni­cated over his views. Officials of the Roman Catholic dio­cese of Providence, R.I., last January announced that it had excommunicated Mary Ann Sorrentino, the director of the Rhode Island Planned Parenthood affiliate. In another incident last year, church officials in Toledo told the Catholic assistant director of a women's clinic Another DvUj S~A Enterprise ... K.J.' s ~~ NORTHSIDE Mon-Fri Happy Hour 12-7pm s1so Well & 51 Beer Friday-No Cover-Party, Party Party Saturday-Cash Drawing SUNDAY Lip Synch Contest 10pm, Anyone Can Enter, Cash Prizes MONDAY Airline Night- 51 Bar Drinks and Beer for Airline Employees Tuesday-Pool Tournament 8pm $4 Entry Fee Wednesday-All Night Happy Hour 5150 Well & 51 Draft WELCOME KIEDREN (FORMERLY OF CHEERS) TO OUR STAFF Come by and see our New Look' 11830 AIRLINE-445-5849 (2 blocks south of Aldine-Bender) that performs abortions that her 11- year-old daughter would not be allowed to continue going to the parochial school she attended because of her mother's views. Planned Parenthood has long been a target of the Catholic Church, not only because of its position on abortion but also because its clinics offer birth con­trol information and dispense contraceptives-both of which the church staunchly opposes. Mexico Plans AIDS Program MEXICO CITY (UPI)-Health Minister Guillermo Soberon announced Satur­day Mexico would begin a program aimed at controlling the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome. The program, to begin at the end of the month, will be run jointly with the World Health Organization and will concentrate on testing people consi­dered to be at high risk of infection, Soberon said. The program will include tighter con­trols on blood banks to stem the spread of AIDS through blood transfusions, Soberon said. The Health Ministry has reported 340 AIDS cases and said half the patients have already died. Some private experts suspect the number of unreported cases to be at least twice as great as the known cases. COMEDY WORKSHOP 2105 SAN FELIPE HOUSTON. TX 77019 (713) 524-7333 presents a special engagement with comedienne Judy Tenuta April 21st 8:30pm benefilting the AIDS Foundation Tickets $10 with Champagne Reception after the Show For Reservations • lntonnatlon <?all Comedy Workshop at 524-7333 Other pertonnances will be April 22-26 Rendezvous Club (The Old Boobie Rock) Tel. 527-8619 1100 Westheimer Monday-Saturday 9am-5am Sunday 3pm-5am Monday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 2pm-9pm Tuesday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 2pm-9pm Wednesday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 9pm-12 midnight Thursday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 2pm-9pm 6rt,.o., • Friday & Saturday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 9pm-12 midnight Disco Beats of George from early hours and after hours til dawn! Sunday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 3pm-9pm After Hours Every Night Dance until Dawn Daily APRIL 10, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 Spalding Gray Dives Into 'Canibodia' Houston Screens by Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice It's easy to describe Swimming to Cam­bodia. The difficulty comes in catching the spirit of the piece. Essentially, a man who played a small role in The Killing Fields sits behind a desk and tells us about his experiences with and around the fi lm. This may not sound too exciting to most of us, but people who loved My Dinner with Andre might be salivating already. This is, however, a movie of style and substance. Some may have seen Spalding Gray in person. He has performed in Hous­ton. Before becoming Spalding Gray, the performance artist, he worked for a year at the Alley. More recently, he has been back in his present unique style, even with the two evening monologue from which this movie is condensed. Why didn't somebody drag me to this man's shows before? It's not the kind of thing I would have willingly chosen for myself. I even resisted The Gods Must poetry. There are three stories in this film. The tale of how he got the job in Killing Fields is engrossing, but it is the least interesting of the three. He also searches for that "perfect moment" that sums up and yet transcends the entire experience of his trip. Following his "dark angel," he has several near misses, but finally finds it. It is exhiler­ating and spooky all at once. Some of the most powerful moments come not from his personal experiences but from what he has found out about the bombing of Cambodia. He tells about it from the point of view of the Cambodians. It becomes a harrowing but inspiring vision worthy to stand beside Goliad and the Alamo. Heroes for freedom and enlightenment take a brave stand which is doomed to failure when they are abandoned by the United States. This is not quite like Gray's stage show. Besides being condensed, director Jonathan Demme has opened it up just Ann Magnuson and John Malkovich in "Making Mr. Right" Be Crazy. This man is, at times, delight­fully funny, eerily menacing, regret­fu 11 y r u eful , heart-warmi n g ly philosophical-a really great raconteur. Or, as he calls himself, a "poetic repor-a li ttle and done some very interesting things with camera angles. Laurie And­erson underpinned it with an evocative score, too. The fi lm is 87 minutes long. It felt like Todd (John Dye, left) relentlessly hounds Brett (Steve Lyon) to convince him to pose for Todd's all-male student pin-up calendar in "Campus Man" ter." His imagery-the way he bounces words off one another, the way he plays with the sounds of the language, his imitations of people (accents, facial expressions, philosophies)-really a re a little over a half hour. This show is obviously not for eve­ryone, but it is for a lot more than many might think. If you're on the fence about going, let me push you into it. It's not only worthy, it's fun! Spalding Gray talks about war in "Swimming to Cambodia" o Film Clips The Houston International Film Festi­val, opening April 16, will feature a major retrospective of the works by director John Huston, including a per­sonal appearance by this famed director of Key Largo, African Queen, and Moby Dick. The Rice Media Center is hosting a festival of post-wave Canadian cinema this week, April 11-13. o Curtain Up Aristocats-reissue of the Walt Disney animated feature. Athens, Ga/ Inside-Out (River Oaks, 10 & 11)-rock with R.E.M. and the B- 52's Campus Man-the making of a male pin-up calendar. Dr. Strangelove (River Oaks, 15 & 16) Making Mr. Right-Susan Speidel­man (Desperately Seeking Susan) directed this reverse Pygmalian, with a female image consultant hired to humanize a handsome android. Partisans of Vilna (Greenway III) Raising Arizona-an "adopted" baby gets kidnapped by someone else. The Best of Jay Ward (River Oaks, 12-14) The Secret of Success Three for the Road-Charlie Sheen Swimming to Cambodia (Belair, 10) o One Night Stands L'Armata Brancaleone (MFA, 10)­Brancaleone's Army Man of Aran; How the Myth Was Made (Rice Media Center, 10) Memoirs; Mother's Meat and Freud's Flesh (Rice MC, 10)-the punk side of Montreal; "A young porno film actor can't get physical with women because he associates all of them with this mother. His psychiatrist attempts to hypnotize Mom into thinking she's a man so that the actor will give up men." Per Grazia Ricevuta (MFA, 11)­Between Miracles C'est Comme Une Peine D'Arnore (Rice MC, 12, 2:00 p.m.)-an attempt at an emotional, non-political, non­moralistic view of abortion Divorzio All'Italiana (MFA, 12)­Divorce Italian Style Next of King; Low Visibility (Rice MC, 12) Crime Wave; Scissere (Rice MC, 13) The Photographer; The Photo­graphers (Houston Center for Photo­graphy, 14)-profiles of six photographers, the major focus being Edward Weston Walkman Blues (Goethe Institute, 16)-Alfred Behrens will be on hand to introduce his first feature-length film. Freebies. Ester Vargas, E.J. Sullivan and Demitrios Estdelacropolis are featured in "Mother's Meat and Freud's Flesh," playing at Rice Media Center April 10 20 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 10, 1987 Coalition Wants to Halt Constitutional Convention HOUSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA AUSTIN (UP I}-A rare coalition of lib­erals and conservatives is urging the Texas Legislature to lead the way in stopping a federal constitutional con­vention that is only two states short of approval. The group, which includes People for the American Way and Phyllis Schla­fly's Eagle Forum, said March 26 it wants the Legislature to withdraw a 1977 petition for a constitutional con­vention on a balanced budget amend­ment. Rep. Clint Hackney, D-Houston, has filed in the Texas House a resolution that would cancel the state's petition for the nation's first constitutional conven­tion in 200 years. Thirty-two states have passed resolu­tions calling for Congress to convene a constitutional convention, and only two more are needed before it must act. A similar resolution has passed the Nev­ada House and was scheduled for debate in the Senate. "My main concern is that the very foundation of this country could be undermined by opening up the constitu­tion for amendments in an open conven­tion," Hackney said. The lawmaker said there is no histori­cal or legal precedent for a convention open to only one subject. Arthur Kroop, executive director for People for the American Way, an anti­censorship group, told a news confer­ence the nation is at "the brink of a constitutional crisis." "Mrs. Schlafly's help in trying to stave off attempts to caJI a constitu­tional convention shows the great broad base of support for our efforts," he said. "Together, we ask Texas to lead the nation and withdraw its resolution calling for a constitutional conven­tion." Kroop said many state legislatures apparently did not understand what they were doing when they adopted the resolutions. "Perhaps these states' public officials used the resolutions to send a political message to Washington to get its fiscal house in order," he said. "And perhaps they saw little chance of a convention actually being called." Mike Hudson, Texas director of Peo­ple for the American Way, called the proposed convention "a bad idea whose IN INTERNATIONAL MILITARY FASHIONS FRENCH* GERMAN"' ITALIAN * wwn VINTAGE * COME clJ@;(l~ THE FASHION ARMY AT •...• f/1 ViLROY'S " ~rx ,w-9-- INTERNATIONAL MILITARY SURPLUS HDQRS. MON·· SAT 11·6 5 28 -2111 §AME DAY TYPE- § ETTER§ A NJ<~W D IV IRION OF T H E MON T ROSE VOICE We'll typeset your Flyers, Menus, Business Cards, Letterheads, Resumes, Brochures, Forms, Ads­and hundreds of other items­the Same Day (Sometimes You Just Want It Right Now!) Get it to us by Noon (or call for a pickup by 11am) and we'll have it ready by Spm (size of the job permitting) NO MINIMUM TIME LIMIT! If your typesetting really only takes 10 minutes, you'll only be charged for 10 minutes) 81TVPESTVLES TO CHOOSE FROM Pick Up and Delivery Available ($5 charge) 408 AVONDALE - 529-8490 time has come and gone." The resolution adopted by the Texas Legislature in 1977 caJis for Congress propose for state ratification a balanced budget amendment or call a constitu­tional convention. The House adopted the resolution on May 23, 1977 without a record vote, and the Senate adopted it a week later on a 25-6 vote. Call 529-8490 and You will be in Next Week's Newspaper of Montrose $*********************** : Privacy-Security : • • .i * £ ~ . : : : North Star : : Fence Co. i ! Free Estimates ! : 7 Days a Week • • Cedar-Gates Repaired ! : Wrought Iron-Chain Link : • • : 694-9113 t : Free Walkgate with this Ad : ***********************• SERGIU COMISSIONA M US I C DI R EC T OR MURRAY PERAHIA! Serglu Comlsslona, Conducting Murray Perahla, Pianist Chopin: Plano Concerto No. 2 Schumann: Spring Symphony Wagner: Parsifal Prelude Carter: Fanfare, Celebration of Some 100x150 Noles Fri., Apr. 10, Noon-1p.m. open rehearsal Fri., Apr. 10, 7p.m. Sat., Apr. 11, 8p.m. Classic Singles party after fhe concert sponsored by Joy 95 Sun., Apr. 12, 2:30p.m. pre-concert lectures: Fri. 6:10p.m. Sat. 7:30p.m Sun. 1:40p.m. CALL 227-ARTS Tickets start at $6.00. Charge tickets by phone or buy tickets at the Houston Ticket Center, lower level Jones Hall or Tlcketron outlets or all Foley stores 0 ~,?~T-~~~"!:AL "'• "'·"< \, ......... ,, 0. ........ WE WANTVOU! ct w > UNIFORM PARTY *12 APR.87 :1700HR.* VENTURE-N • 2923 MAIN STREET· HOUSTON APRIL 10, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 Nobody Does April Like Us in Montrose "Soap" by the staff of the Montrose Voice It's April in Montrose and a bevy of activity has folks up in a frenzy. As we approach mid-month (full moon is Mon· day the 13th), there are many activities still in the works to round out this excit· ing time in the neighborhood. So here are a few notes: o On the Rocks The Ranch's anniversary celebration is set for Su"nday, April 26. Free well drinks will be served from 2:00-4:00 p.m. A lone dollar gets a well drink or long neck all night. Mary's now has morning madness specials with Maria and B.J. The daily soiree has been deemed L'eggs over Easy and features $1 Bloody Maria's and screwdrivers. Rick Clyne's pool tournaments con· tinue at Mary's with sign up at 2:30 un Sunday and 7:30 Thursday. If you can't find Dickie or Fanny at Mary's, look around Outback. That is the name of the newly-fenced vacant lot. Seems that Bubba of the Venture-N celebrated so much Wednesday he did hand stands on his bicycle. Attention! Sunday at 1700 hours is time to report for another uniform party at the Main Street headquarters-the Venture-N. On a personal note, Kenny R. needs to train his dog not to bite the hand that feeds it. We hope the dog lived after its alcohol breakfast. o Mark that Calendar White Star Line announces an evening cruise on Tuesday, April 14. It will be a "Night to Remember." The Gay and Lesbian Hispanic Uni· dos will be having a "Fiesta de Leshia· nas" to benefit the Lesbiana Latina Retreat. The fundraiser will be held at "Just" Marion and Lynn's, 903 Rich· mond, Sunday, April 12 beginning at 3:00 p.m. There will be a Celebration VI Parade Party host meeting Sunday, April 12, at 1:00 p.m. For more info: 526-4942. You, too, can be a host. An all women's formal debutante ball benefitting Womynspace is slated for Saturday, April 18 at the Magnolia Ball· room, 715 Franklin. Billed as "a coming out extravaganza," it begins at 8:00 p.m. Tickets are $13 in advance and $15 at the door. Cherry Wolf will deejay and a cash bar will be available. A photo· grapher will be on hand for prom pie· tu res. April 24 is the deadline to sign up for the Greater Montrose Business Guild "Greater Montrose Garage Sale." Booth fee is $6 which includes pre-sale promo· tion. Info: 528-0443. John of Cousins celebrated his birthday last week so much he couldn't make it to work on Monday! o Just a Reminder Not to put a damper on anyone's good times, but with all the special parties Community News from Neighborhood & Community Groups .. GLSA Car Wash The Gay/ Lesbian Student Association of the University of Houston will hold a car wash on Saturday, April 11, in the parking lot adjacent to Mary's, 11 :00 a.m.-dusk. .. Easter Services at Kingdom Community Maundy Thursday Services will be held at Kingdom Community Church on April 16, beginning at 7:15 p.m. Easter breakfast will begin at 8:30 a.m. April 19, followed by Easter worship at 11 :00 a.m. KCC is located at 614 E 19th. Neighborhood Sports Sports News from Montrose & Community Groups .. Hadnot & Bell Win No. 1 Doubles Rank In recent Houston Tennis Club challenge ladder matches, Rick Hadnot and Ron Bell took over the No. 1 doubles ranking with a 4-6, 6-3, 6-2 win over Mark McMahon and Mike Houston. Another new team got on the doubles ladder as Shawn Paulk teamed with No. 1 singles player Andy M. to take over the No. 4 rank over Bruce Willis and Maddie 2-6, 6-0, 6-2 to hold onto his No. 10 rank. Thia Sunday HTC is hosting a women's tournament for the Virginia Slims tickets. Entry fee of $4 gets the ladies into a fun singles round robin event on the Memorial Park Tennis Courts. Other club members and guests will play as usual on other courts 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. For Information about playing in the women's tournament, call Dimples at 523-2836 or Rachel at 524-2151. Enjoying good weather and good times at the vacant lot festival slated for the coming weeks this may be a good time for a few special reminders. The new drunk driving laws are very strict and public intoxication arrests in this neighborhood have always netted the city some extra revenue. The men in blue in Montrose and judges in black downtown aren't playing. It's wise when going out for the evening to tuck away a few bucks for a safe taxi ride home. A D.W.I. or P.I. costs a lot more than a couple of cocktails. Also, always remember to play safe. Mac, left, and Jerry, right, relaxing after a hard days work at Classic Designs Congratulations to R.C. Cuellar, first place winner in wild cow riding at the Golden State Gay Rodeo BE FAMOUS. BE SEEN ADVERTISE IN THE MONTROSE VOICE. Al's Insurance Service 4108 Fannin Houston, Texas 77004 (713) 529-0140 AUTO LIABILITY SR-22 FILINGS YOUNG DRIVERS LOW DOWN PAYMENTS LIFE COMMERCIAL AUTO BONDS PROPERTY HOMEOWNERS NOTARY SERVICE 22 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 10, 1987 Gay and lesbian reading =============from============= A·L·Y·S·O·N PUBLICATIONS LOVE SEX ____ ..... _ LOVESEX: The horny relationship chronicles of Max Exander, by Max Ex­ander, $7.00. Exander gives a vivid description of his personal six-month odyssey toward establishing a lasting gay relationship which incorporates safer sex. SECRET DANGERS, by John Preston, $5.00. In this lacest installment of the Alex Kane series, ex-marine Kane and his young partner, Danny Fortelli, battle a world-wide terrorist ring that is using violence against gays to promote its own ends BELDON'S CRIMES, by Robert Rein­hart, $7.00. A grisly sex murder and a homophobic job dismissal suddenly turn Dave Beldon's life upside-down. When he decides to fight for his rights, he becomes the country's most recognized gay man. But soon the question arises: Will Dave Beldon ultimately be the vic­tor - or victim of the three-ring media circus that surrounds him? A new and original novel from the author of A History of Shadows. "Now for my next trick ... " NOW FOR MY NEXT TRICK ... , by Michael Willhoite, $5.00. Michael Will­hoite's cartoons have been entertaining readers of The Washington Blade for many years. Now, some 80 of his best cartoons have been collected into this book. EIGHT DAYS A WEEK, by Larry Duplechan, $ 7. 00. Johnnie Ray Rousseau is a 22-year-old black gay pop singer whose day starts at 11 pm. Keith Keller is a white banker with a 10 o'clock bedtime - and muscles to die for. This story of their love affair is one of the most engrossing - and funniest - you'll ever read. MEDITERRANEO, by Tony Patrioli, $12.50. Through some 46 photos, Italian photographer Tony Patrioli explores the homo-erotic territory in which, since the beginning of time, adolescent boys have discovered sex. jOversize paperbackl THE MOVIE LOVER, by Richard Friedel, $7.00. Burton Raider's problems begin in high school when he realizes he's in love with his friend Roman. As he gets older, the problems increase - and so does the humor of his situation, in what Chris­topher Street calls "the funniest gay novel of the year." QUATREFOIL, by James Barr, $8.00. The year is 1946, and Philip Froelich faces a court martial for acting insubor­dinate to a lazy officer during the closing days of World War II. Then he meets Tim Danelaw, and soon the court mar­tial is among the least of Phillip's con­cerns .... This classic novel, first published in 1950, remains a romantic and suspense­ful read, an intelligently-written love story that gives a vivid picture of our re­cent but often-forgotten past. SECOND CHANCES, by Florine de Veer, $7.00. Is it always harder to accept what is offered freely? Jeremy, young and still naive about the gay world, could easily have the love of his devoted friend Roy, yet instead he finds himself pursu­ing the handsome and unpredictable Mark. Long Time Passblg: Lives 01 Oleler LeSlllans -·''"-""" ... LONG TIME PASSING: Lives -;;(older Lesbians, edited by Marcy Adelman, $8.00. In their own words, women talk about age-related concerns: the fear of losing a lover; the experiences of being a lesbian in the 1940s and 1950s; and issues of loneliness and community. ACT WELL YOUR PART, by Don Sakers, $5.00. When Keith Graff moves with his mother to a new town, he feels like the new kid who doesn't fit in. Then he joins his high school's drama club and meets the boyishly cute Bran Daven­port ... REFLECTIONS OF A ROCK LOBSTER: A story about growing up gay, by Aaron Fricke, $5.00. The moving auto­biography of Aaron Fricke, who made na­tional news when he took a gay date to his high school prom. SEX POSITIVE, by Larry Uhrig, $7.00. Many religious leaders have distorted Biblical passages to condemn homosex­uality. Here Uhrig fights back, discuss­ing positive Biblical views of same-sex relationships, and arguing that sexuality and spirituality arc closely linked. THE SPARTAN, by Don Harrison, $6.00. In the days of the first Olympics, gay relationships were a common and valued part of life. The Spartan tells the story of a young athlete and his adven­tures in love and war, providing a vivid picture of classical Greece, the early Olympics, and an important part of our history. A BLACK GAY ANTHOLOGY Il\' THE LIFE ,..... IN THE LIFE: A black gay anthology, edited by Joseph Beam, $8.00. When Joseph Beam became frustrated that so little gay male literature spoke to him as a black gay man, he decided to do some­thing about it. The result is this an­thology, in which 29 contributors, through stories, essays, verse and art­work, have made heard the voice of a too-often silent minority. THE MEN WITH THE PINK TRIANGLE, by Heinz Heger, $6.00. Thousands of gays were thrown into Nazi concentration camps for the crime of homosexuality. Heinz Heger is the only one ever to have told his story. Here is a chilling recollection of one of the most frightening chapters of our gay past. WORLDS APART, edited by Camilla Decamin, Eric Garber and Lyn Paleo, $8.00. These collected science fiction stories present a wide array of imagina­tive characters, from a black lesbian vampire to a gay psychodroid. Here is adventure, romance, and excitement - and perhaps some genuine alternatives for our future. ------TO ORDER----- 1 I I I I Enclosed is $ __ . Please send the books I've listed below. (Add $1.00 postage when order­ing just one book; if you order more than one we'll pay postage.) Visa and Mastercard accepted; enclose acct. no., exp. date, and signature. Send me these books: name ----------- address ---------- city ___________ _ I state __ zip ______ _ I ALYSON PUBLICATIONS I Dept. P-5 I 40 Plympton St. I Boston, MA 02118 L---------------- APRIL 10, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 <l\, \CAA SEE~ /lU. mtr --·HE .lUSl' PtO<a> ~ YN> sror T' ~NT~ Mt··· The Yellow- Man's Burden The Innocent Bystander By Arthur Hoppe I had read nervously about the fall of the once-mighty dollar, but nothing had prepared me for the arrival of Mr. Yutaka Hibachi at my door. Mind you, he was polite and outwardly consider­ate as he introduced himself to me and handed me his card. What alarmed me was the announced purpose of his visit. "I wish to buy your house," he said with a little smile and a small bow. I was about to tell him, in the interests of inter n ational friendship, to get lost. But several recent experiences stayed my tongue. One was the way the edge of my paint scraper disappeared into the window sill in the bathroom last Sunday; another was the growing brown stain in the bedroom ceiling which has been much on my mind lately; and third was a sma ll noise I heard coming from the floor joists under the living room the other night: it sounded like chewing. "Come right in, Mr. Hibachi," I said. (What did I care about international friendship?) "You're planning on mov· ing here to live?" "Live?" he said, looking surprised. "Here? In this house? Oh, no, I am doing very well with my company in Tokyo, thank you. But my wife thought it would be nice to have a little rustic retreat. Some place to get away from the hustle and bustle of modern life." "Oh," I said. "Well, we are a couple of minutes away from downtown. But, look, it's only two bedrooms and a breakfast nook. It's not very big." "Yes," he agreed, "that's why we're buying the block. Tell me, would those interesting- ah- furnishings be included?" "I suppose I could let you have the tee-vee, the stereo and the VCR." I said. "Ah , yes," he said. "Do you have any­thing that is not Japanese?" "Oh, sure," I said, picking up a tea cozy my Aunt Cora had knitted. "There's this." You would've thought I'd offered him the Saudi crown jewels, the way his eyes lit up. "An authentic native handi­craft!" he exclaimed, holding it up to the ligh t. "How much are you asking for this indigenous treasure?" "Well," I said, "I happen to know she could use $10 to buy into tonight's Dou­ble Keno Game at St. J ude's." "Ten dollars?" said Mr. Hibachi. "How much is that in real money?" He punched his wrist calculator. "Why, that's less that 1500 yen!" he said incredulously. "How many of these can this Aunt Cora turn out a day?" "Oh, maybe one a week," I said "More if there's something good on tee-vee." His shoulders sagged. "It's the poor working conditions and lack of technol­ogy that keep you Americans from reaching the economic takeoff point," he said. " It's no wonder you're a debtor na tion, fo rced to buy your necessities from the advanced industrial powers." "Now, wait a minute," I said. "Please," he said, holding up his hand, " I happen to admire the way you easygoing Americans drift through life as though you didn't have a care in the world. We hardworking, ambitious overachievers could learn a lot from you." "Hold on there." I said. "Meanwhile, we'll get you the techni­cal help you need to make something of yourselves, like an automated, digitally calibrated knitting machine for your Aunt Cora. Itis thedutyofus technolog­ically advanced societies to assist you underdeveloped people in pulling your­self up by your own bootstraps so that you may become our equal trading partners. Someday." That did it. The heck with interna­tional friendship. I did what any venge­ful victim of economic colonialism would do: I sold him my house. 1987 (S.F.) Chronicle Publishing Co Call 529-8490 and You will be in Next Week's Newspaper of Montrose !PATIO SEATINGPL;NTYPARKING PATiO SEATiNG PLENTY PARKING PATIOSEATI i' I :1~· ·_\\UNGR}'• ~y !n~!io~rm~i~~~ ~: :.. • ~- regular price and gel lhe ~ I> ~-.:..;.. ,._ ··~.._ second olem ol equal or less -g I ~ 'r · · · -- 0• value free. Dine-in only. > I w • IEU y."ltd • Present coupon when ordering. ~I I~ INTERNATIONAL CUISINE SAVE UPTO $7.95 ~I I ~ • Gyros • Pasta • Grilled Chicken Breast EXPIRES MAY 1 1987 i:i I- • Chicken Fried Steak • Hoagie and Pita 011 ' ~I I lolcl( • Sandwiches • Salads • Sou ps • Burgers "good MON.,RI ' ""' >•M ..,. •"•••SAT • - SUN 0 I:o: ~,..I, I~ HUNGRY INTERNATIONAL PRESENTS 2356 Rice g I ~ Llve Music and Magic Blvd. ~I ~ by Carl Shaer <1 " •h• vm•g•> i;;1 I ~ 523-s5s2 ~I D.. Thun. 6:30-9:30pm NOW OPEN < I~ Fri. and Sat. 7-lOpm -g Z FREE FREE Lunch or Dinner ?:;I I~ Delivery (S10.00 minimum) (with coupon & pu rchase) ~ a! ~ 0,!!lf'L?N~l:I~ A,;!;_NU,d :2!'1~3~1;!;:!d .2,N'~".if~3"J! ~,!ii.L~S ,2!.L~ ~I Fortunes Competent is the Word for Capricorns By Mark Orlon Your Horoscope from the Voice For Fnday evenmg. Apfll 10, through Friday mornmg, Apfll 16. 1987 ARIES-While this may not be the dark night of the soul, it's no bed of roses either. It isn't really that things are so bad, more that you have some important and difficult decisions to make when you'd rather go out and play. Sorry, Aries. Take care of buiness. TAURUS-An ability to laugh at your­self and see the humor in your ways can be a valuable asset. You won't be doing things much differently, but you' ll be able to stand back and at least giggle. Mean­while, your plans and schemes aretaking nice shape. GEMINI-Have you learned to go with the flow yet? If so. you're swimming in some fine waters this time. If not, you may be in over your head. "Go with the flow" doesn't mean the same thing as getting carried away. The surface may be calm, but there are rip-tides and crosscurrents. CANCER-You can learn a lot about yourself Your ability to stick with it and plan through may surprise you and impress others. Even if you always thought you could, really doing it is another thing. Congratulations. Keep on keeping on LEO-Everyone should have a Leo for a partner right now. You've got thekind of mind and energy that knows how to give anyone the best. The danger is that you may want to give everyone your best. One at a time, please, one at a time. VIRGO- In thinking about your plan­ning for the future. don't forget what the present requires of you. Someone close may be upset with a space case of a mate if you do. You're "there," but where else are you? Don't be isolated in dreamland. LIBRA-You were almost too hot for words last time• Now that you've cooled down a bit, merely glowing warmly, why not bring your friends together for some entertainment? Spring·s here, and if anyone knows how to celebrate its plea­sures. you do. ~~~~~~~~~~ SCORPIO-While everyone else is planning vacations and trips, you'll be more than satisfied to stay home. In your unusual calm and peacefulness, small everyday things will give you great plea­sure and joy. Stop to smell the roses! SAGITTARIUS- You can give your best to the group now. Whether it's fam­ily, friends, business associates or an organization you're part of, you can do a lot for everyone involved. Your lack of selfishness and desire to give makes you extremely attrative. CAPRICORN-Competent is the word for Capricorns now. Calm, cool, and col­lected are others that describe the way you're feeling There's a nice give-and­take with lovers, and a better understand­ing with coworkers. It all adds up to a fortunate time AQUARIUS- In the serarch for that perfect lover, you keep on running into yourself Self-discovery? While you learn some things you don't really want to know, in the long run you gain a lot. Becomming a bigger and better person isn't always easy. ~~~~~~~~~~ PISCES- The only thing that can stop you now are self doubt and self-imposed limitations that are no longer valid. Your drive and energy could take you into a whole new period of life and understand­ing. Don't stop yourself. Go with the mighty flow 24 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 10, 1987 'Grandpa Hasn't Moved' at Radio Music Theater Review by Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice o Radio Music Theater If you don't mind laughing (and I don't), Radio Music Theater is a very comforta­ble place to be. Currently, Grandpa Hasn't Moved in Days is playing there. RMT is a cozy little nightclub with tables. They have an efficient smoke eater but they don't allow smoking dur­ing the show. Alcohol (complimentary white wine) is only available at the Sat­urday late show. The performers are certifiably tal­ented, among other things. Their recent short (two nights?) engagement in NYC resulted in three offers to produce their show there. So we may be losing them next fall. They're proud to point out that they have homes and children here in Houston. They're not at all sure that the Big Apple will get them for more than six months at a time. scapes. Most of the people included in the pictures are incidental-to be over­looked or perceived as just one more ele­ment in the overall picture. However, there are some very telling portraits, such as the one of a couple manning an AIDS information booth in a park. Most of his compositions are geomet­rical, finding interesting angles and planes. It hints at an abstractionist influence. His skies are blue and sunny. An occa­sional study of lighting or a tornado are interesting standouts. And he shares my deep and abiding love for moun­tains. In fact, one mist-filled photo­graph lets Houston's own Penzoil building loom in the background like distant peaks. However, his recurring motif, the one that gives rise to the feeling of geometri­cal planes, is off-beat ground covers. There's a sloping California lawn full of· something pink. There's a desert lawn­alternating rows of low, hairy cacti and Vicki Farrell. Steve Farrell and Ken Polk of Radio Music Theater They also make comedy film shorts which are seen on "Saturday Night Live." Do you get the feeling that I laughed my head off and am having difficulty remembering any details? At intermis­sion, one person sitting near me thought that the three performers (Steve and Vicki Farrell and Ken Polk) had become a total of 12 characters. Another said it was 14. (Most of the recurring charac­ters that regulars love appear, except for Mack Sloan and the Old Dick.) We are in Dumpster, Texas. Grandpa Fertle, the wiener king, preacher and leader of the now disbanded famous gospel family group, has just passed on. It was his dying wish (wasn't it?) that the Singing Fertles be reborn, even though his son now wants them to switch to "secular" music. And his daughter Justicina (Polk) thinks of her­self as a very large Joan Baez. Well. there are marital spats and reconciliations and complications with a pregnancy and the simple son's reac­tions to his father's death. It all sounds very serious. The best comedy usually is. The second part of the second act is a concert. The music is delightful. (This group has actually put out a good LP.) Some of it is openly, downright hilar­ious. Some of it works very well as the kind of song it's intended, with close harmony and all. But there's always some kink to it that will draw a laugh right out of you. o Joel Sternfeld's Photography There's a major showing of Joel Stern­feld's photography at the Museum of Fine Arts. These are gorgeous land-tlagsumes. He often pulls the camera way hack til trees and even houses become ornamental ground cover them­selves. · You can't help but notice his bright, autumnal colors at the very first glance. As you progress through the works, you become aware that he has used some darkroom technique I won't pretend to understand. He achieves more vibrant hues without leaving behind attention to realism. Unfortunately, part way through the second room full, it just became too rich a pawtry. The aggre­gate just got to be a bit much. I think you'll really like these photos, if you only take them one room at a time. Thankfully, there are so many other things worth seeing at MFA that you can give yourself an enjoyable intermis­sion o Notes Hey, all you "stud puppets" and "pseudo virgins" out there! Judy Tenuta, queen of the sleazy prom and goddess of sorts, will be at the Comedy Workshop. Her opening night, April 21 , is a benefit for the AIDS Foundation. So get insulted for a good cause. You know I won't usually mention garage sales at all, but today and tomor­row at Clay and Main there's a garage sale covering an entire city block! And the proceeds benefit Houston's hungry, homeless and jobless. Chocolate Bayou has been able to extend the run of John Henry Faulk's one man show through April 18. The newly incorporated Houston Academy of Motion Pictures is having a screenwriting contest. Deadline for sce­narios is April 18. Call HAMP for detai lb. 54fi-96;l:l. The Plutonium Players' "Ladies Against Women" returns to Maceba Theater on April 11 Auditions: '87-'88, Kuumba House, April 13-14, by appointment only, 524- 1079. o Celebrate! Saturday, April 11, is my dearly beloved mother's 75th birthday. She lives in Colorado Springs and I will be there. April 20, 1956, Birmingham, Ala­bama. White racists took to the stage to beat up Nat King Kole while he was trying to perform. B'days: 10-Hans Licht, Clare Boothe Luce, Max von Sydow. 11-Paul Dou­glas, Joel Gray, Louise Lasser. 12- Da vid Cassidy, Lionel Hampton, Herbie Hancock. 13-Lanford Wilson, Lyle Waggoner, Ricky Shroder. 14- Julie Christie, Loretta Lynn, Sir John Gielgud. 15-Claudia Cardinale, Hans Murray Perahia, pianist (Jones, 10)­HSO Ernst Riejseger and Alan "Gunga" Purves (Diverse Works, 10)-cellist and drummer. ONO! Tibet: The Mystic Mountain Sanctu­ary (Museum of Natural Science, 10)­illustrated lecture by Harold A. Knutson. ONO! Wind Percussion Ensembles (HSPVA, 10)-0NO! Ladies Against Women (Maceba, 11)-"You're Nobody until you're Mrs. Somebody!" ONO! World of Beauty (Stages, 11)-Texas Playwrights Festival Very Special Arts Festival (Sam Houston Park, 12, 1-5)-for disabled children and adults to see and be artists. ONO! Vlado Perlemuter, pianist, performs at Heinen April IO and 11 Conreid, Elizabeth Montgomery. 16- Edie Adams, Herbie Mann, Peter Ustinov. "The human race's prospects of survi­val were considerably better when we were defmseless against tigers than they are today when we become defense­less against ourselves."-Arnold Toyn­bee (born April 14) o Openings Vlado Perlemuter, pianist (Heinen, 10 & 11) Feiffer's People (Company Onstage, 10) Duane Michals, photographer (Glas­sell, 12, 3:00 p.m.)-illustrated lecture about his own works. Freebies. ONO! Choir and Orchestra of St. John the Devine Episcopal (12, 4:00 p.m.)­Freebies. ONO! George Hunter Jazz Quintet (Tran­quility Park, 1:l, noon)-Freebies. ONO! Mark Anderson (Diverse Works, 14)­performanC'e art. ONO! ,James Mt'rrill (MFA, 14)-reading his own works. ONO! A Lie in the Mind (Alley, 16)-qy Sam Shepard Sounds of Gee (Jones Plaza, 16, noon)-Freehies. ONO! Court Upholds Enforcement of City's 'S.O.B.' Ordinance HOUSTON (UPl)-An appeals court has thrown out two court orders that allowed two topless bars to continue operating in violation of the city's sexu­ally oriented business ("S.O.B.") ordi­nance. The 14th Court of Appeals ruled April 2 that state District Judge Frank 0. White did not have the authority to grant temporary injuctions in December that prohibitied the city from enforcing the ordinance. The clubs do "not have a constitution­ally protected vested right to operate a sexually oriented business," the court stated. City Attorney Jerry Smith said the ruling was significant for the city's enforcement of the sexually oriented business ordinance. He said a ruling against the city could have stymied enforcement efforts in other cases. The clubs have continued to stay open without the required city permits or extentions. City Council adopted the ordinance in March 1986, requiring owners and oper­ators of sexually oriented businesses to obtain permits from the city. To obtain a permit, the business must meet certain requirements regulating location, signs and exterior painting. Lone Star Classic Draws Field of 18 Eighteen men's softball teams from six states have accepted invitations to play in the Fourth Lone Star Classic. Sponsored by the Montrose Softball League, the double elimination tourna­ment is scheduled for April 17-19 at Memorial Park. Teams from Los Angeles, San Fran­cisco, Dallas, Kansas City, Sacramento, Chicago and New York will join six Montrose Softball League teams in the competition. Teams signed up from Houston are Fitness Exchange, Galleon, Montrose Voice, Mecca, Montrose Mining Com­pany and Michaels. Play begins at 11:00 a.m. Friday, April 17, on Memorial Fields 2, 3, 4 and 5. Continuing Saturday at 10:00 a.m., play will be centered a round fields 4 and 5. Sunday will be reserved as a "rain date." Place a 'Personal Ad' in Next Week's Montrose Voice Seek a dale, an adventure, on encounter Send a message for all to see to someone you love Advertise your secret lantosy TO PIACE A 'PERSONAL' IN THE NEWSPAPER Of MONTROSE, JUST CALL 529-8490 APRIL 10, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 25 " WE MAY \.\AVE AN IMAGE PROBLEM! /1 Kemp Has Best Record on Women By Clay F. Richards UPI Political Writer WASHINGTON-Conservative Rep. Jack Kemp, R-N.Y., has the best record among likely Republican presidential candidates for giving women high­paying staff jobs, a study showed Thursday. The Republican task force of the National Women's Political Caucus sur­veyed nine potential candidates on issues important to women. One of the nine, evangelist Pat Robertson refused to divulge any infor­mation about the employment of women in his religious organizations. The report noted that Robertson was a violent opponent of the Equal Rights Amendment and abortion, and said extension of the Civil Rights Act was "one of the most frightening pieces of legislation that has been brought up." Among the others, the report noted that Kemp had 13 women and three men on his personal staff and all four top earners were women including his exec­utive assistant who earns $63,232. Kemp is an active opponent of abortion and the ERA. As for Howard Baker, while he was in the Senate, the majority of his staff were BETTER LAWilS & QARDEilS Total lawn maintenance Commercial~ Residential • Landscape • Trash Removal • Chimne4 Sweep • Tree Service • Stumps Removed • Complete Sprinkler Sqstems FREE ESTIMATES! BEST PRICES! 523-LAWN women, although they did not hold the highest paying jobs. The median male salary was $34,500, the median female salary $22,490. The report noted Baker supports women in politics, because his grand­mother was the first woman sheriff in Tennessee, his stepmother served in the House and his daughter ran for the House. The report said five of seven of Labor Secretary William Brock's immediate pesonal staff are women, the highest ranking woman holding the No. 2 slot. The male median salary on Brock's staff is $50,171, compared with $35,672 for women. Women also hold a number of top positions in the Labor Depart­ment including associate undersecre­tary. Vice President George Bush has three women on his immediate personal staff of 13, including the one in the third highest position. The male median salary is $68,920 comared with $53,758 for women. Senate Republican leader Robert Dole's staff includes 19 women and 11 men. The salary for females is $29,251 and for males, $45,672. When Dole was majority leader, his chief of staff was a woman. While he was governor of Delaware, Pierre duPont had a woman as secre­tary of the senate, chief clerk of the state house and state treasurer. However, the treasurer was paid only $25,700, while her male colleagues averaged $42,000. Sen. Nancy Kassebaum, R-Kan., has nine men and 30 women on her personal staff. The median male salary is $37,280, compared with $25,000 for women. Five women are included in the top 10 salaried positions . As for Jeane Kirkpatrick, of the three support persons currently working for the former UN ambassador, one is a male who is her executive assistant. Letters to the Voice From t he Readers of the Montrose Voice ~ Responding to Rep. Wright From Chris Kihnel. co-chairman, PWA Coalition-Houston In reference to Rep. Brad Wright's (A-Houston) comments Monday, March 23, regarding PWA's as having to take responsibility for contracting AIDS because of our illegal activities, the PWA Coalition-Houston regrets his short-sighted far r;ght, bureaucratic hypocrisy regarding our so-called responsibility and the state's responsibility ending after fully educating people. We commend Glen Maxey our lesbian-gay rights lobbyist for calling Wright "short­sighted." After all, AIDS has attacked not only the gay community but IV drug users, people that have acquired AIDS through blood transfusions, women with bi-sexual husbands or lovers, and the children. What about the children? We commend Texas Atty. Gen. Jim Mattox ruling on our rights to file job discrimination complaints if our employers fire us because of AIDS But at the same time we as PWA's prefer not to be called "victims" but as People with AIDS. I promise that we. the PWA Coalition of Houston, has only begun to voice our rights and opinions. We will fight for the rights of all PW A's and will become politically active with the help of our friends in the media. ~ Write the Voice Items in the "Letters" column are opinions of readers. Publication of such opinions does not infer a concurring view by the Voice. Readers are encouraged to submit their thoughts on issues of interest. Please keep letters brief and mail to "Letters to the Editor," Montrose Voice. 408 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006. All letters must be signed and include address and phone number to verify authenticity. Address and phone will not be printed Name will be withheld on request. 26 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 10, 1987 VOICE CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISING --PROVIDING A SERVICE? Keep it listed here in the Voice where liter­ally thousands turn each week TARGET YOUR MARKET A brochure. newsletter. promotion can h~p our business target your goals and reach your market Call 524-0409 ---VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Advertise your professional service through a Voice Classofoed Call 529-8490 Pay by check or charge 1t on your Ameri­can Express. Diner's Club. MasterCard, Visa or Carte Blanche Layout Design, Production Copy Specializing in Retail, Medical and Scientific Areas 523-5606 ANNOUNCEMENTS KELLY BRADLEY, M.B.S., R.N.C. REGISTERED NURSE CLINICIAN Individual. family and group practice limited to coping-stress. role relation­ships and self-concept intervention Office 623~625 LEGAL NOTICES The Voice. a general circulation news­paper having published continuously for over 5 years is qualified to accept legal notices ANSWERING SERVICES PAGE ME COMMUNICATIONS SYS­TEMS. 622-4240 SEE OUR OISPUY AO Answering Service One Month Free Computerized Service for your Personal Use. • No T efephone Service Required • P999 Me An'9ns Telephone Nos. • 24 Hour/ 7 Oay Service • Your Mess999s are Private e No UN Operato~ - No Mistakes- Ask About Free Trial Offer Call Jim at 622-4240 Page Me! Uectronie MeHage Center Otftce Hours: 10am-4pm Mon.-f rt. ANTIQUES 1948 BARBER CHAIR Art deco Koken-Barrrell 521-0518 OoEON GALLERY 2117 Dunlavy. 521- 1111 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO FlNDINGS. 2037 Norfolk 522-3662 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD YESTERDAY'S WORLD ANTIQUES. 1715 Westhe•mer. 526-2646 SEE Ot.JR DISPLAY AD f~~~.~~s~ . Antiques • Estate Sales conslgnmenh 2037 Norfolk .. ,_. .... MH~rd Md -..pl'MnU TUU.-T. 11_. 522-5662 ATTORNEY JAMES-D HESS.-3407 Montrose #205. 521-9216 PH.YLLIS FRYE-:-723-8368 General prac­tice of law ELAINE SHAW. 222-7-772. 645-3159 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD ELAINE SHAW Attorney at Law • DWI • Prostitution • Possession • Family Law • Accident 222-7772 or 645-3159 No•c.,1 by~• 6d 01Spec1a11z•t10n To advertise. call 529-8490 during business hours. AUTO REPAIR MONTROSE AUTO REPAIR. 2516 Genesee (1CXJ Pacific). 526-3723 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD SALVIN AUTOMOTIVE. 524-8219 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD STERLING PAINT & BODvCENTERS. 1107-D Upland Dr. 932-9401 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD TAFT AUTOMOTIVE. 1411 Taft. 522-2190 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO MONTROSE AUTO REPAIR Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed 2516 Genesee (100 Pacific) 526-3723 Carburetor Spec1olisl Electrical Reprnrs All Broke Work BARBER SHOPS. HAIR SALONS Dino's Barber Shop.302W 11th. Haircuts $6 up. 863-1520 for appointment To~my·s Barber ShOp. haircuts $10 and up 2154 Portsmouth Appointments 528- 8216 HAIRCUTS BY MIKE. 522-3003 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD JON BARTON. t515~ Dunlavy 522-7866 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD ·~ ~ SALON 1515~ Dunlavy 522-7866 Haircuts, etc. by Mike Shampoo Cut & Bl<-w D ry $i<I by Mike 522-3003 BARS Knew Mood Nu-bar Second drrnk com­plimentary with mention of this ad 1336 Westhe1mer 529-3332 GAY BARS The following list are only the gay bars which have placed a recent advertisement 1n the Voice. For information on these bars. please see their ads. For info.rmat1on on other bars (such as type of cllentele), call the Gay Switchboard at 529-3211 or see their ads in other pubhcat1ons COUSINS. 817 Fairview. 528-9204 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CAMP CLOSET. 109 Tuam. 528-9814 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CHUTES. 1732 Westhe1mer, 52J-2213- SfE OUR DISPLAY AD DIRTY SALL y·s. 220 Avondale. 529-7525 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD EISS. 2517 Ralph at Westhe1mer 527-9071 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD KSS. 11830 Airline:44S:.5849 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO MAiiY'$.lo22 Westhe1mer, s28-885 l SEE OUR DISPLAY AD MEN-EAGY. 911 WI r);e;;_ 522-7524' SEE OUR DISPLAY AD MICHAELS.428 west~ 529-2506 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD RENDEZVOUS. 1100 Westhe1mer, 527-8619 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD THE611. 611 Hyde. 528-9079 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD VENTURE-N. 2923 Mam. 522-0000 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO BONDSMAN A-QUICK BAIL BONDS Fast. courteous. discreet. all type of bonds made Michael E Standage. agent Mention the Voice for $25 off all qualifoed bonds 678-4488. 621-8452 BOOKKEEPING BOOKKEEPING SERVICE Personal, commercial. taxes 467-3871 BOOTS Oh Boy' Quality Boots. 912 Westhe1mer. 524-7859 CARS AND BIKES Be gay. Drive home a new Susuk1 Sama­rai Call Pat 641-8475 or Tom 641-8476 SELL YOUR CAR through a Montrose Voice classified ad Call 529-8490 STERLING Chaufler driven Rolls Royces avallable for all occasions or just for the fun of it. Call Ken at 932-9401 CHURCHES KINGDOM COMMUNITY CHURCH, 614 E 19th. 880-3527. 351-4217 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CEN_T.ERFOR A POSITIVE LIFESTYLE. 531-6600 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD Center for a Positive Lifestyle A 1.Li-.1n,g Mf"lAphy:;lnJ. !i:plrllu&I Cel PbraU >0 meet.s uowa..own l , ·Hctay Inn. 601 C&l~o every Mondty8pm ior more 1nfo. D1&l 497-PAAY Kin~dom Commumty Church Jom Our Family m 1987 614 E. 19th Sundays 11am 880-3527 or 351-4217 CLEANING SVCS SERVICE PLUS A Quality Cleaning Service Residential •Commercial e BONDED e Jeff Cunningham 522-3451 COFFEE COFFEE & TEA WORLD. 3939-R Montrose, 524-8536 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO Coffee & Tea World Gourmet Coffee • Fine Teas Accessories 3939-R Montrose Blvd. 713-524-8536 CONSIGNMENTS FINDINGS. 2037 Norfolk. 522-3662 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CONSTRUCTION. CONTRACTING HSK CONTRACTING 520· 9064 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD ALL AMERICAN CONSTRUCTION. - 827-1422 or 497-5228 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD COUNSELING DR. NICHOLAS EDD, 2128 Welch. 527-8680 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO DENTIST RONALD M BUTLER. D.D S., 427 Westhe1mer, 524-0538 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD RONALD A PETERS. DDS 620 W. Ala­bama 523-2211 Ronald M. Butler D.D.S. 427 Westhe1mer Houston. TX 770C'th Monday Ihm Sa1urdcw Hours by Appc11ntrrwn1 (713) 524-0538 DWELLINGS. ROOMMATES. HOUSES/APTS. FOR SALE. RENT. LEASE We5t Gray/ Montrose. large upstairs one bedroom with sun room/ study. 4-plex at 1126 W Gray Newly painted. hardwood floors, mini blinds, ceiling fans and off street parking $295/ mo. 526-0804 Two weeks free rent GARAGE APT. /STUDIO Near Heights. seven min_ to Montrose. spacious light, storage, washer/ dryer, fenced yard. dark room. $205 flex move­'" 524-1244 Montrose one bedroom apt~ ;mall quiet complex with pool. secunty gates. laundry fac1ht1es. cable available. Adults No pets $100 dep. $265 pluselectnc. 713- 529-8178 GREENWAY PLACE APARTMENTS. 3333 Cummins. 623-2034 SfE OUR DISPLAY AD - VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Rent that house or apartment through a Voice Classified Call 529-8490 And charge 1t on your American Express. Din­er's Club. Carte Blanche. MasterCard or Visa EMPLOYMENT. JOBS WANTED Houston M1dtowne Spa is. accepting applications, cashier experience pre­ferred Recent photo required. 522-2379, 3100 Fannin ESTA TE SALES FINDINGS, 2037 Norfolk. 522-3662 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD FENCES NORTH STAR FENCE CO .• 694-9113 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD FLOWERS CLASSIC DESIGNS OF HOUSTON, 1811 Indiana, 523-3791 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD (MISC.) FOR SALE KING SIZE BED with canopy Excellent condition $200 negotiable 952-7650. FOR YARD SALES See ads under "Yard Sales" at the end of the Voice Classifieds. FUNERAL DIRECTORS SOUTHWEST FUNERAL DIRECTORS. 1218 Welch. 528-3851 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CREMATION SERVICE INTERNATIONAL. 692-5555. 363-9999 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD FURNITURE GALLERY GENEOLOGY Genealogy research in U.S. & U.K Expe­rienced and accredited. Mr. Craig Albis­ton 622-3216. GIFTS CHRISTMAS CRITTERS. 1318 Nance SEE OUR DISPLAY AO HAULING HAULING, ETC. Pick up and delivery. hauling. bonded Jeff Cunningham, 522-3451. INSTRUCTION CAREER INSTITUTE. 3015 Richmond. 529-2778 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD PARALEGAL CLASSES • TEA Approved • Tuition Financing • Placement Assistance CAREER INSTITUTE 529-2778 3015 Richmond Ave. FREE TRAINING WORD PROCESSING Qua I ifications: •Type 15wpm • Houston city residency • High school diploma/ G.E.D. •low Income Call Computech 880-5575 INSURANCE F. W Turner and ASSociates now handles pre·pald legal insurance. Call Frank Turner at 522-6558 AL'S INSURANCE SERVICE, 4108 Fan­nin. 529-0140 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CYNTHIA H MANSKER INSURANCE. 3311 W Alabama #100. 522-2792 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD Are your tired of struggling with the high cost of Insurance? Call today for a free competitive quote. Cynthia H. Mansker Insurance Agency 522- 2792 Auto • H-om·ecown-en -• R1ente n • LHI INVESTOR WANTED Need $70,000, terms neg , secure with real estate 984-0334 or 754-2414 LAWN CARE BETTER LAWNS-& GARDENS. m:-­LAWN SEE OUR DISPLAY AD STIXX AND CHIPS INC. 665-6294.- 332-4443 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO Stixx and Chips, Inc. 665-6294 or 332-4443 We do yards, repair and build wood fences, light hauling, lawn care, light mov­ing, house cleaning, p ai nti n g, gutt ~ rs , small house repairs. Free Estimates MEDICAL CARE STEVE D MARTINEZ, M.D., 12 Oaks Tower, 4126 SW Fwy #1000, 621-7771 MILITARY CLOTHES KILROYS, 1723 Waugh 528-2818 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD MODELS. ESCORTS. MASSEURS THOM OF HOUSTON 523-6577 Massage muscular. attractive. healthy, hairy. anytime. appointment recom­mended (713) 278-7380 Houston massage by Marz-521 -0425 if you're lookinQtor escorts or masseurs, call Adam 663-6269 Needing a hot black male escort for a hot. physical and daily workout? Just call and ask for Adam 663-6269 Call 24 hrs. a day Looking for a small petite elegant young lady lor a day in the gym or a night out on the town Call and ask for Falon 663- 6269 Massage, young masseuse. full one hour session City lie. Rick 680-9750 REGISTERED MASSEUSE Relaxa11on or remedial, convenient loca­tion. one hour $30 988-2910 A PREMIUM SERVICE Body Rub 24 hrs 526-3711 Deep muscle. sensuous body rub, even­ings and weekends Leave message Steve 640-6690 Body rubs by Bill. alter 6pm weekdays. 24 hours weekends 529-3970 Stimulating -body rubs OUtc alls 529- 3970 PALM/TAOROT READING Psychic and Advisor Channeling, Card and Palm Readings by Anna Marie Will Advise on All Affairs of Life 522-0985 715 Richmond Special Readings $10 PAPER HANGING ALL AMERICAN CONSTRUCTION-.-- 827-1 422 or 497-5228 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD Paper Hanging and Vinyl Resigential and Commercial All Types Remodeling ALL AMERICAN CONSTRUCTION 827-1422 or 497-5228 PERSONALS DON'T DO IT ALONE Join original 24-Hour Sex Link Uninhi­bited, discrete. No bill to phone exr.ept Ing/ dst One-on-one, man-to·man. low­cost connections 1,000's of horny guys waiting for calls. (415) 346-8747 S&M BOTTOM. 928-3318. Attractive, sensitive. professionai:'" GWM, 25, seeks same 25-35 for good conversa­tions, dining out. movies and summertime frolics. Photo, phone to Boxholder, 4212 San Felipe #104, Houston, TX 77027 Good look.ing and. straight acting Asian male seeking a sincere and masculine male for possible relationship. Reply to Box 337-S c/o Voice. 33 year old GWM boy looking for GWM daddy for lasting relationship. 680-8009. 21 yr old G/H/Mseeks a sincere. honest. 20-30 yr old who enjoys all performing and visual arts for a fulfilltng relationship Reply Blind Box 335-M c/o Voice 20 yr old, GWM boy, looking for GWM leather daddy who's into light S&M Reply Blind Box 334-A c/o Voice. THE RIGHT CONNECTION, 976-9696- SEE _2UR DISPLAY AD LIVE ACTION NETWORK·. 976-8500 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD THE MEN'S CONNECTION, 976-2MEN gE OUR OISPLA Y AD PLAY ... safely at J.O E. Meetings 5 nights a week. And it's fun (See our other ads) LISA'S RECORDED LOVE STORIES ** SHE WILL WHISPER * SWEET NOTHINGS IN * * YOUR EAR. * ** CALL 1-900-410-3600 * * DIRECT 1-900-410-3700 * NOW! 1-900-410·3800 * * NO MEMBERSHIP NECESSARY * ** * JS• s~:,~011.10~;.~~n:''"''• * * * * * * * * * * RULES FOR THE PERSONALS· Person­als (and other advertising) should not describe or imply a description of sexual organs or acts No Personals should be directed to minors. Advertising must be "posit ive," not "negative." (If you have certain preferences in other people. list the qualities you desire. Please don't be negative by listing the kinds of people or qualities you don't desire.) Thank you. and happy hunt ing - AN EROTIC ADVENTURE The Society of J_O E., a private organiza­tion for reasonably attractive adult gay men, meets 5 nights weekly. Admission times are 8-9pm Tues & Thurs.: 11 pm- 145am Fri & Sat.6-9pmSun at theCot­tage Playhouse. 611 Pacific. (Rear of ~ouse Look for PlaySale flag.) CONFIDENTIAL PHOTO FINISHING Henry's One-Hour Photo has moved to 408 Avondale. in the same build ing as the Montrose Voice. Open Monday-Friday 9am-6pm. SAFE SEX? For your mental health, have sex. For your physical health, make 11 sale sex Sale sex is where there are no bodily fluids exchanged The virus which leads to an AIDS cond1t1on 1s believed usually trans­mitted from one person to another from blood or semen. Those who are "recep­tive" are especially at risk. Do condoms protect? They cartainly help But con­doms MUST be used with a water-based lubricant (the new product Lubrasept1c is especially recommended) Petroleum or vegetable-based lubricants will actually dissolve the condom and ehm1nate the protection Please ·Play Sale." A CLASSIFIED AFFAIR? John Preston and Frederick Brandt can show you how to have active fun or play passive games with the personal ads. In their book, "Class1l1ed Affairs." they'll tell you how to write an ad that really stands out. what to expect when you place or respond to an ad, and even whal all those funny little abbreviations mean Send $8 to "Classified Affairs," Alyson Pub, Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton, SI., Boston. MA 02118.(Also included will be a coupon for $5 off on your next Personals in your choice of 25 publications. including the Voice.) PEST CONTROL TEXAS TEAM 0 PEST, 526-1111 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD RESULTS HOME CHEMICAL & PEST CONTROL, 223-4000 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD PETS Kittens. 10 weeks old, freeto good home. 522-3658 alter 7pm TOM'S PRETTY FISH, 224 Westhe1mer, 520-6443 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD PET CARE PET PLEASERS. 8787 S Gessner, 776-3383 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD r ~PET- .LEASeiis, I °' ,. 8787 So. Gn1ner I off Hwy. 59 I - 776-3383 I I $5 off Open Mon.-laL I wtth this 15 YHra Grooming coupon Expertence L -----J PHOTO FINISHING 1 HOUR QUALITY PHOTO WE DO IT ALL' Printing and developing, enlargements, jumbo prints, film. Kodak paper, 2615 Waugh Dr 520-1010. HENRY'S 1 HOUR PHOTO, 408 Avon­dale, 529-8490 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO PRINTING SPEEDY PRINTING, 5400 Bellaire Blvd. 667-7417 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD PSYCHOLOGISTS JEFF BLACKWELL. A.N. MA 3131 East· side Suite 340 523-8357 oA'NICi=toLAS EDD:2i28 we1ch: 527- 8680 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD Dr. Nicholas Edd, Psy.D PSYCHOLOGIST Insurance Accepled-24 Hour Phone Service Memorial City Prof Bldg 1 902 Frostwood Sto. 269 Houston 77024 465 -2377 Montrose 2128 Welch, 527-8680 RESTAURANTS HUNGRY INTEANATfONAL, 2356 Rice Blvd . 523-8650 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CHARLIE'S. 1102 Westhe1mer522-3332 SEE_ OUR DISPLAY AO • CAFE EDlW Alabama-at Sheph7rd 520-5221 . SEE OUR DISPLAY AD f31~kE0,J~tf/,t5sthe1mer-:5"28-43so VIET NAM RESTAURANT: 3215Ma1n at ~J~i2u~2~s~!~ AD 'tH!' J>O't t>I.t Open 24 Hours a Day 1525 Westhelmer 528-4350 c.AfEE'D1- ch1cken • Fish • Pasta 2 for 1 Anytime with this Coupon per Party of Two Orders to Go, Call 520-5221 -W-. Ala-bam-a a-t Sh-eph-erd- I APRIL 10, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 27 , :... SELF HELP Gay Men's Network Rob-526-9064 Steve-869-9952, Terry-622-3956 SUPERMARKETS KROGER. 3300 Montrose SEE OUR DISPl..A Y AD TAX PREPARATION INCOME TAX PREPARATION Tax returns. IRS Tax problems, audits Taxes are our business-Our only busi­ness. Tax Consultants of Houston 468- 6199. TIRES THE TIRE PLACE, 1307 Fairview, 529- 1414 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD ··~ 529-1414 l$TftE 11 t\ E PLACE ALL BRANDS 1307 Fairview - 3 bl ks West ('f Montrnse TRAVEL NEW ORLEANS GUEST HOUSE. 1118 Ursulines. (504) 566-1177 SEE OUR DISPl..A Y AD FRANKLIN GUEST HOUSE, 1620 Franklin, Denver. Co .. (303) 331-9106 SEE OUR DISPl..A Y AD FRANKLIN - H-OU-SE- - DENVER 303/331-9106 520-8108 in Houston for info A Guest House at 1620 Franklin Denver, CO 80218 Rete.1;: $14-$18 Single. From $20 Double TYPESETTING SAME DAY TYPESETTERS, 408 Avondale, 529-08490 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO VIDEO LOBO VIDEO. 1424-C Westhe1mer. 522-5156 SEE OUR DISPLA-"-Y_A_D'--c-,--,,- Vl DEO TAPE COPY INC .. 3013 Fountainv1ew. 781-0033 SEE OUR OISPLA Y AD VIDEO TAPE COPV ,_c OONT LOSE OR ERASE THAT PRECIOUS VIDEO • HAVE A COPY MAOE" or COPY !EDIT YOUR HOME VIDEO IN THE PRIVACY OF OUR EDITING ROOMS e BETA TO VHS e Bmm TO TAPE e MONTROSE AREA DELIVERY AVAIL 781-0033 3013 f()UN TAIN VIEW YARD & GARAGE SALES HAVING A YARD SALE? Announce 11 here then stand back for the crowd. Call 529-8490 orv1s1t the Voice at 408 Avondale to place your yard sale announcement ADS BY THE INCH In addition to our regular classified rates of paying "by the word," you can purchase space here "by the inch." Since these are considered "Display Ads," not "Classified Ads," you can include special art. logos or fancy typestyles. REGULAR RATE 1" $34 2" $44 3" $54 1 AD PER WEEK for 4 WEEKS RATE 1" $29 2·· $39 3" $49 1 AD PER WEEK for 13 WEEKS RATE 1" $24 2" $34 3" $44 1 AD PER WEEK for 26 WEEKS RATE 1" $19 2·· $29 3" $39 The Montrose Voice It's The Place to Advertise Call 529-8490 and You will be in Next Week's Newspaper of Montrose 28 MONT ~~~ .. ~~~ .............. 111!1!11!1! .. lll!! .................... . ROSE VOICE I APRIL 10 ' 1987
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