Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Voice, No. 1099, November 16, 2001
File 020
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Voice, No. 1099, November 16, 2001 - File 020. 2001-11-16. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/781/show/771.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2001-11-16). Houston Voice, No. 1099, November 16, 2001 - File 020. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/781/show/771

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1099, November 16, 2001 - File 020, 2001-11-16, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/781/show/771.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 1099, November 16, 2001
Contributor
  • Weaver, Penny
  • Crain, Chris
Publisher Window Media
Date November 16, 2001
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 020
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 16, 2001 OUT ON THE BAYOU 19 homefront Tropicals offer winter beauty As annual Cow Parade cows retire to pasture, a tour of the city offers colorful indoor, outdoor foliage professional cabinetry • closet by ELLA TYLER The Cow Parade cows are now on their way to the last round up, but they were fun while they lasted. In the course of checking out the cows, 1 visited several places that I don't visit often. I saw some very pretty public spaces and got new ideas for big and small gardens. Sam Houston Park, downtown at Lamar and Bagby, has some unusual plants in the gardens around its houses. It is worth a visit for a leisurely stroll or for inspiration if you are trying to landscape an old house. I found a pretty little park on the other side of downtown, at Austin and Lamar, that I hadn't seen before. My quest for cows took me to the Galleria. I rarely go there, but the stores were closed, and except for the contractors remodeling, the place was empty. Its interi- orscaping is scattered pots planted with ferns and orchids. They make a striking display. In this kind of display, each plant usually has its own pot. The pots can be changed out when the flowers fade. Each plant can have the kind of soil it likes but the plants should have similar requirements for heat, light and humidity. In this case, both ferns and orchids like humidity. Seeing these pots reminded me of the first time I saw bromeliads. It is also the first time I remember seeing plants in a commercial interior, except for the philo- dendron at the dentist's office. It was when I was a teenager, and they were at Neiman's, when it was still downtown. There was a planter of them at the top of the escalator. They had a silvery-green leaf and, pink bract with tiny blue flowers. Bromeliads and orchids are worth using more often both inside and outside. Since many of the varieties derive nourishment from the air or have cups that hold water, they need less space for roots and can be planted in relatively small containers. Some can be even be wired to a board. They have Local gay artist Kermit Eisenhut decorated this and several other bovine for the Houston Cow Parade, which is about to reach its end for this year. long lasting flowers or bracts that are eyecatching. I continued onward to Uptown Park, which I hadn't visited before. Its outdoor planters have interesting and imaginative plant combinations. I saw one with loropetalum and caladium, and the spots on the caladium were the same color burgundy as the new growth on the loropetalum. It is also called Chinese witch hazel or fringe flower, and blooms in the winter and early spring. One planter has druanta, which gets one of its common names, sky flower, from its blue flowers, and its other, golden dew- drop, from its small fruits. One pot included Jewels of Omar, which is rarely seen. Its botanical name is talinum paniclarum. It has spikes with lots of tiny bright red and yellow flowers in late summer. Some of these plants are tropical, but they might survive the winter outdoors. They are on concrete walks, which retain heat, and are sheltered. Many tropicals, however, begin to lose leaves when temperatures fall below 40. Chinese evergreens and peace lilies are notorious examples. Speaking of tropicals, many people have bananas now. The fruit stalk can be cut from the tree when the edges of the bananas begin to get rounded. The stalk can be hung in a cool place and hands can be brought inside to ripen. A friend gave me some, and though they don't taste quite like Chiquita, I found them to be edible. They are sweeter and have a slight citrus undercurrent. If you have them, put some chunks out for the birds. Drag out a Cuban cookbook and fry them like plantains or make banana bread. One of the things that occurred to me on this mission was that I could have more fun with my garden. I don't think I'm ready for a painted cow, but my pots and birdbaths and patio furniture are all very tasteful and classic. My roses are colorful, but only in one area of the garden. Rainbow Moosaic, at Sam Houston Park, reminded me of the mirrored Mexican flowerpots that were all over the place a few years ago. I wanted one, but couldn't find one that wasn't too gaudy. I've decided to make my own. And it might not be white. 1 might even plant a hot pink hibiscus by the front door. But, if you're ready for a cow, 60 of them will be auctioned off at Wortham Center on Dec. 6. You can get all the details from www.cowparadehous- ton.com. ■F yOO"R CLOSET HRD LOOKED THIS GOOD... C-»>-y HOME 4 O F F 1 I w f For a free design consultation, call (113) 688-8808 Visit our showroow 3556 V. TC Jester • home office • garage • pantry OVER TWO ACRES OF ORNAMENTAL & ARCHITECTURAL CONCRETE HOME & GARDEN DECOR We also feature dramatic residential & commercial fountains and accessories. Business Highway 290 East in Hempstead Open every day but Wednesdays from 9 to 6 409-826-6760 Frazier's A js(srt\m. Ornament id and Architectural Concrete
File Name uhlib_31485329_n1099_019.jpg