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Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999
File 018
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Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999 - File 018. 1999-12-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 18, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7565/show/7553.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1999-12-03). Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999 - File 018. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7565/show/7553

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999 - File 018, 1999-12-03, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 18, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7565/show/7553.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 3, 1999
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 018
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 3,1999 OUT ON THE BAYOU 17 cvd/betweenad/ Lukos Moodysson, director of 'Show Me Love/ > Continued from page 15 become such a sensation in Sweden and in a number of other Scandinavian countries, when it is struggling to secure bookings at American art house theaters? According to its director and writer, the answer is a simple one—acceptance. "For some reason, American movie-going audiences seem to have a hang-up with movies that deal with gay or lesbian subjects. That's just not the case in Europe," Moodysson said in a telephone interview from Sweden. "I think the success of 'Show Me Love' demonstrates that Swedes and most Europeans aren't as homophobic as their American cousins. That may sound like a generalization, but it's true. 'Show Me Love' is a beautiful romance that I think anyone could relate to. The fact that the lovers are both girls shouldn't make a difference." Starring film newcomers Alexandra Dahlstrom and Rebecca Liljeberg, "Show Me Love"—which is now showing in Houston— is the story of Elin, a smalltown teenage girl who discovers she's a lesbian and begins to have feelings for Agnes. The film documents Elin's efforts to come to terms with her self and her budding lesbianism. When Moodysson first sat down to write the screenplay for "Show Me Love," the Swedish poet made himself a list of guidelines, No. 1 on his list was making sure the story was set in the present. "I think people are more moved by films that have contemporary settings," he said. "I like to write stories about living in the here and now. Otherwise, you can be tempted to create a whole lot of false inventions." Ensuring that the characters in the screenplay rang true was his next concern. "When I look at reality around me, I see stories," he said. "I don't actively do any research on the streets, but I continually see tensions and emotions around me. But 1 do constantly find myself going through neighborhoods, wandering about what might be going on in the houses there. I am obsessed by houses and the lives of the people in them. That's kind of how I came up with 'Show Me Love.' For some reason, I wanted to explore the idea of a teenager who comes to her parents and says, 'Guess what? I'm a lesbian.' For me, a crisis is always a good starting point for a story about feelings and emotions." Moodysson admits he has always been fascinated with the way that women are always more apt to express themselves in more emotional terms than men. "When I was a teenager myself, I can remember noticing how clearly teenage girls expressed their personal desperation and frustration," he said. "But 'Show Me Love' is not meant to be depressing. I feel that my one responsibility as a writer and director is to find happy endings to heavy and serious themes, like discovering your true sexual identity. Out of a crisis or conflict, you can always find reconciliation and hope." As Moodysson sees it, the world, America in particular, could use more "feel good" movies about coming-out and embracing homosexuality. "I'm so tired of seeing movies where a homosexual man or woman has to pay a big price for just being themselves," he said. ".American and British films have a tendency to want to punish characters for being gay. I think that's where a lot of the homophobia comes from - from films. Movies definitely influence our lives. But it vou keep showing that bad things are in store if you admit you are a lesbian or male homosexual, then people will get the idea that it is wrong. "I hope 1 have made a difference with Show Me Love.' In essence, it's a film that celebrates love, even if it's love between two young women. I hope that more American filmmakers see it and take my lead. The more that filmmakers educate their audiences about real life, the better life will be for all ot us," Moodysson said. Oan Antonio is a special place during the holidays. It's transformed into an exotic mix of festive charm and extraordinary hospitality. Virtually something new and different to enjoy every day and night. The Plaza San Antonio clearly captures this spirit. You'll appreciate our attentive, 4 Diamond service. The ambiance of superb dining, including extravagant Holiday Brunches. A resort atmosphere where you'll find a soothing massage followed by a warm, complimentary terrv robe waiting in your lavish guestroom and oh, so much We cordially invite you to experience San .Antonio's holiday season at a very special value. The Plaza. Just steps from the Riverwalk and the only downtown resort for the holidays. ONLY $79 Per Room Per Night (Includes Weekends) Tuc cctti Space available Otfa c«kl2/26W *- dales applv. Nik valid fi» groups. 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