Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999
File 011
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999 - File 011. 1999-12-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 31, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7565/show/7546.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1999-12-03). Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999 - File 011. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7565/show/7546

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999 - File 011, 1999-12-03, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 31, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7565/show/7546.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 3, 1999
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 011
Transcript 10 NEWS DECEMBER 3, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE Police turn to gay community to solve brutal New Orleans slaying >- Continued from Page 1 deepened as they partially opened the front door and found Sexton's body on the other side—in a pool of blood. "David was right up against the door," .Loria said. "It was pretty bad for us ... but I can't imagine what it was like for David. He must have put up quite a struggle." Police and Orleans Parish Coroner Dr. Frank Minyard said that Sexton, an internationally renowned researcher in early childhood intervention and special education, had been viciously stabbed at least 16 times. Following an autopsy, Minyard said Sexton suffered long, deep gashes to his arms, suggesting that he attempted to fend off his attacker. He was also stabbed twice in the heart, had several other chest and back wounds, and two wounds in the back of his head, authorities said. In an attempt to allay the fears of neighbors in Sexton's quiet Bayou St. John neighborhood, Minyard told reporters that he was killed "by someone who knew Sexton and who he let in his house [or] possibly returned with to his home. This was not a random murder." Signs of a struggle extended from Sexton's bedroom to the front door, police said. Minyard said that based on the condition of Sexton's nude body, the three days of newspapers on his dixirstep, and reports from friends—Loria and Scott, who were among the last to see him alive—that Sexton died in the early morning hours of Nov. 20. Det. Tim Allen of the New Orleans Police Department said that Sexton's wallet and house keys were stolen, but that nothing else appeared to be missing, nor were their signs of forced entry. He declined to say whether the murder weapon, believed to be a kitchen knife, was found. He also wouldn't confirm the presence of bloodied footprints on the porch or the discovery of fingerprints and a blood type other than Sexton's. "This investigation is in progress and I don't want to jeopardize the case by discussing what we may or may not have as evidence," Allen said. Police ask for help, say attacker was hurt Allen said that the police investigation has hit a dead-end and police need the help of the gay community to solve Sexton's murder. "It looks like David did know the perpetrator, based on what we found at the house," Allen said. "For how long, we don't know. He may have met him that night or longer before. We just don't know." Allen said that police went to several gay bars that Sexton's friends said the professor occasionally frequented, including the Phoenix and the Friendly Bar in Faubourg Marigny. Visits to those and other Marigny and French Quarter bars fumed up nothing, Allen said. "We haven't found anyone at any [gay] bars who recognized David and remember seeing him early that morning," the detective said. But the perpetrator may be more easily identified than police initially thought, Allen said. "We think he may have been injured in the course of the struggle," .Allen said. "I can't say how, but if anyone, anyone, remembers seeing someone last week with cuts and scratches on his arms, hands, neck, or to his head, or saw fresh bandages, they should call us. "If someone seems to have just dropped out of sight, gone underground, or is acting unusual, people should call us. Or if they remember seeing someone [that Saturday morning] with bloodied clothes, or if they've noticed blood in someone's car, they should call." Sexton fondly remembered Loria said that he, Scott and Sexton enjoyed a Friday evening out that began with dinner, included a play, and ended with jovial conversation at the Friendly Bar, a small neighborhood establishment in the Marigny. "We were there about two hours and never noticed anyone strange," Loria said. "And David had only four drinks the entire night, so I know he wasn't impaired in any way." He said Sexton dropped them each off at their homes about 1 a.m. on Nov. 20, "but he didn't say anything about going anywhere else. I assumed he was going home." .\lthough they often exercised together at a gym on Saturday mornings, "David told me he had a grant or something like that to work on that Saturday morning, so I didn't call him." Loria said his friend, whom he had known for more than a decade, "must have really struggled" for his life. "David was tall—6 feet 3 inch es—and although he was thin, he was really strong and in great shape for a 51-year-old man. He must have fought whoever killed him." Loria said that Sexton was not known to cruise bars, and instead frequented smaller establishments outside the busy French Quarter. "He wasn't the type to just pick someone up, not at all," Loria .said. "David was quite a talker, and very friendly, and would check someone out first." Loria said he first met Sexton and his partner, Jerry Robinson, about a decade ago. Sexton and Robinson were together for more than 20 years. Robinson died two years ago from lung cancer, he said. In .September, Loria and Sexton traveled to Greece for 12 days "and we had an absolutely wonderful time. In fact, we had such a good time we were already planning to go again next September." Struggling to find the words to describe his friend and Sexton's impact on people, Loria said: "Half of the professional people I know owe their work to David. He encouraged people to do more, even me; I have a master's [in social work] anu i ie badgered me to get something published, just one paper, until I did it. Sexton, who earned his doctorate from the University of Tennessee, was a researcher and professor in the School of Allied Health Professions at LSU Health Sciences Center. Sexton was nationally recognized as an expert in early childhood development and was president of the Council for Exceptional Children's Division of Early Childhood. ^7 >]oin us in our excitement as we anticipate the coming of our Lord and Saviour, the Baby Jesus at MARANATHA FELLOWSHIP MCC 3400 Montrose, suite 600 (Corner of Montrose and Hawthorne) Advent Services Sundays: December 5th, 12th, and 19th at 10:30am December 19, 10:30am Special Worship Service in Story and Song to conclude the Advent season # Nursery available for all services. For more information, call 713-528-6756 or email us at maranatha@lconn.com. ^
File Name uhlib_31485329_n997_010.jpg