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Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999
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Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999 - File 010. 1999-12-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 30, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7565/show/7545.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1999-12-03). Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999 - File 010. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7565/show/7545

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999 - File 010, 1999-12-03, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 30, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7565/show/7545.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 3, 1999
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 010
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 3, 1999 VOICES AND ECHOES PLANT LIFE Resolutions for a new year and a new millennium by DREW PLANT At least once every year, I write a list aimed at resolutions for self-betterment. Now I suspect I am supposed to write about changing the world or myself for the new millennium. I'm all for any signal flare that creates ,i chance tor bonafide introspection. We're a self-absorbed lot, me included, and we love to decide what we'll do next for self help. 1 just wish we could be motivated to such on our own, and at some real juncture of change. (I ley, the new millennium starts with 2001, not 2000; could we at least obsess about it in the right year?) Well, instead of being a complete party pooper, I intend to drag my dateless self to a New Year's Eve fund-raising gala with my fine lesbian friend Abby on my arm and party like it's, well, 1999. In the meantime, 1 chose to stake my claim on World AIDS Day—that was Dec. 1—as a time of promised change and self-reflection. You see, I think we've become a little too blase about the disease that the AIDS Czar herself—Atlanta's own Sandy Thurman—recognizes as "no longer chic." If you didn't wear a red ribbon or write a check {and, by God, what more important thing could you write a check for?), I hope you at least stopped on the one paltry day we set aside for the Pandemic of Modern Generations to do the following: (1) Call someone you know who is HIV-positive to say, "I am so glad you are healthy and still with us; please take care of yourself"; and (2) call someone you know who is HIV-negative and say, "I am so glad you have been able to avoid this terrible pandemic; keep yourself healthy." As for the Y2K, you make your wish- and-self-help list, and I'll make mine: Take more tub baths. One week short of the six-month mark in my new low- slung ranch house, I finally took a long, hot bath. It was blissful. Why in the hell did I wait this long? I looked at catalogs, read a bit of Vanity Fair and didn't touch myself once. Really. Read each issue of Vanity Fair with the fervor of a stalking fan. I know it's trash, but it is star-fucking, intriguing trash. It's the People magazine of the academic, semi-informed wannabes. Escape to Palm Beach, moneyed people with fetishes and the rumors of people who have better bodies than anyone you or 1 could even hope to sleep with. Watch CBS' Sunday Morning (with melodic-voiced Charles Osgood!) on a regular basis. On Halloween weekend, 1 was ensconced at my sister's Nashville home alone, all Sunday morning from 7:30 a.m. until the troops got back from an Episcopalian attempt at faith. I worked on mv laptop (computer!), perused the Nciv York Times and watched the best hour and a half of television since an episode of Dynasty ran long in the 1980s. I plan to proselytize for HGTV. No, I'm not going to sell my bodv for sex. I want everyone to know how addictive Home and Garden Television is. Okay, I know they have the insanelv craftv shows, but they also can honestlv teach you to redo your foyer in marble and still host a dinner party the same night. Is this TV-by-and-for-fags, or what? I plan to work in the yard more. I don't care if it has been digging up a half-buried and rusted-out toaster oven (no kidding), planting abelia or doing basic lawn maintenance, the time 1 have spent in my new old house's yard has been gratifying beyond description. Did I pay for all of that therapy before I had a yard? When I am in the yard, I don't even care if the neighborhood children come around. This is bliss. I've said it before, but I am really, really, really going to say "no" more. Okay, maybe not to the tragic men in my life, but to commitments I shouldn't be mak ing. It is indescribably freeing to let go of the need to do everything. I suspect it will take a century of World AIDS Days to do so, but 1 will learn not to take on everything, and I am starting now. No. I plan to actually get to know Helpful Larry from the Storehouse Clearance Center. I plan to not apologize for shopping at Storehouse. I plan to unapologetically adopt the neighborhood stray cat, feed it well and take it for regular veterinary care. Starting now, her name is "Lunchmeat." As for you, I hope you will write and tell me what vou are doing for tlie new millennium. While you're at it, tell me what you did to help make this one of the last World AIDS Days we need to have. Ever. I gave the Love of My Life and several of my best friends to this disease, and I am all given out. In whatever ways work for you, commit to celebrating a real holiday that's a cause none of us can ignore. Dreiv Plant is an Atlanta writer who works in corporate communications for an insurance and viatical company. He wants you to actually do something about AIDS. He can be readied at dreioplant@sovo.com. Let us know what you think Send the editor your letters (400 words maximum) or op-ed submissions (800 words maximum). Names may be withheld upon request, but submissions must indude a name and phone number for verification. Houston Voice, 500 Lovett, Suite 200, Houston, TX 77006 fax; 713-529-9531 • e-mail: editor@houstonvoice.com LETTERS Some films do trans well To the Editor: When Mark J. Huisman wrote about negative movie characterizations of transgendered people ("On the outside," Nov. 19), which is unfortunately too often the case, he quotes Rosalyne Blumenstein, the executive director of the Gender Identity Project as saying, "There's never been a movie who has just allowed a person of trans experience to just be that person without pathology or ridicule." I am more disappointed and surprised that apparently neither of them is aware of two films I can recall which did. "Just Like A Woman" and "Different for Girls," both of which played in Houston, were set m England, tn the first, a male, heterosexual transvestite is thrown out of the house by his wife who returns from vacation early to find his stash of female clothing scattered about their flat and assumes he is having an affair. The film portrays the trials and tribulations he endures, including being arrested and humiliated by the police, the knowledgeable acceptance by his business colleague, and his ultimate victory over his transphobic boss. In "Different for Girls," a post-operative transsexual meets and falls in love with a high school class mate who is now a motorcycle messenger delivery person. Again it deals with her personal relationship and career issues in a sympathetic manner. Both films had male actors who portrayed the transgendered roles effectively. Both were low visibility films that should have, but never got, the distribution the subject matter deserved. More of this sort of portrayal will go a long way toward demystifying tr-ansgen- dered people. jack Adams Houston Bush can learn from Buchanan To the Editor: The decision of George W. Bush to refuse to speak to the Log Cabin Republicans ("Bush says no to meeting with gay Republicans," Nov. 26) suggests that he is a homophobic bigot pandering to a religious group fueled by ignorance, hatred and superstition. Pat Buchanan, whose writings dealing with homosexuality may have been fueled by a viscera] homophobia, apparently has had his epiphany. This event occurred, of course, on the road which he hopes will reach to the White House, (story, page 6) The major contender for the Reform Party presidential nomination has urged gays to enter tlie Reform Party and to support his candidacy. Does this represent intellectual growth in a person who has been called a "bigot" and a "Nazi" by many in the media? Or is this sheer political opportunism in the manner oi George W. Bush? Whatever it is, Buchanan cannot help but experience a measure of soul-searching and look upon some of his gay bashing of recent years with regret. As for George W. Bush, he has exposed himself as the bigot that he is. One can oppose the concept of gay marriage without being a bigoted homophobe. But for Bush to refuse to speak to loyal members of his own political party because of their sexual orientation suggests that "Shrub" is still hopelessly immature and a coward to boot for his failure to recognize the humanity of persons simply because their sexual orientation is different. Rev.TomHuttJRet.) Menasfia, Wise. Bradley a gay come-lately To the Editor: I read your account of the controversy surrounding Bill Bradley's suggestion to amend the 1964 Civil Rights Act ("Gore, Bradley spar over gay rights," Nov. 26), but I'm concerned it widely missed the mark. I agree Bill Bradley is a good and fair- minded man. I also believe his commitment today to the gay community is real. Unfortunately, his timing, his record and his judgment are not as real. In 1991, Bill Bradley had the chance to co- sponsor legislation to do precisely what he now advocates, but he did not. Most voters probably don't realize that during his 18-year career in the U.S. Senate, Bill Bradley authored 573 bills. Not one of them would have gu.ar.an- teed, expanded or even addressed the rights of gay men and lesbians. He failed to co-sponsor, conveniently missed or voted against bills of importance to us. We welcome Bill Bradley's newfound passion. Just imagine his legislative clout and his vote in the Senate on behalf of gay concerns these past three years had he instead decided to stay and fight in the Senate with other Democratic leaders. Paul Yandura Washington, D.C. Editor's note: Tlie letter writer worked three years as a presidential appointee in tlie Clinton/Gore administration and tat th National Gay and Lesbian Outreach Director for the Clinton/Gore '96 campaign.
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