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Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999
File 009
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Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999 - File 009. 1999-12-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7565/show/7544.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1999-12-03). Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999 - File 009. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7565/show/7544

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999 - File 009, 1999-12-03, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7565/show/7544.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 3, 1999
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript VOICES AND ECHOES DECEMBER 3, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE VIEWPOINT A profile in courage chooses to fight Editor Matthew A. Hennie editor@houstonvoice.com Production Bethany Bartran - Graphic Designer Mike Swenson - Graphic Designer Contributors Rich Arenschieldt, Kay Y. Dayus, Trayce Diskin, Earl Dittman, D.L. Groover, Robert B Henderson, Gip Plaster. Ella Tyler Photographers Dalton DeHart, Kim Thompson, Terry Sullivan Advertising Sales Richard B. Hayes Office Administrator Marshall Rainwater Classifieds & Directory Carolyn A. Roberts Carolyn White National Advertising Representative Rivendell Marketing Company, Inc 212-242-6863 Publishers Chris Crain Rick Ellsasser A WindowMedia Publication Ik MEMBER mm CHARTER MEMBER GREATER HOUSTON GAY & LESBIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Established 1974 as the Montrose Star. 5*00 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200 Houston, Texas 77006 (713) S29-8490 (800) 729-8490 Fan:(713) 529-9531 Contents copyright 1999 Office hours: 9 a.m. to 530 p.m. weekdays To submit a letter Letters should be fewer than 400 words. We reserve the right to edit for content and length. We will withhold names upon request, but you must include your name and phone number for verification. Please send mail to Houston Voice, 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200, Houston, Texas 77006; fax (713) 529-9531 or e-mail to editor©houston- voke.com. Opinions expressed therein do not reflect those of the Houston Voice byGREGKUBlAK Perhaps you've wondered how a gay friend could choose to serve in the military, the Republican Party or a religious domination that officially withdraws thc welcome mat for gays. At times I think what a waste it is for these lesbians and gay men to work in institutions where hope for our integration is futile. But most of the time, I stay thankful we have our own on the inside, fighting for change and doing what they believe. Steven Baines is executive coordinator of Equal Partners in Faith, a Washington-based network of religious leaders committed to equality and diversity* He was born and raised in Charleston, S.C, where he attended the oldest Southern Baptist church in the country. One day, when he was six, his preacher walked him up into the large, raised pulpit of that historic sanctuary. Unable to see over the lectern, the young boy tugged at the preacher's robe, telling the minister, "I want to see!" As he lifted the young Baines up to see the magnificence of the empty church, the boy knew he wanted be a preacher. But as he grew older, Baines learned another thing about his life. He was gay. Despite the nagging reality of his sexual orientation, Steven eventually became Rev. Baines, an ordained minister in one of the nation's most homophobic denominations. He desperately wanted to make "his life right." So he attended an ex-gay ministry in Raleigh, N.C, under an assumed name soon after taking his first preaching job. After a year in the pro gram, Baines found only one lesson was being taught: that he should hate himself for his homosexual tendencies. But one day, Baines looked in the mirror and heard an inner voice telling him he was as God intended and changing that God-given nature was futile. The self-acceptance came hard for ing "homosexuals are incompatible with community standards," Rev. Baines could no longer stay silent. He spoke at a protest rally and came out. Fearing that word of this provocation, and of being gay, would make its way to his fundamentalist parents, Baines told them later that week, on Thanksgiving The next time you think what a waste it is for gays to work within anti-gay institutions like the Southern Baptist denomination, remember Rev. Steven Baines. Baines, but not as difficult as what was to come in his congregation some time later in Greenville, S.C. He had developed a mutual, romantic relationship with a church organist, who was struggling with the same self-hatred from which Baines was now free. Incapable of enduring the difficult relationship, Baines ended it. But in a retaliatory act, the jilted lover outed the young minister to church leaders. Very quickly, a few of them confronted Baines with the charge. Rather than lie and perhaps save his job, Baines told the truth, "Yes, I am gay" On the spot, Baines was told he had "four months to find another job", and was asked to go quietly so that the "scandal" would not impair the church's ability to hire a replacement. But when Greenville passed an ordinance declar- mHANGERS Yes. WireHan-|era! O Great for "Closet" fij*W Organlzere... ^^^^m\ 18.99/UBOSS ^——-\> APLASTIC FORKS ^2* You'll epear every last ?9^r those elegant Gay rSmmW^ Brunches! .99/DOZ. CORDLESS Chat wtth all rnQNC your gay friend* about the latest gay news.. ^TOASTER ^HOUSEHOLD ***" Krlikr-M An\\r.ir,nm> ^P*-NM CI ICCC Makes delicious Gay Toast! Multiple s-ettlna for a Rainbow of Golden Broivne.. Features "Extra Wide" Slots I $12.99 , Have a "Circuit farty" and Illuminate vour home with Pride I $3.99 STEAM IRON Wrinkles are so Ffcsse! I Makes nice crisp 1 creases in all those I fancy designer clothes 1—1 wear....Hot. Hot. till $14.95 ^PAPERCLIPS _ Great for ormanizin-a ali-^>-3fc your gay correspondence^^} A classic design...You Go <5lri1l $.99/4;KOSS ^TRAVEL UMBRELLA You'll love the feel of It In your Hanaa1 I $<(.<(9 day. His mother did not speak and left the room. His father, after expressing shame and disgust, demanded his son to give back his house key "No words could ever express the devastation that 1 felt when my father told me he wanted the keys to the family house back," Baines said. "The unspoken message he gave then was, 'You're no longer my son.'" Since that time, his chilled, family relationship has thawed somewhat. But not so with his church. Baines, like many of our profiles of courage, has turned his personal tragedy into an activist calling. He now works in an important national ministry at Equal Partners in Faith. He organizes and speaks at rallies and conferences that challenge the sexist, racial and homophobic forces in the church and society—the same forces that saw him fired from his job and nearly disowned by his family. Baines leads "Equality Summits" that highlight progressive values in response to the Promise Keepers, the arch-conservative group that conducts large, anti- gay crusades in football stadiums. Despite his new work and the reach of his ministry, Baines has not renounced his denominational roots or his ministerial credentials. Instead, he intends to be "a thorn in the side" of a church he sees as out of touch with the true meaning of Christian love. By his own admission, Baines may never live to fulfill his dream of being an openly gay minister in the Southern Baptist church. But maybe one day, he'll again climb into that pulpit of the country's oldest Baptist church and preach the word. In the meantime, he's still tugging at church robes. Greg D. Kubiak is a Washington-based public policy analyst, author and syndicated writer; he can be reached via this publication or by e-mail, GKubiak@aol.com.
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